Events occurring on Friday, April 10, 1942  
  The Japanese 1941-42 Philippines Campaign  
  A force of three warships and eleven transports landed 12,000 Army troops of the "Kawaguchi Detachment" at seven beachheads across southern Cebu on the Philippines.  
   
  The USS Snapper (SS-185), commanded by Lt. Commander Hamilton L. Stone, evacuated 27 military personnel when she departed the besieged island of Corregidor.  
   
  The minesweeper USS Finch (AM-9), commanded by Lt. Thurlow W. Davison, was damaged by Japanese aircraft off Luzon. The ship would be abandoned by her crew the next day and allowed to sink in position. The USS Finch was salvaged by the Japanese and served in the Imperial Japanese Navy as IJN W103 and its fate is unknown.  
   
  The crews of the river gunboats USS Oahu (PR 6), USS Luzon (PR 7), and USS Mindanao (PR 8) were transferred ashore to man U.S. Army guns at Fort Hughes, Manila Bay.  
   
  The Battle of the Atlantic  
  The unescorted British motor tanker San Delfino was torpedoed and sunk by the U-203, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Rolf Mützelburg, east of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Of the ship’s complement, 28 died and 22 survivors were picked up by the ASW trawler HMS Norwich City (FY 229). The 8,072 ton San Delfino was carrying aviation fuel and was headed for Hull, England.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker Tamaulipas was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erich Topp, about 18 miles northeast of Cape Lookout, North Carolina. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 35 survivors were picked up by the ASW trawler HMS Norwich City (FY 229). The 6,943 ton Tamaulipas was carrying furnace oil and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Empire Prairie was torpedoed and sunk by the U-654, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Ludwig Forster, east of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. All of the ship’s complement of 49 died. The 7,010 ton Empire Prairie was carrying general cargo and was headed for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian motor merchant Chr. Knudsen was torpedoed and sunk by the U-85, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Eberhard Greger, in the western Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 33 died. The 4,904 ton Chr. Knudsen was carrying general cargo and nitrate and was headed for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  Allied Submarine Action in the Pacific  
  The submarine USS Thresher (SS 200), commanded by Lt. Commander William L. Anderson, torpedoed and sank the 3,039 ton Japanese transport ship Sado Maru about 5 miles north of Oshima, near the entrance to Tokyo Bay, Honshu, Japan.  
   
  The Doolittle Air Raid on Japan  
  A Japanese Navy radio intelligence unit located outside of Tokyo intercepted radio transmissions between U.S. Navy Task Force 16 centered on the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CV 6), under command of Vice Admiral William F.”Bull” Halsey, and U.S. Navy Task Force 18 centered on the aircraft carrier USS Hornet (CV 8), under command of Captain Marc Mitscher that was carrying Lt. Colonel James H. “Jimmy” Doolittle and the 17th Bomb Group (Medium). The Japanese deduced the location of TF 18 and concluded that a force containing two, and possibly three aircraft carriers was headed for Japan. The Japanese made plans for long-range army bombers to attack the American force as soon as it been detected by a ring of picket boats stationed in an arc six hundred miles east of Japan.  
   
  From the U.S. Navy Halsey- Doolittle Raid After Action Report: “On 10 April Cimarron fueled both cruisers.”  
     Learn more about the Doolittle Raid …  
   
  The United States Navy  
  The U.S. Pacific Fleet was reorganized into type commands: Battleships (Rear Admiral Walter S. Anderson); Aircraft Carriers (Vice Admiral William F. Halsey Jr.); Cruisers (Rear Admiral Frank J. Fletcher); Destroyers (Rear Admiral Robert A. Theobald); Service Force (Vice Admiral William L. Calhoun); Amphibious Force (Vice Admiral Wilson Brown, Jr.); Submarine Force (Rear Admiral Thomas Withers); and Patrol Wings (Rear Admiral John S. McCain). The old titles of Battle Force and Scouting Force were abolished.  
   
  Ships Commissioned  
  A ship's commissioning was when the ship was handed over, post fittings and trials, to the end user which, in this case, was a combatant navy.  
  The submarine USS Halibut (SS 232) was commissioned. Her first commander was Lt. Commander Philip H. Ross.  
  The submarine HMS Traveler (N 48) was commissioned. Her first commander was Lt. Commander George D. A. Gregory.  
   
  The Soviet submarine M-121 was commissioned.  
   
  The ASW trawler HMS Yestor (T 222) was commissioned. Her first commander was Lt. Robert C. Holt.  
     
   
  April 1942 Calendar  
   
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