Events occurring on Monday, April 28, 1941  
 
  The German Invasion of Greece  
  Italian troops started occupying the Ionian and Aegean islands.  
   
  The Battle of the Atlantic  
  The U-65, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Joachim Hoppe, was sunk in the North Atlantic southeast of Iceland by depth charges from the destroyer HMS Douglas (D 90). All of the ship’s complement of 50 died. During its career under another commander (Kapitänleutnant Hans-Gerrit von Stockhausen) the U-65 sank 12 ships for a total of 66,174 tons and damaged 3 ships for a total of 22,490 tons.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-121, the Norwegian motor tanker Caledonia was torpedoed and sunk by the U-96, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Lehmann-Willenbrock, south of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 12 died and 25 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Zaafaran. The 9,892 ton Caledonia was carrying diesel and fuel oil and was bound for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-121, the British motor tanker Oilfield was torpedoed and sunk by the U-96 south of Iceland. Of the ship’s complement, 47 died and 8 survivors were picked up by the ASW trawler HMS St. Zeno (FY 280). The 8,516 ton Oilfield was carrying benzine and was bound for London, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-121, the British steam merchant Port Hardy was torpedoed and sunk by the U-96 south of Iceland. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 97 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Zaafaran. The 8,897 ton Port Hardy was carrying mutton, cheese, zinc, and general cargo and was bound for Avonmouth, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-121, the British motor tanker Capulet was torpedoed and damaged by the U-552, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erich Topp, south of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 11 died and 35 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Douglas (D 90) and the British rescue ship Zaafaran. The 8,190 ton Capulet was carrying fuel oil and was bound for Scapa Flow, Orkneys.  
   
  Operation Mercur – The German Invasion of Crete  
  The Prime Minister of Greece, Emmanouil Tsouderos, chaired a meeting at Canea on Crete between the leaders of the Greek forces and British officers. The meeting concluded with the issue of a reinforcement request to strengthen the defense of the island.
  Learn more about Operation Merkur ...
 
   
  Events Leading to Pearl Harbor  
  British Rear Admiral Victor H. Danckwerts responded in a letter to Rear Admiral Richmond K. Turner, the U.S. Navy’s Director of the War Plans Division, that "that the consequential reduction in the strength of the United States Pacific Fleet would not unduly encourage Japan." U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt had directed Admiral Kelly to consult the British Chiefs of Staff on the proposal to transfer vessels from the Pacific to strengthen the Atlantic Fleet.  
     
   
  April 1941 Calendar  
   
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