Events occurring on Saturday, September 20, 1941  
  The Battle of the Atlantic  
  The unescorted British motor merchant Cingalese Prince was torpedoed and sunk by the U-111, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wilhelm Kleinschmidt, east-southeast of St. Paul Rocks in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 57 died and 20 survivors were picked up by the British sloops HMS Weston (L 72) and HMS Londonderry (L 76). The 8,474 ton Cingalese Prince was carrying general cargo, including manganese ore and pig iron and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OG-74, the British steam merchant Baltallinn was torpedoed and sunk by the U-124, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Johann Mohr, north-northeast of the Azores in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 28 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Walmer Castle. The 1,303 ton Baltallinn was carrying government stores and was headed for Gibraltar.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OG-74, the British steam merchant Empire Moat was torpedoed and sunk by the U-124 north-northeast of the Azores. Of the ship’s complement, all 32 survived and were picked up by the British rescue ship Walmer Castle, the corvette HMS Marigold (K 87) and the sloop HMS Deptford (L 53). The 2,922 ton Empire Moat was carrying ballast and was headed for Gibraltar.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-44, the Norwegian motor tanker Barbro was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erich Topp, east of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 34 died. The 6,325 ton Barbro was carrying petrol and was headed for Stanlow, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-44, the Panamanian steam merchant Pink Star was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552 east of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, 13 died and 22 survived. The 4,150 ton Pink Star was carrying general cargo and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-44, the British steam tanker T.J. Williams was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552 east of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, 17 died and 22 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Honeysuckle (K 27). The 8,212 ton T.J. Williams was carrying motor fuel and was headed for Stanlow, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-44, the British catapult armed merchant Empire Burton was torpedoed and sunk by the U-74, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Eitel-Friedrich Kentrat, east of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 58 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Honeysuckle (K 27). The 6,966 ton Empire Burton was carrying wheat and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  A U.S. Army shore battery fired across the bow of the destroyer USS Charles F. Hughes (DD 428) as U.S. Navy Task Unit 4.1.2, under command of Commander Fred D. Kirtland, entered Hvalfjordur, Iceland in foggy weather conditions.  
   
  Naval Action in the Mediterranean  
  Charges attached by midget submarines of the Italian navy exploded and sank the British naval tanker Denbydale, cargo ship Durham, and tanker Fiona Shell in the Grand Harbor of Gibraltar.  
   
  Ships Commissioned  
  A ship's commissioning was when the ship was handed over, post fittings and trials, to the end user which, in this case, was a combatant navy.  
  The destroyer HMS Offa (G 29) was commissioned. Her first commander was Lt. Commander Robert A. Ewing.  
     
   
  September 1941 Calendar  
   
  Previous Day Following Day  
   
     
   
 

The objective of WW2Timelines.com is to provide a day by day account of the events that lead up to and were part of the greatest conflict known to mankind. There are accounts for the activities of each particular day and timelines for subjects and personalities. It is the of this website intent to provide an unbiased account of the war. Analysis, effects caused by an event, or prior or subsequent pertinent events are presented separately and indicated as text that is italicized.

 
   
  Copyright 2011
WW2timelines.com
Contact us using our email page