June 1940 Events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
  Overview  
  6 Allied war vessels were sunk by U-boats.  
  3 Allied war vessels were sunk by the German battle cruisers SMS Scharnhorst and SMS Gneisenau.  
   
  1 U-boat was sunk by a mine.  
   
  57 Allied and neutral merchant ships were sunk by U-boats totaling 266,689 tons.  
  1 Allied merchant ship was sunk by the Luftwaffe totaling 5,802 tons.  
  3 Allied merchant vessels were sunk by the German battle cruisers SMS Scharnhorst and SMS Gneisenau.  
  2 Allied ships were damaged by U-boats totaling 14,670 tons.  
   
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Saturday, June 1, 1940  
  The boom defense vessel HMS Astronomer was torpedoed and sunk by the U-58, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Kuppisch, 30 miles southeast of Wick, Scotland in the North Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 101 survivors were picked up by the ASW trawlers HMS Stoke City (FY 232) and HMS Leicester City. The 8,401 ton HMS Astronomer was carrying naval stores and was headed for Scapa Flow, Scotland.  
   
  Thursday, June 6, 1940  
  The 20,277 ton armed merchant cruiser HMS Carinthia was torpedoed and sunk by the U-46, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Engelbert Endrass, west of Galway Bay off the western coast of Ireland in the eastern Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  Saturday, June 8, 1940  
  After sinking three empty ships the German battle cruisers SMS Scharnhorst and SMS Gneisenau found and sank the aircraft carrier HMS Glorious (77) and her escorting destroyers HMS Acasta (H 09) and HMS Ardent (H 41). The HMS Glorious was unable to launch her aircraft before sinking.  
   
  Thursday, June 13, 1940  
  The 17,046 ton armed merchant cruiser HMS Scotstoun was torpedoed and sunk by the U-25, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz Beduhn, about 80 miles west of Barra Island, Outer Hebrides northwest of Scotland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 345 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Highlander (H 44).  
   
  Sunday, June 16, 1940  
  The 13,950 ton armed merchant cruiser HMS Andania was torpedoed and sunk by the UA, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans Cohausz, about 230 miles west-northwest of the Faroe Islands, north of Scotland in the North Sea. Of the ship’s complement, all 347 survived and were picked up by the Icelandic trawler Skallagrímur.  
   
  Friday, June 21, 1940  
  The 4,443 ton special service vessel HMS Prunella (X 02) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-28, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günter Kuhnke, in the Southwest Approaches in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 56 died and 40survivors were picked up by the French steam merchant Casamance and the destroyer HMS Versatile (D 32).  
   
  Saturday, June 29, 1940  
  The 4,724 ton special service vessel HMS Edgehill (X 39) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-51, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Dietrich Knorr, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 15 died and 24 survived.  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  Saturday, June 22, 1940  
  The U-122, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans-Günther Looff, went missing since June 22, 1940 in the North Atlantic between the North Channel and the Bay of Biscay. It was presumed to have sunk struck a mine and sank. All of the ship’s complement of 49 died. During its career under Korvettenkapitän Looff the U-122 sank 1 merchant ship for a total of 5,911 tons.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Saturday, June 1, 1940  
  A straggler from Convoy HG-32F, the Greek steam merchant Ioanna was torpedoed and sunk by the U-37, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Victor Oehrn, about 120 miles west of Cape Finisterre off the west coast Spain in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. The 950 ton Ioanna was carrying onions and was headed for Newcastle, England.  
   
  Sunday, June 2, 1940  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Polycarp was torpedoed and sunk by the U-101, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Fritz Frauenheim, about 40 miles south of Lands End, England in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 43 survived and were picked up by the French merchant Espiguette. The 3,577 ton Polycarp was carrying cork, Brazil nuts, rubber, and hides and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Monday, June 3, 1940  
  The Finnish steam merchant Snabb was sunk by gunfire by the U-37, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Victor Oehrn, about 300 miles west of Cape Finisterre off the west coast Spain in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 20 survivors were picked up by the Greek steam merchant Kyriakoula. The 2,317 ton Snabb was carrying ballast and was headed for Daka, Senegal.  
   
  Wednesday, June 5, 1940  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Stancor was sunk by gunfire by the U-48, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans Rudolf Rösing, 80 miles northwest of Butt of Lewis, Scotland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 19 survived. The 798 ton Stancor was carrying fish and was headed for Fleetwood, England.  
   
  Friday, June 7, 1940  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Frances Massey was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans Rudolf Rösing, approximately 15 miles northwest of Tory Island, northwest coast of Ireland in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 34 died and 1 survivor was picked up by the destroyer HMS Volunteer (D 71). The 4,212 ton Frances Massey was carrying iron ore and was headed for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Eros was torpedoed and damaged by the U-48 approximately 15 miles northwest of Tory Island Of the ship’s complement, all 62 survived and were picked up by the ASW trawler HMS Paynter (FY 242). The 5,888 ton Eros was carrying copper, ferro chrome, and small arms and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sunday, June 9, 1940  
The neutral Finnish steam merchant Margareta was torpedoed and sunk by the U-46, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Engelbert Endrass, about 350 miles from Cape Finisterre off the west coast Spain in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 19 survived. The 2,155 ton Margareta was carrying peanuts and was headed for Greenock, Scotland.
   
  Tuesday, June 11, 1940  
  The Greek steam merchant Mount Hymettus was torpedoed and then sunk by gunfire by the U-101, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Fritz Frauenheim, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 24 survived. The 5,820 ton Mount Hymettus was carrying ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted Greek steam merchant Violando N. Goulandris was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans Rudolf Rösing, west-northwest of Cape Finisterre off the west coast Spain in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 22 survived. The 3,598 ton Violando N. Goulandris was carrying wheat and was headed for Waterford, Ireland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OG-33F, the British motor tanker Athelprince was torpedoed and damaged by the U-46, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Engelbert Endrass, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 59 survived. The 8,782 ton Athelprince was carrying ballast and was bound for Cienfuegos, Cuba.  
   
  Wednesday, June 12, 1940  
  The British steam merchant Earlspark was torpedoed and sunk by the U-101, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Fritz Frauenheim, Cape Finisterre off the west coast Spain in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 31 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Enchantress (L 56). The 5,250 ton Earlspark was carrying coal and was headed for Bordeaux, France.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-34, the British steam merchant Barbara Marie was torpedoed and sunk by the U-46, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Engelbert Endrass, off Cape Finisterre, west coast Spain in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 32 died and 5 survivors were picked up by the British motor merchant Swedru. The 4,223 ton Barbara Marie was carrying iron ore and was headed for Workington, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-34, the British motor merchant Willowbank was torpedoed and sunk by the U-46 off Cape Finisterre. Of the ship’s complement, all 51 survived and were picked up by the British motor merchant Swedru. The 5,041 ton Willowbank was carrying maize and was headed for Workington, England.  
   
  Friday, June 14, 1940  
  The unescorted Greek steam merchant Antonis Georgandis was sunk by gunfire by the U-101, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Fritz Frauenheim, northwest of Cape Finisterre off the west coast Spain in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. The 3,557 ton Antonis Georgandis was carrying maize and wheat and was headed for Limerick, Ireland.  
   
  The Greek Steam merchant Mount Myrto was shelled by and then torpedoed and sunk by the U-38, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Liebe, south of Ireland in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 24 survived. The 5,403 ton Mount Myrto was carrying general cargo and timber and was headed for London, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-47, the British steam merchant Balmoralwood was torpedoed and sunk by the U-47, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Prien, about 70 miles south-southwest of Cape Clear. Of the ship’s complement, all 41 survived and were picked up by the British steam merchant Germanic. The 5,834 ton Balmoralwood was carrying wheat and four aircraft as deck cargo and was headed for Falmouth, England.  
   
  Saturday, June 15, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy HX-47, the Canadian steam merchant Erik Boye was torpedoed and sunk by the U-38, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Liebe, 60 miles west of the Scilly Isles in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 22 survived and were picked up by the sloop HMS Fowey (L 15). The 2,238 ton Erik Boye was carrying wheat and was headed for Sharpness, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-47, the Norwegian motor tanker Italia was torpedoed and sunk by the U-38 60 miles west of the Scilly Isles. Of the ship’s complement, 19 died and 16 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Fowey (L 15). The 9,973 ton Italia was carrying aviation fuel and was headed for Manchester, England.  
   
  Sunday, June 16, 1940  
  The unescorted British motor merchant Wellington Star was torpedoed and sunk by the U-101, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Fritz Frauenheim, about 300 miles west of Cape Finisterre off the west coast Spain in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 69 survived and were picked up by the French steam merchant Pierre L.D. or reached land by lifeboat. The 13,212 ton Wellington Star was carrying refrigerated and general cargo and was headed for Falmouth, England.  
   
  Monday, June 17, 1940  
  The Greek steam merchant Elpis was shelled and then torpedoed and sunk by the U-46, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Engelbert Endrass, west of Cape Finisterre off the west coast Spain in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 28 survived. The 3,651 ton Elpis was carrying wheat and was headed for Avonmouth, England.  
   
  Tuesday, June 18, 1940  
  The Finnish steam merchant Sarmatia was torpedoed and sunk by the U-28, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günter Kuhnke, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 23 survived and were picked up by the Spanish trawlers Felix and Pastor Montenegro. The 2,417 ton Sarmatia was carrying ballast and was headed for Sheet Harbour, Nova Scotia.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed Norwegian steam merchant Altair was shelled and then torpedoed and sunk by the U-32, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans Jenisch, south of Ireland in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 18 survived and were picked up by the Spanish trawler Iparreko-Izarra. The 1,522 ton Altair was carrying lumber and was headed for Kings Lynn, England.  
   
  The 108 ton Spanish fishing trawler Nuevo Ons was sunk by gunfire by the U-32, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans Jenisch, south of Ireland in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 7 survivors and were picked up by the Spanish trawler Iparreko-Izarra.  
   
  The 108 ton Spanish fishing trawler Sálvora was sunk by gunfire by the U-32 south of Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, All 12 survived and were picked up by the Spanish trawler Iparreko-Izarra.  
   
  Wednesday, June 19, 1940  
  The unescorted Greek steam merchant Adamandios Georgandis was torpedoed and sunk by the U-28, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günter Kuhnke, southwest of Ireland in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. The 3,443 ton Adamandios Georgandis was headed for Cork, Ireland.  
   
  The unescorted Yugoslavian steam merchant Labud was torpedoed and then sunk by gunfire by the U-32, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans Jenisch, southwest of Fastnet, Ireland in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 34 survived. The 5,334 ton Labud was carrying maize and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HG-34F, the British steam merchant Baron Loudoun was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans Rudolf Rösing, west-northwest of Cape Ortegal, northwest Spain in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 30 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Scarborough (L 25). The 3,164 ton Baron Loudoun was carrying iron ore and was headed for Barrow, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HG-34F, the British steam merchant British Monarch was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48 approximately 200 miles north-northwest of Corunna, northwest Spain. All of the ship’s complement of 40 died. The 5,661 ton British Monarch was carrying iron ore and was headed for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HG-34F, the Norwegian motor merchant Tudor was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans Rudolf Rösing, northwest of Cape Finisterre off the west coast Spain. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 38 survivors were picked up by the corvettes HMS Arabis (K 73) and the HMS Calendula (K 28). The 6,607 ton Tudor was carrying steel and general cargo and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant The Monarch was torpedoed and sunk by the U-52, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto Salman, 60 miles west of Belle Ile in the Bay of Biscay in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 12 died. The 824 ton The Monarch was carrying ballast and was headed for Falmouth, England.  
   
  The unescorted Belgian steam passenger ship Ville de Namur was torpedoed and sunk by the U-52 west of La Rochelle in the Bay of Biscay. Of the ship’s complement, 25 died and 54 survived. The 7,463 ton Ville de Namur was carrying horses and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with a small convoy, the 7,638 ton French steam tanker Brumaire was torpedoed and damaged by the U-25, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz Beduhn, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. The damaged Brumaire was sunk the next day by German aircraft.  
   
  Thursday, June 20, 1940  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Empire Conveyor was torpedoed and sunk by the U-122, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans-Günther Looff, about 50 miles south of Barra Head, Hebrides in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 38 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Campbell (D 60). The 5,911 ton Empire Conveyor was carrying wheat and was headed for Manchester, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HG-34F, the British steam merchant Otterpool was torpedoed and sunk by the U-30, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Fritz-Julius Lemp, about 130 miles west of Ushant off the coast of northwest France in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 23 died and 16 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Scarborough (L 25). The 4,876 ton Otterpool was carrying iron ore and was headed for Middlesbrough, England.  
   
  The unescorted Swedish steam merchant Tilia Gorthon was torpedoed and sunk by the U-38, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Liebe, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 10 died and 11 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Leith (U 36). The 1,776 ton Tilia Gorthon was carrying coal and was headed for Nantes, France.  
   
  The Dutch motor tanker Moordrecht was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans Rudolf Rösing, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 25 died and 4 survivors were picked up by the Greek steam merchant Orion. The 7,493 ton Moordrecht was carrying fuel oil and was headed for Pasajes, Spain.  
   
  The 7,638 ton French steam tanker Brumaire, torpedoed and damaged by the U-25, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz Beduhn, the previous day in the eastern Atlantic Ocean was sunk the next day by German aircraft.  
   
  Friday, June 21, 1940  
  The unescorted Belgian steam merchant Luxembourg was torpedoed and sunk by the U-38, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Liebe, west of St. Nazaire in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 41 survived. The 5,809 ton Luxembourg was carrying general cargo, including boiled beef, maize, and sunflower seed and was headed for Falmouth, England.  
   
  The British steam tanker Yarraville was torpedoed and sunk by the U-43, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wilhelm Ambrosius, southwest of Figueira da Foz, Portugal in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 45 survivors were picked up by the French trawler Marie Gilberte. The 8,627 ton Yarraville was carrying ballast and was headed for Beaumont, Texas.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-49, the British steam tanker San Fernando was torpedoed and sunk by the U-47, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Prien, about 50 miles south-southwest of Cape Clear, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 49 survived and were picked up by the sloops HMS Fowey (L 15) and HMS Sandwich (L 12). The 13,056 ton San Fernando was carrying crude oil and fuel oil and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  The unescorted Finnish steam merchant Hilda was torpedoed and sunk by the U-52, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto Salman, in the Bay of Biscay in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 11 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 1,144 ton Hilda was carrying grain and was headed for Spain.  
   
  The unescorted Dutch steam merchant Berenice was torpedoed and sunk by the U-65, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Gerrit von Stockhausen, in the Bay of Biscay in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 39 died and 8 survivors were picked up by a coastal vessel. The 1,177 ton Berenice was carrying manganese ore and passengers and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Saturday, June 22, 1940  
  Dispersed from Convoy HX-49, the Norwegian motor merchant Randsfjord was torpedoed and sunk by the U-30, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Fritz-Julius Lemp, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 29 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Port Hobart. The 3,999 ton Randsfjord was carrying general cargo, including ammunition and 33 aircraft and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy HX-49, the Norwegian Motor tanker Eli Knudsen was torpedoed and sunk by the U-32, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans Jenisch, 100 miles southwest of Cape Clear, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 37 survived and were picked up by the sloop HMS Sandwich. The 9,026 ton Eli Knudsen was carrying diesel and fuel oil and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The Greek steam merchant Neion was torpedoed and sunk by the U-38, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Liebe, in the Bay of Biscay in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. The 5,154 ton Neion was carrying general cargo and naphtha and was headed for Falmouth, England.  
   
  The unescorted French steam tanker Monique was torpedoed and sunk by the U-65, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Gerrit von Stockhausen, in the Bay of Biscay in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. The 7,011 ton Monique was carrying crude oil and was headed for Le Havre, France.  
   
  Monday, June 24, 1940  
  The unescorted Panamanian steam merchant Cathrine was sunk by gunfire by the U-47, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Prien, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 19 survived. The 1,885 ton Cathrine was carrying general cargo and wheat and was headed for London, England.  
   
  Tuesday, June 25, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy OA-172, the British steam tanker Saranac was torpedoed and sunk by the U-51, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Dietrich Knorr, approximately 270 miles west-southwest of Lands End, England in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 40 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Hurricane (H 06) and the British trawler Caliph. The 12,049 ton Saranac was carrying ballast and was headed for Aruba.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OA-172, the British steam merchant Windsorwood was torpedoed and sunk by the U-51 approximately 370 miles west-southwest of Lands End. Of the ship’s complement, all 40 survived and were picked up by the British steam merchant Ainderby. The 5,395 ton Windsorwood was carrying coal and was headed for Freetown, Sierra Leone.  
   
  Wednesday, June 26, 1940  
  The unescorted Greek steam merchant Dimitris was sunk by gunfire by the U-29, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto Schuhart, off Cape Finisterre off the west coast Spain in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. The 5,254 ton Dimitris was carrying cereals and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Detached from convoy OG-34 the day before, the Norwegian motor merchant Crux was torpedoed and sunk by the UA, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans Cohausz, about 300 miles west of Cape St. Vincent, Portugal in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 30 survived and were picked up by the British steam merchant Brutus. The 3,828 ton Crux was carrying patent fuel and was headed for Rio de Janeiro, Argentina.  
   
  Thursday, June 27, 1940  
  The unescorted Norwegian motor merchant Lenda was sunk by gunfire by the U-47, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Prien, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 27 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Hurricane (H 06) and HMS Havelock (H 88). The 4,005 ton Lenda was carrying timber and was headed for Hull, England.  
   
  The unescorted Dutch steam tanker Leticia was sunk by gunfire by the U-47 in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 28 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Hurricane (H 06). The 2,580 ton Leticia was carrying fuel oil and was headed for Falmouth, England.  
   
  Friday, June 28, 1940  
  The 211 ton British steam trawler Castleton was sunk by the U-102, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Harro von Klot-Heydenfeldt, in the North Sea. All of the ship’s complement of 10 died.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Llanarth was torpedoed and sunk by the U-30, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Fritz-Julius Lemp, about 220 miles west by south of Ushant in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 35 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMS Gladiolus (K 34). The 5,053 ton Llanarth was carrying flour and was headed for Aberdeen, Scotland.  
   
  Saturday, June 29, 1940  
  The Greek steam merchant Frangoula B. Goulandris was sunk by the U-26, commanded by Heinz Scheringer, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. The 6,701 ton Frangoula B. Goulandris was carrying ballast.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Empire Toucan was shelled and then torpedoed and sunk by the U-47, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Prien, about 190 miles southwest of Fastnet, Ireland in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 31 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Hurricane (H 06). The 4,127 ton Empire Toucan was carrying ballast and was headed for Port Sulphur, Louisiana.  
   
  Sunday, June 30, 1940  
  The Norwegian motor merchant Belmoira was torpedoed and sunk by the U-26, commanded by Heinz Scheringer, approximately 250 miles southwest of Lands End, England in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 25 survived and were picked up by the Spanish trawlers Miguel Veiga and Weyler. The 3,214 ton Belmoira was carrying ballast and was headed for Southampton, England.  
   
  The Estonian steam merchant Merkur was torpedoed and sunk by the U-26 approximately 250 miles southwest of Lands End. The 1,291 ton Merkur was carrying ballast and was headed for Acton Grange, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-36, the British steam merchant Avelona Star was torpedoed and sunk by the U-43, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wilhelm Ambrosius, 220 miles northwest of Cape Finisterre off the west coast Spain in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 84 survived. The 13,376 ton Avelona Star was carrying frozen meat and oranges and was headed for London, England.  
   
  The unescorted Greek steam merchant Georgios Kyriakides was torpedoed and sunk by the U-47, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Prien, southwest of Ireland in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 30 survived. The 4,201 ton Georgios Kyriakides was carrying sugar and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-36, the British steam merchant Clan Ogilvy was torpedoed and damaged by the U-65, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Gerrit von Stockhausen, northwest of Cape Finisterre off the west coast Spain in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all survived. The 5,802 ton Clan Ogilvy was carrying general cargo, including tea, groundnuts, chrome, and manganese ore and was bound for London, England.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  Tuesday, June 11, 1940  
  British Prime Minister Churchill, in telegram to U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt sent via the British Embassy in Washington. Churchill again raised the need for destroyers with the Italian entry into the war and the possibility of having to deal with more submarines. "To this," Churchill declared, "the only counter is destroyers. Nothing is so important as for us to have 30 or 40 old destroyers you have already had reconditioned."  
   
  Saturday, June 15, 1940  
  British Prime Minister Churchill, in telegram to U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, again asked for destroyers, calling the matter one "of life and death." Great Britain would carry on the struggle "whatever the odds," the "Former Naval Person" declared to Roosevelt, "but it may well be beyond our resources unless we receive every reinforcement and particularly do we need this reinforcement on the sea."  
     
   
     
   
 

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