Events occurring on Friday, October 30, 1942  
  Military Conflict in North Africa  
  The Second Battle of El Alamein continued. The Australian 9th Division broke the German lines at El Alamein and moved to blocking positions along the coastal highway, cutting off several Axis formations.  
   
  The Battle for Guadalcanal  
  U.S. Navy Task Group 64.2, under command of Rear Admiral Norman Scott, comprised of the light cruiser USS Atlanta (CL 51) and four destroyers, bombarded Japanese positions at Point Cruz, Guadalcanal.  
   
  The Alaskan Campaign  
  The Japanese landed a second invasion force at Attu, Aleutians.  
   
  The Battle of the Atlantic  
  The unescorted American steam merchant West Kebar was torpedoed and sunk by the U-129, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Ludwig Witt, approximately 350 miles northeast of Barbados in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 54 survivors were picked up by a British patrol boat, the Spanish motor tanker Campero or reached land by lifeboat. The 5,620 ton West Kebar was carrying manganese ore, palm oil, mahogany, rubber, and general cargo and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SL-125, the British steam merchant Corinaldo was torpedoed and sunk by the U-203, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hermann Kottmann, north of the Canary Islands in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 50 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Cowslip (K 196). The 7,131 ton Corinaldo was carrying frozen meat and was bound for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-125, the British motor merchant Silverwillow was torpedoed, damaged by the U-409, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hanns-Ferdinand Massmann, north-northeast of Madeira in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. The ship for six days before it finally sank. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 61 survivors were picked up by the auxiliary patrol vessel HMS Kelantan (F 166). The 6,373 ton Silverwillow was carrying general cargo and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-125, the British motor merchant Brittany was torpedoed and sunk by the U-509, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Werner Witte, near Madeira in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and 43 survivors were picked up by the auxiliary patrol vessel HMS Kelantan (F 166). The 4,772 ton Brittany was carrying hides, rice, and cotton and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-125, the British steam merchant Baron Vernon was torpedoed and sunk by the U-604, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Horst Höltring, north of Madeira in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 49 survived and were picked up by the British steam merchant Baron Elgin. The 3,642 ton Baron Vernon was carrying iron ore and was bound for Port Talbot, Wales.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-125, the British troop transport Président Doumer was torpedoed and sunk by the U-604 northeast of Madeira. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 260 died and 85 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian steam merchant Alaska and the corvette HMS Cowslip (K 196). The 11,898 ton Président Doumer was carrying troops, general cargo, including palm kernels and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SL-125, the British motor tanker Bullmouth was torpedoed and sunk by the U-659, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans Stock, approximately 100 miles north-northwest of Maderia in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 50 died and 6 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 7,519 ton Bullmouth was carrying ballast and was bound for Tyne, England.  
   
  The A/S trawler HMS Northern Spray (FY 129) was damaged by an explosion, apparently from a torpedo. No attack report has been found in the U-boat logs to match the claim.  
   
  Naval Action in the Mediterranean  
  Four Royal Navy destroyers in the Mediterranean Sea near Port Said, tracked, attacked, and then forced the U-559 to the surface. After the German crew abandoned the submarine three men from the HMS Petard jumped overboard and entered the sinking sub. The three sailors rescued countless secret documents, among them the Short Weather Cipher and Short Signal Book which would allow the codebreakers at Bletchley Park to crack the German signals system. Two of the sailors, Anthony Fasson and Colin Grazier died when the submarine sunk suddenly, but their efforts would save thousands of lives. The third sailor, Tommy Brown, was found to have lied about his age and was discharged from service. He was killed two years later attempting to rescue his two sisters from a burning slum tenement.  
   
  Allied Submarine Warfare in the Pacific  
  The submarine USS Whale (SS 239), commanded by Lt. Commander John B. Azer, was badly damaged by depth charges and was forced to return to base.  
   
  Japanese Submarine Warfare  
  A small reconnaissance seaplane from the submarine IJN I-9 reconnoitered Noumea, New Caledonia.  
   
  Ships Commissioned  
  A ship's commissioning was when the ship was handed over, post fittings and trials, to the end user which, in this case, was a combatant navy.  
  The destroyer HMS Racehorse (H 11) was commissioned. Her first commander was Commander Anthony F. Burnell-Nugent.  
   
  The destroyer HMS Obedient (G 48) was commissioned. Her first commander was Lt. Commander David C. Kinloch.  
   
  The destroyer USS Cony (DD 508) was commissioned. Her first commander was Lt. Commander Harry D. Johnston.  
   
  The escort destroyer HMS Wensleydale (L 86) was commissioned. Her first commander was Lt. John A. McClure.  
   
  The submarine USS Hake (SS-256) was commissioned. Her first commander was Lt. Commander John C. Broach.  
     
   
  October 1942 Calendar  
   
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