Events occurring on Sunday, September 15, 1940  
  The Long Range Desert Group  
  'W' Patrol of the No.1 Long Range Patrol Unit commanded by Captain Edward 'Teddy' Cecil Mitford of the No.1 Long Range Patrol Unit set out to carry out a reconnaissance of Kufra and Uweinat in eastern Libya. Finding no trace of the Italians, they turned south and attacked fuel dumps, aircraft and an Italian convoy carrying supplies to Kufra. The group captured two Italian trucks and official mail.  
   
  'T' Patrol, commanded by Captain Patrick Clayton, reconnoitered the main route between Kufra and Uweinat. The group then drove south to meet French forces in Chad. The unexpected visit by Clayton’s groups was instrumental in encouraging the French forces in deciding to join the Free French instead of remaining loyal to the Vichy regime. ‘W’ and ‘T’ patrols would rendezvous at the southern tip of the Gulf of Kebir along the Egyptian-Libyan border at a pre-positioned supply dump and then returned to Cairo.  
   
  The Battle of the Atlantic  
  While escorting Convoy SC-3, the sloop HMS Dundee (L 84) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bleichrodt, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 12 died and the survivors were picked up by the Norwegian steam merchants Vigsnes , Granfoss and Fido and the destroyer HMS Wanderer (D 74).  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-3, the Greek steam merchant Alexandros was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48 in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 25 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Wanderer (D 74). The 4,343 ton Alexandros was carrying timber and paper and was headed for Sharpness, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-3, the British steam merchant Empire Volunteer was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bleichrodt, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 33 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian merchant Fido and the Norwegian merchant Granli. The 5,319 ton Empire Volunteer was carrying iron ore and was headed for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-70, the Norwegian motor merchant Hird was torpedoed and sunk by the U-65, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Gerrit von Stockhausen, about 180 miles from Barra Head, Scotland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 30 survived and were picked up by the Icelandic trawler Þórólfur. The 4,950 ton Hir was carrying general cargo, including resin, lumber and black carbon and was headed for Manchester, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SC-3, the Canadian steam merchant Kenordoc was stopped by gunfire by the U-99, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto Kretschmer, about 44 miles west-northwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The Kenordoc was later scuttled by the destroyer HMS Amazon (D 39). Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 13 survivors were picked up by the HMS Amazon and the destroyer HMCS St. Laurent (H 83). The 1,780 ton Kenordoc was carrying timber and was headed for Bristol, England.  
   
  Canada in WW2  
  Following legislation that was passed in August of 1940, conscription into the armed services began for single men in Canada between 21 and 24.  
     
   
  September 1940 Calendar  
   
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