Events occurring on Wednesday, November 4, 1942  
  The Battle for Guadalcanal  
  U.S. Navy Task Group 65.4 cruisers and destroyers bombarded Japanese positions near Koli Point, Guadalcanal.  
   
  The Battle of the Atlantic  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Oued Grou was torpedoed and sunk by the U-126, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Bauer, southwest of Forcados in the Bight of Benin off the coast of central Africa in the southeastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 34 survivors eached land by lifeboat. The 792 ton Oued Grou was carrying ballast and was bound for Port Harcourt, Nigeria.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-107, the British steam merchant Empire Lynx was torpedoed and sunk by the U-132, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Vogelsang, approximately 500 miles southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 43 survived and were picked up by the Dutch merchant Titus. The 6,379 ton Empire Lynx was carrying general cargo and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-107, the Dutch steam merchant Hobbema was torpedoed and sunk by the U-132 approximately 500 miles southeast of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, 28 died and 16 survivors were picked up by the American tugs Uncas and Pessacus. The 5,507 ton Hobbema was carrying general cargo and ammunition and was bound for Belfast Lough, Ireland.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant William Clark was torpedoed and sunk by the U-354, commanded by Kapitänleutnant arl-Heinz Herbschleb, off Jan Mayen Island in the Arctic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 31 died and 40 survivors were picked up by the ASW trawlers HMS St. Elstan (FY 240) and HMS Cape Palliser (FY 256). The 7,176 ton William Clark was carrying lend-lease cargo, including tires, ammunition, tanks and aircraft as deck cargo and was bound for Murmansk, Soviet Union.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SC-107, the British steam merchant Hatimura was torpedoed and sunk by the U-442, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans-Joachim Hesse, approximately 500 miles southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 86 survivors were picked up by the American tugs Pessacus and Uncas. The 6,690 ton Hatimura was carrying general cargo, including TNT, gunpowder, and incendiary bombs and was bound for Manchester, England.  
   
  The U-132, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Vogelsang, was sunk when it was probably within the lethal radius of the ammunition ship Hatimura which had been hit by the U-442. All of the ship’s complement of 47 died. During its career under Kapitänleutnant Vogelsang the U-132 sank 1 warship, sank or damaged irreparably 9 merchant ships for a total of 37,331 tons, and damaged 1 merchant ship for a total of 6,690 tons.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-107, the British steam merchant Daleby was torpedoed and sunk by the U-89, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Dietrich Lohmann, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 47 survived and were picked up by the Icelandic steam merchant Brúarfoss. The 4,640 ton Daleby was carrying grain, tanks, and motor parts and was bound for London, England.  
   
  The U.S. freighter John H. B. Latrobe, proceeding independently from Reykjavik, Iceland, to Archangel, Soviet Union, was attacked by HE 115 torpedo seaplane bombers in the Arctic Ocean. Armed Guard gunfire disrupts the attack by the enemy floatplanes and none of the seven torpedoes launched hit the ship. Strafing, however, slightly damaged the merchantman, and 3 of the 25-man Armed Guard were wounded. The John H.B. Latrobe returned to Reykjavik for repairs.  
   
  The Alaskan Campaign  
  The submarine IJN RO-65 was sunk when she accidentally dove into a reef while seeking to avoid an attack on Kiska harbor in the Aleutians.  
   
  Naval Action in the Indian Ocean  
  The unescorted Norwegian steam merchant Hai Hing was torpedoed and sunk by the U-178, commanded by Kapitän zur See Hans Ibbeken, seven miles from Inhaca lighthouse near Lourenço Marques in the western Indian Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 25 died and 42 survivors were picked up by the Portuguese tug Chaimite. The 2,561 ton Hai Hing was carrying general cargo and was bound for Durban, South Africa.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Trekieve was torpedoed and sunk by the U-178, commanded by Kapitän zur See Hans Ibbeken, east of Maputo in the Mozambique Channel in the western Indian Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 47 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 5,244 ton Trekieve was carrying manganese ore, nuts, copra, and general cargo and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Japanese Submarine Warfare  
  A small reconnaissance seaplane from the submarine IJN I-31 reconnoitered Suva, Fiji Islands.  
   
  A small reconnaissance seaplane from the submarine IJN I-9 reconnoitered Nouméa, New Caledonia.  
   
  Operation Torch – The Allied Invasion of North Africa  
  The submarines USS Shad (SS-235), USS Gunnel (SS-253), USS Herring (SS-233), USS Barb (SS-220), and USS Blackfish (SS-221) were deployed to reconnoiter French North African waters off Rabat, Fedala, Casablanca, Safi, and Dakar, in advance of Operation Torch.  
   
  Ships Commissioned  
  A ship's commissioning was when the ship was handed over, post fittings and trials, to the end user which, in this case, was a combatant navy.  
  The escort destroyer HMS Rockwood (L 39) was commissioned. Her first commander was Lt. Samuel Lombard-Hobson.  
   
  The Canadian minesweeper HMCS Mulgrave (J 313) was commissioned. Her first commander was Lt. Dermot T. English.  
   
  The Australian HMAS Gympie (J 238) was commissioned. Her first commander was Lt. Commander Charles W. J. Patterson.  
   
  The ASW trawler HMS Mullet (T 311) was commissioned.  
   
  The submarine U-416 was commissioned. Her first commander was Oberleutnant zur See Christian Reich.  
     
   
  November 1942 Calendar  
   
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