Events occurring on Thursday, April 3, 1941  
  The East African Campaign  
  British troops defeated Italian forces and captured Asmara, the capital of Eritrea.  
   
  Iraq in WW2  
  The pro-Axis Rashid Ali Al-Gaylani returned to power as Prime Minister and his "National Defense Government" replaced the government of the Regent, which had been overthrown by a military coup on April 1, 1941.  
   
  The Battle of the Atlantic  
  After providing ocean escort duty for the dispersed convoy SC-26, the British armed merchant cruiser HMS Worcestershire (F 29) was torpedoed and damaged by the U-74, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Eitel-Friedrich Kentrat, southwest of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-26, the Greek steam merchant Leonidas Z. Cambanis was torpedoed and sunk by the U-74 southwest of Reykjavik, Iceland. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 27 survived. The 4,274 ton Leonidas Z. Cambanis was carrying wheat and was bound for Swansea, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SC-26, the British steam merchant Alderpool was torpedoed and sunk by the U-73, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Rosenbaum, southwest of Reykjavik, Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 39 survived and were picked up by the British merchant Thirlby. The 4,313 ton Alderpool was carrying wheat and was bound for Hull, England.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy SC-26, the British steam tanker British Viscount was torpedoed and sunk by the U-73 southwest of Reykjavik. Of the ship’s complement, 28 died and 20 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Havelock (H 88). The 6,895 ton British Viscount was carrying Admiralty fuel oil and was bound for Scapa Flow, Scotland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-26, the Belgian steam merchant Indier was torpedoed and sunk by the U-73 southwest of Reykjavik. Of the ship’s complement, 42 died and 4 survived. The 5,409 ton Indier was carrying steel and general cargo and was bound for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-26, the British steam merchant Westpool was torpedoed and sunk by the U-73 southwest of Reykjavik. Of the ship’s complement, 35 died and 8 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Havelock (H 88). The 5,724 ton Westpool was carrying scrap iron and was bound for Leith, Scotland.  
   
  The Finnish steam merchant Daphne was torpedoed and sunk by the U-76, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Friedrich von Hippel, south of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 22 died. The 1,939 ton Daphne was carrying coal and was bound for Lillehammer, Norway.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy SC-26, the British steam merchant Thirlby was torpedoed and damaged by the U-69, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jost Metzler, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The 4,887 ton Thirlby was carrying wheat and was bound for Hull, England.  
   
  Events Leading to Pearl Harbor  
  In a letter to the commanders in chief of the Pacific, Asiatic, and Atlantic Fleets, U.S. Navy's Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Harold R. Stark, expressed the feeling that beyond question the presence of the Pacific Fleet in Hawaii had a stabilizing effect in the Far East.  
   
  The Pacific Before Pearl Harbor  
  The heavy cruisers USS Chicago (CA 29), under command of Rear Admiral John H. Newton, Commander Cruisers Scouting Force, and USS Portland (CA 33) and the destroyers USS Clark (DD 361), USS Conyngham (DD 371), USS Reid (DD 369), USS Cassin (DD 372), and USS Downes (DD 375), departed Suva, Fiji Islands, bound for Pearl Harbor.  
   
  Ships Commissioned  
  A ship's commissioning was when the ship was handed over, post fittings and trials, to the end user which, in this case, was a combatant navy.  
  The submarine U-564 was commissioned. Her first commander was Oberleutnant zur See Reinhard Suhren.  
   
  The submarine U-652 was commissioned. Her first commander was Oberleutnant zur See Georg-Werner Fraatz.  
     
   
  April 1941 Calendar  
   
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