Events occurring on Wednesday, September 10, 1941  
  Occupied Norway  
  German authorities in Oslo, Norway, declared martial law and trade union officials were arrested in order to prevent a trade union plan for a general strike.  
   
  The Battle of the Atlantic  
  The U-501, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hugo Förster, was sunk in the Straits of Denmark south of Angmagsalik, Greenland by depth charges and ramming from the Canadian corvettes HMCS Chambly (K 116) and HMCS Moosejaw( K 164). Of the ship’s complement, 11 died and 37 survived. During its career the U-501 sank 1 ship or a total of 2,000 tons.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-42, the British steam merchant Muneric was torpedoed and sunk by the U-432, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Heinz-Otto Schultze, south of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 63 died. The 5,229 ton Muneric was carrying iron ore and was headed for Middlesbrough, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-42, the Norwegian steam merchant Stargard was torpedoed and sunk by the U-432 south of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 15 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian steam merchant Regin and a corvette. The 1,113 ton Stargard was carrying lumber and was headed for London, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-42, the Dutch steam merchant Winterswijk was torpedoed and sunk by the U-432 south of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, 20 died and 13 survivors were picked up by a corvette. The 3,205 ton Winterswijk was carrying phosphates and was headed for Methil, Scotland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-42, the British motor merchant Sally Mærsk was torpedoed and sunk by the U-81, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Friedrich Guggenberger, east-northeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 34 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMCS Kenogami (K 125). The 3,252 ton Sally Mærsk was carrying wheat and was headed for Sharpness, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-42, the British catapult armed merchant Empire Hudson was torpedoed and sunk by the U-82, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Siegfried Rollmann, northeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 63 survivors were picked up by the British merchant Baron Ramsay and the Norwegian merchant Regin. The 7,465 ton Empire Hudson was carrying wheat and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-42, the British steam merchant Thistleglen was torpedoed and sunk by the U-85, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Eberhard Greger, northeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 46 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Lorient. The 4,748 ton Thistleglen was carrying pig iron and steel and was headed for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  The unescorted Dutch motor merchant Marken was torpedoed and sunk by the U-111, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wilhelm Kleinschmidt, north of Ceara, Brazil in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 37 survived and were picked up by a Spanish steam merchant. The 5,719 ton Marken was carrying aircraft and was headed for Calcutta, India.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-42, the British steam tanker Tahchee was torpedoed and damaged by the U-652, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Georg-Werner Fraatz, northeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The 6,508 ton Tahchee was carrying fuel and diesel oil and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  German Commerce Raiders  
  The German commerce raider Atlantis, disguised as the Dutch motor-ship Brastagi, captured the 4,793 ton Norwegian freighter Silvaplana between New Zealand and the Society Islands in the Southwest Pacific Ocean. The Silvaplana was bound for New York from Singapore with a cargo of crude rubber, coffee, Balinese carved wooden idols, and a valuable mixed cargo of hides, tin, copper, wax, sago, vanilla and spices, plus a full deck cargo load of teak. Rogge decided to keep the Silvaplana as a prize dispatched her to Bordeaux, France where she arrived safely on November 17, 1941.  
   
  Ships Commissioned  
  A ship's commissioning was when the ship was handed over, post fittings and trials, to the end user which, in this case, was a combatant navy.  
  The Soviet submarine ShCh-407 was commissioned.  
   
  The Soviet submarine ShCh-408 was commissioned.  
     
   
  September 1941 Calendar  
   
  Previous Day Following Day  
   
     
   
 

The objective of WW2Timelines.com is to provide a day by day account of the events that lead up to and were part of the greatest conflict known to mankind. There are accounts for the activities of each particular day and timelines for subjects and personalities. It is the of this website intent to provide an unbiased account of the war. Analysis, effects caused by an event, or prior or subsequent pertinent events are presented separately and indicated as text that is italicized.

 
   
  Copyright 2011
WW2timelines.com
Contact us using our email page