Events occurring on Monday, August 10, 1942  
  Case Blau - The 1942 German Summer Offensive Against the Soviet Union  
  German forces captured Pyatigorsk in the Caucasus Mountains.  
   
  The Battle of the Atlantic  
  The Dutch motor merchant Strabo was sunk by gunfire by the U-155, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Adolf Cornelius Piening, about 250 miles east of Georgetown off the coast of South America in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 13 survived and reached land by lifeboat. The 383 ton Strabo was carrying babasu coconuts and was headed for Barranquilla, Colombia.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-94, the Greek steam merchant Condylis was torpedoed and sunk by the U-438, commanded by Rudolf Franzius, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 9 died and 26 survived. The 4,439 ton Condylis was carrying grain and trucks and was headed for London, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SC-94, the British steam merchant Oregon was torpedoed and sunk by the U-438 in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 40 survivors were picked up by the corvettes HMS Dianthus (K 95) and HMS Nasturtium (K 107). The 6,008 ton Oregon was carrying general cargo including foodstuffs and steel and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-94, the British steam merchant Cape Race was torpedoed and sunk by the U-660, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Götz Baur, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 63 survived and were picked up by the corvettes HMS Nasturtium (K 107) and HMS Dianthus (K 95). The 3,807 ton Cape Race was carrying timber and steel and was headed for Manchester, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-94, the British steam merchant Empire Reindeer was torpedoed and sunk by the U-660 in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 65 survived and were picked up by the corvettes HMS Nasturtium (K 107) and HMS Dianthus (K 95). The 6,259 ton Empire Reindeer was carrying general cargo and government stores and was headed for Hull, England.  
   
  The British schooner Vivian P. Smith was sunk by gunfire by the U-600, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Bernhard Zurmühlen, in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 11 survived. The 130 ton Vivian P. Smith was carrying salt and was headed for Barbados.  
   
  The British motor tanker Alexia was torpedoed and damaged by the U-510, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Karl Neitzel, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 64 survived. The 8,016 ton Alexia was carrying ballast and was bound for Curaçao.  
   
  The coastal minesweeper USS Bold (AMc 67) was damaged by the detonation of a mine laid the day before by the U-98 off Jacksonville, Florida in the western Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  Naval Action in the Mediterranean  
  The 158 ton Palestinian sailing ship Kharouf was sunk by gunfire by the U-77, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Schonder, in the eastern Mediterranean Sea.  
   
  Allied Submarine Action in the Pacific  
  The submarine USS S-44, commanded by Lt. John R. Moore, torpedoed and sank the heavy cruiser IJN Kako near Kavieng while it was returning after the battle of Savo Island off Guadalcanal.  
   
  The Nisei - Japanese Americans in WW2  
  The first contingent of internees from the Puyallup Army temporary detention center in Washington arrived at the Minidoka Center near Twin Falls, Idaho/ The Morrison-Knudsen Company had not finished construction of the camp and the internees found that there was no running water and the sewage system had not been installed.  
   
  Ships Commissioned  
  A ship's commissioning was when the ship was handed over, post fittings and trials, to the end user which, in this case, was a combatant navy.  
  The Greek escort destroyer RHS Kanaris (L 53) was commissioned.  
   
  The submarine HMS P-555 (P-555) was commissioned. Her first commander was Lt. Reginald P. Webb.  
     
   
  August 1942 Calendar  
   
  Previous Day Following Day  
   
     
   
 

The objective of WW2Timelines.com is to provide a day by day account of the events that lead up to and were part of the greatest conflict known to mankind. There are accounts for the activities of each particular day and timelines for subjects and personalities. It is the of this website intent to provide an unbiased account of the war. Analysis, effects caused by an event, or prior or subsequent pertinent events are presented separately and indicated as text that is italicized.

 
   
  Copyright 2011
WW2timelines.com
Contact us using our email page