Events occurring on Thursday, June 12, 1941  
  Allied Diplomacy  
  From St. James's Place in London fourteen Allies vowed to fight until victory is won. The governments and governments in exile of Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Belgium, Czechoslovakia, Greece, Luxemburg, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Yugoslavia, and Free France also pledged mutual assistance and to not conclude any separate peace treaties with the Axis alliance. The governments stated: “That they will continue the struggle against German or Italian aggression until victory has been won and they will mutually assist each other in this struggle to the utmost of their respective capacities.” and "There can be no settled peace and prosperity so long as free peoples are coerced by violence into submission to domination by Germany or her associates or live under the threat of such coercion.”.  
   
  The Battle of the Atlantic  
  Fourteen Beaufighters of Nos. 22 and 42 Squadrons departed from bases in Scotland and torpedoed the German battleship Lutzow which had been sighted off the Norwegian coast by a No. 114 Squadron Blenheim. The Lutzow returned to port at Kiel for repairs and would not return to service until January 1942.  
   
  The British motor merchant Silverpalm was torpedoed and sunk by the U-371, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Driver, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 68 died. The 6,373 ton Silverpalm was carrying general cargo and was headed for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Empire Dew was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Schultze, north of the Azores in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 23 died and 19 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian destroyer St. Albans (I 15). The 7,005 ton Empire Dew was carrying ballast and was headed for Father Point, New Brunswick.  
   
  The unescorted British motor merchant Chinese Prince was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Erich Topp, south of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 45 died and 19 survivors were picked up by the corvettes HMS Arbutus (K 86) and HMS Pimpernel (K 71). The 8,593 ton Chinese Prince was carrying general cargo, including potash, currants, and magnesite and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OG-64, the Norwegian steam tanker Ranella was torpedoed and sunk by the U-553, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Karl Thurmann, in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 29 survived and reached the Azores by lifeboat. The 5,590 ton Ranella was carrying ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OG-64, the British steam merchant Susan Mærsk was torpedoed and sunk by the U-553 in the central Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 24 died. The 2,355 ton Susan Mærsk was carrying ballast and was headed for Curaçao.  
   
  Naval Action in the Mediterranean  
  The submarine HMS Taku (N 38), commanded by Lt. Commander Edward C.F. Nicolay, intercepted a convoy and torpedoed and sank the 1,367 ton Italian merchant Silvio Scaroni in the Gulf of Syrte.  
   
  The Dutch submarine O-24 (P 24), commanded by Lt. Commander Otto de Booy, sank the Italian tanker Fianona (6600 GRT) off Vada, Toscana, Italy with torpedoes and gunfire. The HNMS O-24 also sank the Italian auxiliary patrol vessel V 121 / Carloforte  with gunfire and scuttling charges 36 nautical miles northwest of Gorgona, Italy.  
   
  The United States Navy  
  All members of the U.S. Naval Reserve, not in a deferred status, were called to active duty.  
   
  Ships Commissioned  
  A ship's commissioning was when the ship was handed over, post fittings and trials, to the end user which, in this case, was a combatant navy.  
  The submarine U-574 was commissioned. Her first commander was Oberleutnant zur See Dietrich Gengelbach.  
     
   
  June 1941 Calendar  
   
  Previous Day Following Day  
   
     
   
 

The objective of WW2Timelines.com is to provide a day by day account of the events that lead up to and were part of the greatest conflict known to mankind. There are accounts for the activities of each particular day and timelines for subjects and personalities. It is the of this website intent to provide an unbiased account of the war. Analysis, effects caused by an event, or prior or subsequent pertinent events are presented separately and indicated as text that is italicized.

 
   
  Copyright 2011
WW2timelines.com
Contact us using our email page