Events occurring on Wednesday, September 24, 1941  
  The Battle of the Atlantic  
  Sailing with Convoy SL-87, the British motor merchant Dixcove was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Günter Hessler, southwest of Madeira in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 51 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian steam merchant Fana. The 3,790 ton Dixcove was carrying West African produce and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-87, the British steam merchant John Holt was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107 southwest of Madeira. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 68 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Gorleston (Y 92). The 4,975 ton John Holt was carrying West African produce and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-87, the British steam merchant Lafian was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107 southwest of Madeira. Of the ship’s complement, all 47 survived and were picked up by the sloop HMS Gorleston (Y 92). The 4,876 ton Lafian was carrying palm kernels, timber, palm oil, and bullion and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-87, the British steam merchant St. Clair II was torpedoed and sunk by the U-67, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Müller-Stöckheim, west-northwest of the Canary Islands in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 13 died and 31 survivors were picked up by the sloops HMS Gorleston (Y 92) and HMS Lulworth (Y 60). The 3,753 ton St. Clair II was carrying palm kernels, palm oil, and sundries and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  United Nations Events  
  At a meeting of the Inter-Allied Council in St. James' Palace in London the governments of Belgium, Czechoslovakia, Greece, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, the Soviet Union, Yugoslavia, and representatives of General Charles de Gaulle, leader of the Free French, unanimously adopted adherence to the common principles of policy set forth in the Atlantic Charter.  
   
  The Attack on Pearl Harbor  
  The Japanese Consul in Hawaii, Nagai Kita, was instructed to report on the precise number and type of warships moored at Pearl Harbor. The message was intercepted by American intelligence services but lack of descriptors and transport problems would delay translation until October 9, 1941 when officials decided to ignore the message and consider it the same as routing espionage activities already going on in Manila, Panama, and Seattle.  
   
  Ships Commissioned  
  A ship's commissioning was when the ship was handed over, post fittings and trials, to the end user which, in this case, was a combatant navy.  
  The submarine HMS P-36 (P-36) was commissioned. Her first commander was Lt. Harry N. Edmonds.  
     
   
  September 1941 Calendar  
   
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