Events occurring on Wednesday, September 18, 1940  
  The Battle of the Atlantic  
  Sailing with Convoy OB-213, the British steam passenger ship City of Benares was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bleichrodt, approximately 250 miles west-southwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 260 died and 147 survivors were picked up by the destroyers HMS Hurricane (H 06) and HMS Anthony (H 40). The 11,081 ton City of Benares was carrying passengers and was headed for Montreal, Canada. The City of Benares was carrying 90 evacuated children, which had been on their way to Canada to escape the German air attacks on Britain. 77 of them lost their lives. After this incident, no more children were sent overseas.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-213, the British steam merchant Marina was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48 approximately 250 miles west-southwest of Rockall. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 37 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Hurricane (H 06) and the British merchant Carlingford. The 5,088 ton Marina was carrying general cargo, including coal and was headed for River Plate, Argentina.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SC-3, the British steam merchant Magdalena was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48 south of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 31 died. The 3,118 ton Magdalena was carrying iron ore and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  The second group of U.S. ships involved in the in the destroyers-for-bases transfer to Great Britain arrived at Halifax, Nova Scotia. This group included the USS Kalk (DD 170), USS Maddox (DD 168), USS Cowell (DD 167), USS Foote (DD 169), USS Hopewell (DD 181), USS Abbot (DD 184), USS Thomas (DD 182) and the USS Doran (DD-185).  
   
  The light cruiser USS St. Louis (CL 49) shifted from St. John's, Newfoundland, to Argentia with the Greenslade Board aboard. The Greenslade Board was a committee formed "to make a comprehensive study of the shore establishment (naval and commercial) necessary to support the Fleet in peace and war." With the strategic requirements of the fleet in mind, the board was instructed to make recommendations for additional facilities in new locations and as to the expansion, limitation, contraction, abandonment, or conversion of existing shore facilities. The board was known by its senior member, Rear Admiral John W. Greenslade./the board, headed by Rear Admiral John F. Greenslade, which would evaluate base sites acquired from the British on September 5 in the destroyers-for-bases agreement.  
   
  Ships Commissioned  
  A ship's commissioning was when the ship was handed over, post fittings and trials, to the end user which, in this case, was a combatant navy.  
  The destroyer HMS Cleveland (L 46) was commissioned. Her first commander was Lt. Commander William S. Clouston.  
   
  The destroyer USS Mayo (DD 422) was commissioned. Her first commander was Lt. Campbell D. Emory.  
   
  The submarine U-143 was commissioned. Her first commander was Oberleutnant zur See Ernst Mengersen.  
     
   
  September 1940 Calendar  
   
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