Events occurring on Thursday, October 17, 1940  
  The Battle of the Atlantic  
  A straggler from Convoy SC-7, the Greek steam merchant Aenos was sunk by gunfire by the U-38, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Liebe, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 25 survivors were picked up by the Canadian steam merchant Eaglescliffe Hall. The 3,554 ton Aenos was carrying wheat and was bound for Manchester, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-7, the British motor tanker Languedoc was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bleichrodt, approximately 160 miles northwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 39 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMS Bluebell (K 80). The 9,512 ton Languedoc was carrying fuel oil and was bound for Clyde, United Kingdom.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-7, the British steam merchant Scoresby was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48 approximately 160 miles northwest of Rockall. Of the ship’s complement, all 39 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMS Bluebell (K 80). The 3,843 ton Scoresby was carrying pit props and was bound for Clyde, United Kingdom.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-228, the Norwegian steam merchant Dokka was torpedoed and sunk by the U-93, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Claus Korth, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 10 died and 7 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Folkestone (L 22). The 1,168 ton Dokka was carrying ballast and was bound for Mont-Louis, Gaspe, Quebec.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-228, the British steam merchant Uskbridge was torpedoed and sunk by the U-93 in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 27 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Montreal City and the Dutch steam merchant Katwijk. The 2,715 ton Uskbridge was carrying anthracite and was bound for Montreal, Quebec.  
   
  Inside the Japanese Empire  
  Buddhist priest Inoue Nissho was released from Kosuge Prison in Tokyo. Inoue was the leader of the Ketsumeidan (League of Blood), an ultranationalist group. Each member of the group pledged to kill at least one wealthy businessman and liberal politician on or about February 11, 1932, the 2,592 celebration of the ascension to the throne of the first Emperor of Japan. Twenty victims were targeted but only former Finance Minister and head of the Rikken Minseito, Junnosuke Inoue (on February 9) and Director-General of Mitsui Holding Company, Dan Takuma (on March 5) would become actual victims. Inoue and the assassins were sentenced to life imprisonment in November 1934 with the rest of the arrested group members given lighter sentences.  
     
   
  October 1940 Calendar  
   
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