August 1940 Events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
  Overview  
  5 Allied war vessels were sunk by U-boats.  
   
  2 U-boats were sunk by Allied warships or by mines.  
   
  54 Allied and neutral merchant ships were sunk by U-boats totaling 268,693 tons.  
  9 Allied merchant ships were damaged by U-boats totaling 69,982 tons.  
   
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Thursday, August 1, 1940  
  The submarine HMS Spearfish (N 69) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-34, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wilhelm Rollmann, about 180 miles west-southwest of Stavanger, Norway in the North Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 41 died and 1 survivors was taken prisoner.  
   
  Wednesday, August 7, 1940  
  The British troop transport Mohamed Ali El-Kebir was torpedoed and sunk by the U-38, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Liebe, about 230 miles west of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 96 died and 766 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Griffin (H 31). The 7,527 ton Mohamed Ali El-Kebir was carrying troops including naval personnel, government stores and mail and was headed for Gibraltar.  
   
  Saturday, August 10, 1940  
  The 16,923 ton armed merchant cruiser HMS Transylvania (F 56) of the 10th Cruiser Squadron on Northern Patrol was torpedoed and sunk by the U-56, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Otto Harms, about 40 miles northwest of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 36 died and 300 survivors were picked up by nearby trawlers rescued about 300 officers and ratings and the armed merchant cruiser HMS Ashanti (F 51).  
   
  Saturday, August 24, 1940  
  While escorting Convoy SC-1 the Sloop HMS Penzance (L 28) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-37, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Victor Oehrn, southwest of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 90 died and 7 survivors were picked up by the Swedish merchant Eknaren.  
   
  Tuesday, August 27, 1940  
  While escorting Convoy SL-43 the 15,007 ton armed merchant cruiser HMS Dunvegan Castle was torpedoed and sunk by the U-46, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Engelbert Endrass, about 120 miles southwest of Cape Clear, Ireland in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 27 died and 250 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Harvester (H 19) and the corvette HMS Primrose (K 91).  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  Thursday, August 1, 1940  
  The U-25, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz Beduhn, was was lost around August 1, 1940 in the North Sea north of Terchelling to British mines, probably in the mine barrage Field No 7. All of the ship’s complement of 49 died. During its career under two commanders the U-25 sank 1 auxiliary warship, 7 merchant ships for a total of 33,209 tons, and damaged 1 merchant ship for a total of 7,638 tons.  
   
  Tuesday, August 20, 1940  
  The U-51, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Dietrich Knorr, was sunk in the Bay of Biscay west of Nantes, France by a torpedo from the submarine HMS Cachalot (N 83). All of the ship’s complement of 43 died. During its career under Kapitänleutnant Knorr the U-51 sank 1 auxiliary warship and 5 merchant ships for a total of 26,296 tons.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Thursday, August 1, 1940  
  The unescorted Swedish steam merchant Sigyn was torpedoed and sunk by the U-59, commanded by Joachim Matz, north of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 23 survived. The 1,981 ton Sigyn was carrying pit props and was headed for Sunderland, England.  
   
  Friday, August 2, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy OB-191, the 8,016 ton British motor tanker Alexia was torpedoed and damaged by the U-99, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto Kretschmer, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. After the Alexia was hit she fell out of the convoy where she was shelled by the same U-99 but did not sink.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-191, the British motor tanker Lucerna was torpedoed and damaged by the U-99 in the northern Atlantic Ocean.. She initially stopped and was later attacked by the U-99 with gunfire, but managed to escape and reached Greenock, Scotland on August 8. Of the ship’s complement, all 30 survived. The 6,556 ton Lucerna was carrying ballast and was bound for Abadan, Iran.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-191, the Norwegian motor tanker Strinda was torpedoed and damaged by the U-99 in the northern Atlantic Ocean.. The 10,973 ton Lucerna was carrying ballast and was bound for Abadan, Iran.  
   
  Saturday, August 3, 1940  
  The unescorted Swedish steam merchant Atos was torpedoed and sunk by the U-57, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Erich Topp, north of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 27 survivors were picked up by the Icelandic trawler Skutull. The 2,161 ton Atos was carrying general cargo and was headed for Petsamo, Finland.  
   
  The unescorted Yugoslavian steam merchant Rad was shelled and then torpedoed and sunk by the submarine UA, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans Cohausz, off the western coast of Africa in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 29 survived and were picked up by the British steam merchant Grodno. The 4,201 ton Rad was carrying chemicals and was headed for Durban, South Africa.  
   
  Sunday, August 4, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy HX-60, the British steam merchant Geraldine Mary was torpedoed and sunk by the U-52, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto Salman, approximately 270 miles west-northwest of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 48D survivors were picked up by a British escort vessel. The 7,244 ton Geraldine Mary was carrying newsprint and sulphite pulp and was headed for Manchester, England.  
   
   Sailing with Convoy HX-60, the British steam merchant Gogovale was torpedoed and sunk by the U-52 approximately 300 miles west-northwest of Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, all 37 survived and were picked up by the destroyer HMS Vanoc (H 33). The 4,586 ton Gogovale was carrying flour and was headed for London, England.  
   
   Sailing with Convoy HX-60, the British steam merchant King Alfred was torpedoed and sunk by the U-52 approximately 300 miles west-northwest of Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 34 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Vanoc (H 33). The 5,272 ton King Alfred was carrying pit props and was headed for Methil, Scotland.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SL-40, the Greek steam merchant Pindos was torpedoed and sunk by the U-58, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Heinrich Schonder, northwest of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 29 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 4,360 ton Pindos was carrying grain and was headed for Avonmouth, England.  
   
  Monday, August 5, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy OB-193, the British steam merchant Boma was torpedoed and sunk by the U-56, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Otto Harms, northwest of Malin Head, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 50 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian motor tanker Vilja. The 5,408 ton Boma was carrying coal and was headed for Lagos, Nigeria.  
   
  Thursday, August 8, 1940  
  The unescorted British motor merchant Upwey Grange was torpedoed and sunk by the U-37, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Victor Oehrn, about 200 miles west of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 36 died and 50 survivors were picked up by the British trawler Naniwa. The 9,130 ton Upwey Grange was carrying passengers, frozen meat, and canned meat and was headed for London, England.  
   
  Friday, August 9, 1940  
  The unescorted Swedish motor merchant Canton was torpedoed and sunk by the U-30, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Fritz-Julius Lemp, sank 70 miles west of Tory Island, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 16 died and 16 survived. The 5,779 ton Canton was carrying pig iron, linseed, general cargo, and hessian and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sunday, August 11, 1940  
  A straggler from Convoy SL-41, the British steam merchant Llanfair was torpedoed and sunk by the U-38, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Liebe, west of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 30 survivors were picked up by the American merchant California. The 4,966 ton Llanfair was carrying sugar and was headed for Avonmouth, England.  
   
  Tuesday, August 13, 1940  
  A straggler from Convoy HX-62, the Swedish steam merchant Nils Gorthon was torpedoed and sunk by the U-60, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Adalbert Schnee, 25 miles north-northeast of Malin Head, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 16 survivors were picked up by the Icelandic trawler Helgafell. The 1,787N ton Nils Gorthon was carrying wood pulp and was headed for Ridham Dock, England.  
   
  Wednesday, August 14, 1940  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Betty was torpedoed and sunk by the U-59, commanded by Joachim Matz, 35 miles from Tory Island, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 30 died and 4 survivors were picked up by the minesweeping trawler HMS Man o´ War (FY 104). The 2,339 ton Betty was carrying rice and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Thursday, August 15, 1940  
  A straggler from Convoy HX-62, the British motor tanker Sylvafield was torpedoed and sunk by the U-51, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Dietrich Knorr, 190 miles west-northwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 36 survivors were picked up by the minesweeping trawler HMS Newland. The 5,709 ton Sylvafield was carrying fuel oil and was headed for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  The unescorted Greek steam merchant Aspasia was torpedoed and sunk by the submarine UA, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans Cohausz, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 19 died. The 4,211 ton Aspasia was carrying manganese ore and was headed for Workington, England.  
   
  Friday, August 16, 1940  
  A straggler from Convoy OA-198, the British motor merchant Empire Merchant was torpedoed and sunk by the U-100, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Joachim Schepke, about 190 miles west of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 48 survivors were picked up by the rescue tug HMS Salvonia (W 43). The 4,864 ton Empire Merchant was carrying general cargo and mail and was headed for Kingston, Jamaica.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-197, the British steam merchant Clan Macphee was torpedoed and sunk by the U-30, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Fritz-Julius Lemp, about 350 miles west of North Uist, Outer Hebrides in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 67 died and 41 survivors were picked up by the Hungarian steam merchant Kelet and the Norwegian steam merchant Varegg. The 6,628 ton Clan Macphee was carrying general cargo and was headed for Bombay, India.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-197, the Swedish steam merchant Hedrun was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans Rudolf Rösing, about 70 miles west of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 21 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Empire Soldier. The 2,325 ton Hedrun was carrying coal and was headed for Newport, Rhode Island.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-197, the Dutch motor merchant Alcinous was torpedoed and damaged by the U-46, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Engelbert Endrass, approximately 150 miles southwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The 6,189 ton Alcinous was carrying general cargo and was bound for Java.  
   
  Monday, August 19, 1940  
  A straggler from Convoy OA-199, the British steam merchant Ampleforth was torpedoed and sunk by the U-101, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Fritz Frauenheim, west of the Hebrides in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 9 died and 29 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Warwick (D 25). The 4,576 ton Ampleforth was carrying ballast and was headed for Jacksonville, Florida.  
   
  The Belgian steam passenger ship Ville de Gand was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans Rudolf Rösing, about 200 miles west of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 15 died and 38 survived. The 7,590 ton Ville de Gand was carrying shell bullets and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The Hungarian steam merchant Kelet was torpedoed and sunk by the submarine UA, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans Cohausz, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and survivors picked up from the Clan Macphee, 6 died and 68 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian merchant Varegg. The 4,295 ton Kelet was carrying ballast and was headed for Tampa, Florida.  
   
  Tuesday, August 20, 1940  
  The unescorted Greek steam merchant Leonidas M. Valmas was torpedoed and damaged beyond repair by the U-46, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Engelbert Endrass, northwest of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 16 died. The 2,080 ton Leonidas M. Valmas was carrying timber, boards and battens and was headed for Dublin, Ireland.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy OB-198, the Panamanian steam merchant Tuira was torpedoed and sunk by the submarine UA, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans Cohausz, southwest of Rockall in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died. The 4,397 ton Tuira was carrying coal and was headed for Rosario, Argentina.  
   
  Friday, August 23, 1940  
  Dispersed from Convoy OA-200, the Norwegian steam merchant Keret was torpedoed and sunk by the U-37, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Victor Oehrn, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 13 died and 7 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Trident. The 1,718 ton Keret was carrying ballast and was headed for Sydney, Nova Scotia.  
   
   Dispersed from Convoy OA-200, the British steam merchant Severn Leigh was torpedoed and sunk by the U-37 in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 33 died and 10 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 5,242 ton Severn Leigh was carrying ballast and was headed for St. John, New Brunswick.  
   
  Saturday, August 24, 1940  
  Dispersed from Convoy OA-200, the British steam merchant Brookwood was torpedoed and sunk by the U-37, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Victor Oehrn, south of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 36 survivors were picked up by the British merchant Clan Macbean. The 5,100 ton Brookwood was carrying ballast and was headed for Sydney, Nova Scotia.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-65, the British steam tanker La Brea was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans Rudolf Rösing, west-northwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 31 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 6,666 ton La Brea was carrying fuel oil and was headed for Dundee, Scotland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-202, the British Steam merchant Cumberland was torpedoed and sunk by the U-57, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Erich Topp, 25 miles northeast of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 54 survivors were reached land by lifeboat. The 10,939 ton Cumberland was carrying general cargo including metal and was headed for Port Chalmers, New Zealand.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-202, the British Steam merchant Saint Dunstan was torpedoed and sunk by the U-5725 miles northeast of Irelandf the ship’s complement, 14 died and 49 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Copeland. The 5,681 ton Saint Dunstan was carrying ballast and was headed for Baltimore, Maryland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-202, the British steam merchant Havildar was torpedoed and damaged by the U-57 25 miles northeast of Malin Head. The 5,407 ton Havildar was carrying general cargo and was bound for Rangoon, Burma.  
   
  Sunday, August 25, 1940  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Jamaica Pioneer was torpedoed and sunk by the U-100, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Joachim Schepke, east of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 55 survivors were picked up by the destroyers HMS Anthony (H 40) and HMS Wanderer (D 74). The 5,471 ton Jamaica Pioneer was carrying bananas and was headed for Avonmouth, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-65A, the British Steam merchant Fircrest was torpedoed and sunk by the U-124, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg-Wilhelm Schulz, north of the Hebrides in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 39 died. The 5,394 ton Fircrest was carrying iron ore and was headed for Middlesbrough, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-65A, the British Steam merchant Harpalyce was torpedoed and sunk by the U-124 north of the Hebrides. Of the ship’s complement, 42 died and 4 survivors were picked up by the armed trawler HMS Fort Dee. The 5,169 ton Harpalyce was carrying steel and was headed for Hull, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-65A, the British steam merchant Stakesby was torpedoed and damaged by the U-124 north of Butt of Lewis, Hebrides. Of the ship’s complement, all 36 survived. The 3,900 ton Stakesby was carrying pit props and was bound for Tyne, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-1, the British steam merchant Blairmore was torpedoed and sunk by the U-37, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Victor Oehrn, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 36 survivors were picked up by the Swedish motor merchant Eknaren. The 4,141 ton Blairmore was carrying timber and was headed for Tyne, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy OB-201, the British steam merchant Yewcrest was sunk by gunfire by the U-37 southwest of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 38 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Highlander (H 44). The 3,774 ton Yewcrest was carrying ballast and was headed for Wabana, Newfoundland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-65A, the British motor tanker Athelcrest was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans Rudolf Rösing, northeast of Scotland. Of the ship’s complement, 30 died and 6 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Godetia (K 72). The 6,825 ton Athelcrest was carrying diesel oil and was headed for London, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-65A, the British steam merchant Empire Merlin was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48 northeast of Scotland. Of the ship’s complement, 35 died and 1 survivor were picked up by the corvette HMS Godetia (K 72). The 5,763 ton Empire Merlin was carrying sulphur and was headed for Hull, England. www.uboat.net.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-65B, the British motor tanker Pecten was torpedoed and sunk by the U-57, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Erich Topp, about 75 miles north of Tory Island, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 49 died and 8 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Torr Head. The 7,468 ton Pecten was carrying Admiralty fuel oil and was headed for Clyde, United Kingdom.  
   
  Tuesday, August 27, 1940  
  A straggler from Convoy SC-1, the Norwegian steam merchant Eva was torpedoed and sunk by the U-28, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günter Kuhnke, about 60 miles east of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 17 survivors reached land by lifeboat/. The 1,599 ton Eva was carrying lumber and was headed for Sharpness, England. For more information on these vessels visit the Eva and the U-28 pages on www.uboat.net.  
   
  The unescorted Greek steam merchant Theodoros T. was torpedoed and sunk by the U-37, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Victor Oehrn, southwest of Ireland in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. The 3,409 ton Theodoros T. was carrying maize and was headed for Cardiff, Wales. For more information on these vessels visit the Theodoros T. and the U-37 pages on www.uboat.net.  
   
  Wednesday, August 28, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy SC-1, the Finnish steam merchant Elle was torpedoed and sunk by the U-101, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Fritz Frauenheim, northwest of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 27 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Leith (L 36). The 3,868 ton Elle was carrying spoolwood and was headed for Ardrossan, Scotland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-66, the British Steam merchant Kyno was torpedoed and sunk by the U-28, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günter Kuhnke, about 30 miles north-northeast of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 33D survivors were picked up by the British motor merchant Queen Maud. The 3,946 ton Kyno was carrying general cargo and was headed for Hull, England.  
   
  Thursday, August 29, 1940  
  The British steam merchant Dalblair was torpedoed and sunk by the U-100, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Joachim Schepke, 150 miles northwest of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 41 died. The 4,608 ton Dalblair was carrying ballast and was headed for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy OA-204, the Swedish steam merchant Alida Gorthon was torpedoed and sunk by the U-100 approximately 250 miles northwest of Tory Island, Ireland. Of the ship’s complement and survivors picked up from the British steam merchant Dalblair, 31 died and 13 survived. The 2,373 ton Alida Gorthon was carrying ballast and was headed for St. John’s, Newfoundland.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy OA-204, the British steam merchant Empire Moose was torpedoed and sunk by the U-100 approximately 130 miles west-northwest of Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, all 36 survived reached land by lifeboat. The 6,103 ton Empire Moose was carrying ballast and was headed for Port Sulphur, Louisiana.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OA-204, the British steam merchant Hartismere was torpedoed and damaged by the U-100northwest of Bloody Foreland, Ireland. The 5,498 ton Hartismere was carrying ballast.  
   
  Friday, August 30, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy HX-66A, the British steam merchant Chelsea was torpedoed and sunk by the U-32, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans Jenisch, 60 miles west-northwest of Cape Wrath, Scotland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 24 died and 11 survivors were picked up by the armed trawler HMS Lord Cecil. The 4,804 ton Chelsea was carrying maize and was headed for London, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-66A, the British steam merchant Mill Hill was torpedoed and sunk by the U-32 60 miles west-northwest of Cape Wrath. All of the ship’s complement of 34 died. The 4,318 ton Mill Hill was carrying pig iron and steel and was headed for Middlesbrough, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-66A, the Norwegian motor merchant Norne was torpedoed and sunk by the U-32, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans Jenisch, 60 miles west-northwest of Cape Wrath, Scotland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 17 died and 11 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Hibiscus (K 24). The 3,971 ton Norne was carrying scrap iron and was headed for Grangemouth, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-205, the Greek steam merchant San Gabriel was torpedoed and damaged beyond repair by the U-59, commanded by Joachim Matz, north of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 22 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Warwick (D 25). The 4,943 ton San Gabriel was carrying ballast and was headed for Buenos Aires, Argentina.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-205, the British motor tanker Anadara was torpedoed and damaged by the U-59 north of Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, all survived. The 8,009 ton Anadara was carrying ballast and was bound for Corpus Christi, Texas.  
   
  Saturday, August 31, 1940  
  A straggler from Convoy OB-205, the British Steam merchant Har Zion was torpedoed and sunk by the U-38, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Liebe, northwest of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 34 died and 1 survivor were picked up by the Polish destroyer ORP Blyskawica (H 34). The 2,508 ton Har Zion was carrying alcohol and fertilizer and was headed for Savannah, Georgia.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed Belgian steam passenger ship Ville de Hasselt was torpedoed and sunk by the U-46, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Engelbert Endrass, about 100 miles northwest of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 53 survived and were picked up by the Belgian steam trawler Transport and the Icelandic steam trawlers Egill Skallagrímsson and Hilmir. The 7,461 ton Ville de Hasselt was carrying general cargo and was headed for Boston, Massachusetts.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-205, the British steam merchant Bibury was torpedoed and sunk by the U-59, commanded by Joachim Matz, northwest of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 39 died. The 4,616 ton Bibury was carrying coal and was headed for Buenos Aires, Argentina.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-205, the Dutch steam passenger ship Volendam was torpedoed and damaged by the U-60, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Adalbert Schnee, about 200 miles west of the Bloody Foreland, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The Volendam had been assigned to the child evacuation program and was carrying 879 people composed of 273 crew members, 320 children with their leaders, and 286 other passengers. When it became necessary to abandon ship there was no problem because this had been practiced in port. The children sang “Roll out the Barrel” until they were rescued by three other ships of the convoy and brought back to Britain. The only casualty was a crewman, who drowned when he fell overboard. The 15,434 ton Volendam was also carrying general cargo and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  Thursday, August 1, 1940  
  The Italian Royal Navy established its BETASOM submarine base in Bordeaux, in the German occupation zone of the southwestern coast of France. The Italians were allocated a sector of the Atlantic south of Lisbon to patrol.  
   
  Friday, August 2, 1940  
  U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt and his cabinet had a "long discussion" in a cabinet meeting concerning "ways and means to sell directly or indirectly" 50 or 60 destroyers to the British. There was no dissent "that the survival of the British Isles under German attack might very possibly depend on their [the British] getting these destroyers." All present agreed that legislation to accomplish that goal was necessary.  
   
  Monday, August 5, 1940  
  Lord Lothian, British Ambassador to the U.S., provided U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt with a note concerning the facilities which the British were prepared to "extend to the United States Government..." in return for 50 to 60 old destroyers.  
   
  Rear Admiral John W. Greenslade and French Vice Admiral Georges A.M.J. Robert concluded an agreement concerning the status of Vichy French warships and aircraft in the French West Indies. The ships in question were the aircraft carrier Bearn, light cruiser Emile Bertin, training cruiser Jeanne d'Arc and auxiliary cruisers Esterelle, Quercy, and Barfleur. Aircraft concerned were 44 SBC-4s, 15 Hawk 75s (an export version of USAAC P-36) and 6 Belgian Brewster fighters (an export version of USN F2A).  
   
  Tuesday, August 13, 1940  
  U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt conferred with U.S. Secretary of the Navy William "Frank" Knox, Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson, Secretary of the Treasury Henry Morgenthau, and Undersecretary of State Sumner Welles concerning the transfer of destroyers to Britain. Consequently, Roosevelt informed British Prime Minister Churchill (in a telegram sent from Acting Secretary of State Sumner Welles to U.S. Ambassador Joseph P. Kennedy) that among other items previously sought "it may be possible to furnish to the British Government... at least 50 destroyers..." Roosevelt stated, though, that such aid could only be given provided that "the American People and the Congress frankly recognized in return...the national defense and security of the United States would be enhanced." The President thus insisted that (1) should British waters be rendered untenable the British Fleet would be sent to other parts of the Empire (and neither turned over to the Germans nor sunk) and (2) that the British government would grant authorization to use Newfoundland, Bermuda, the Bahamas, Jamaica, St. Lucia, Trinidad and British Guiana as naval and air bases, and to acquire land there through 99-year leases to establish those bases.  
   
  Thursday, August 15, 1940  
  British Prime Minister Churchill responded, encouraged and grateful, to U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt's telegram of August 13, 1940: "the worth of every destroyer that you can spare to us is measured in rubies... The "moral value of this fresh aid from your Government and your people at this critical time will be very great and widely felt."  
   
  Friday, August 16, 1940  
  U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, in a press conference, announced that the U.S. government was discussing with the British government for the acquisition of naval and air bases to defend the Western Hemisphere and the Panama Canal. Secrecy, however, continued to shroud the ongoing discussions concerning the transfer of destroyers to the British.  
   
  Saturday, August 17, 1940  
  The German government announced a “total blockade” of Great Britain: “Germany, having repeatedly warned these [neutral] States not to send their ships into the waters around the British Isles, has now again requested, in a note, these governments to forbid their ships from entering the Anglo-German war zones. It is in the interest of these States themselves to accede to this German request as soon as possible. The Reich Government wishes to emphasize the following fact: The naval war in the waters around the British Isles is in full progress. The whole area had been mined.”  
   
  Tuesday, August 27, 1940  
  U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt conferred with Secretary of the Navy Knox, Secretary of War Stimson and Secretary of State Hull concerning a compromise to resolve the impasse that has arisen over the proposed destroyers-for-bases agreement. Subsequently, Roosevelt met with Admiral Harold R. Stark, Chief of Naval Operations, Secretary of the Navy Knox and Secretary of State Hull, and British Ambassador Lord Lothian. These men reviewed the proposal arrived at earlier that day. Admiral Stark certified that the destroyers involved were no longer essential to the defense of the United States, thus clearing the way for their transfer.  
   
  U.S. Attorney General Robert H. Jackson delivered to U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt a ruling in which the legal framework for the transfer of destroyers to the British could be accomplished.  
   
  Coastal Command of the RAF began operating from an air base in Iceland to help in convoy protection. Only outdated Fairey Battle aircraft were available at this time.  
     
   
     
   
 

The objective of WW2Timelines.com is to provide a day by day account of the events that lead up to and were part of the greatest conflict known to mankind. There are accounts for the activities of each particular day and timelines for subjects and personalities. It is the of this website intent to provide an unbiased account of the war. Analysis, effects caused by an event, or prior or subsequent pertinent events are presented separately and indicated as text that is italicized.

 
   
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