September 1940 Events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
  Overview  
  1 Allied war vessel was sunk by a U-boat.  
  1 Allied war vessel was damaged by a U-boat.  
   
  1 U-boat sank due to an accident.  
   
  56 Allied and neutral merchant ships were sunk by U-boats totaling 284,092 tons.  
  4 Allied merchant ships were damaged by U-boats totaling 22,617 tons.  
   
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Sunday, September 1, 1940  
  The light cruiser HMS Fiji (58)was torpedoed and damaged by the U-32, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans Jenisch, approximately 40 miles north-northeast of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean as the HMS Fiji was escorting convoy MP (Part of the Operation Menace, the Anglo French attack on Dakar). Of the ship’s complement 5 men died.  
   
  Sunday, September 15, 1940  
  While escorting Convoy SC-3, the sloop HMS Dundee (L 84) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bleichrodt, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 12 died and the survivors were picked up by the Norwegian steam merchants Vigsnes , Granfoss and Fido and the destroyer HMS Wanderer (D 74).  
   
  Monday, September 23, 1940  
  The Norwegian freighter Tirranna, captured by the German commerce raider Atlantis on June 6, was sunk off the coast of France near Bordeaux by the submarine HMS Tuna. The Tirranna was carrying 274 prisoners and a nineteen-man prize crew. 86 of the captured prisoners and one of the prize crew were killed.  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  Tuesday, September 3, 1940  
  The U-57, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Erich Topp, sank at Brunsbüttel, Germany after an accidental collision with the Norwegian steamship Rona. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 19 survived. The U-57 was raised in September 1940. It was then repaired and returned to service on January 11, 1941.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Sunday, September 1, 1940  
  A straggler from Convoy OB-205, the Greek steam merchant Efploia was torpedoed and sunk by the U-101, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Fritz Frauenheim, northwest of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The survivors were picked up later that day by destroyer HMS Anthony (H 40), which scuttled the wreck by gunfire. The 3,867 ton Efploia was carrying ballast and was headed for Father Point, Quebec.  
   
  Monday, September 2, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy OB-206, the British steam merchant Thornlea was torpedoed and sunk by the U-46, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Engelbert Endrass, about 200 miles west of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 33 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMCS Skeena (D 59). The 4,261 ton Thornlea was carrying of coal and was headed for Montreal, Canada.  
   
  The unescorted Belgian steam passenger ship Ville de Mons was torpedoed and sunk by the U-47, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Prien, northeast of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 54 survived. The 7,463 ton Ville de Mons was carrying general cargo, pears, corn, and wheat and was headed for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  Tuesday, September 3, 1940  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Ulva was torpedoed and sunk by the U-60, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Adalbert Schnee, about 180 miles west-northwest of Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 17 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 1,401 ton Ulva was carrying coal and was headed for Gibraltar.  
   
  Wednesday, September 4, 1940  
  The unescorted and neutral Irish steam merchant Luimneach was sunk by gunfire by the U-46, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Engelbert Endrass, west-southwest of the Scilly Isles in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 18 survived and were picked up by a French fishing boat except for the three men who were taken prisoner. The 1,074 ton Luimneach was carrying pyrites and was headed for Drogheda, Ireland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OA-207, the British steam merchant Titan was torpedoed and sunk by the U-47, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Prien, about 80 miles southwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 89 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMCS St. Laurent (H 83). The 9,035 ton Titan was carrying Ballast and was headed for Sydney, Nova Scotia.  
   
  Saturday, September 7, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy SC-2, the British steam merchant José de Larrinaga was torpedoed and sunk by the U-47, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Prien, northwest of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 40 died. The 5,303 ton José de Larrinaga was carrying steel and linseed oil and was headed for Newport, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-2, the British steam merchant Neptunian was torpedoed and sunk by the U-47 northwest of Ireland. All of the ship’s complement of 36 died. The 5,303 ton Neptunian was carrying sugar and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-2, the Norwegian steam merchant Gro was torpedoed and sunk by the U-47 northwest of Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, 11 died and 21 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Burdwan. The 4,211 ton Gro was carrying wheat and was headed for Manchester, England.  
   
  Monday, September 9, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy SC-2, the British steam merchant Mardinian was torpedoed and sunk by the U-28, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günter Kuhnke, about 100 miles north-northwest of Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 32 survivors were picked up by the ASW trawler HMS St. Apollo and the armed merchant cruiser HMS Aurania (F 28). The 2,434 ton Mardinian was carrying pitch and was headed for London, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-2, the Greek steam merchant Possidon was torpedoed and sunk by the U-47, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Prien, northwest of Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, 17 died. The 3,840 ton Possidon was carrying sulfur phosphate and was headed for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  Wednesday, September 11, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy OA-210, the British steam merchant Maas was torpedoed and sunk by the U-28, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günter Kuhnke, southwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 20D died and 2 survived. The 1,966 ton Maas was carrying ballast and was headed for Rimouski, Quebec.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OA-210, the British steam Harpenden merchant was torpedoed and damaged by the U-28 southwest of Rockall. The 4,678 ton Harpenden was carrying ballast and was bound for St. Lawrence, Quebec.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Albionic was torpedoed and sunk by the U-99, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto Kretschmer, south-southeast of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 25 died. The 2,468 ton Albionic was carrying iron ore and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sunday, September 15, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy SC-3, the Greek steam merchant Alexandros was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bleichrodt, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 25 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Wanderer (D 74). The 4,343 ton Alexandros was carrying timber and paper and was headed for Sharpness, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-3, the British steam merchant Empire Volunteer was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48 in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 33 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian merchant Fido and the Norwegian merchant Granli. The 5,319 ton Empire Volunteer was carrying iron ore and was headed for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-70, the Norwegian motor merchant Hird was torpedoed and sunk by the U-65, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Gerrit von Stockhausen, about 180 miles from Barra Head, Scotland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 30 survived and were picked up by the Icelandic trawler Þórólfur. The 4,950 ton Hir was carrying general cargo, including resin, lumber and black carbon and was headed for Manchester, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SC-3, the Canadian steam merchant Kenordoc was stopped by gunfire by the U-99, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto Kretschmer, about 44 miles west-northwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The Kenordoc was later scuttled by the destroyer HMS Amazon (D 39). Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 13 survivors were picked up by the HMS Amazon and the destroyer HMCS St. Laurent (H 83). The 1,780 ton Kenordoc was carrying timber and was headed for Bristol, England.  
   
  Monday, September 16, 1940  
  A straggler from Convoy SC-3, the Norwegian steam merchant Lotos was torpedoed and sunk by the U-99, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto Kretschmer, 15 miles northwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 17 survived and reached land by lifeboat. The 1,327 ton Lotos was carrying timber and was headed for River Tyne, England.  
   
  Tuesday, September 17, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy HX-71, the British steam merchant Tregenna was torpedoed and sunk by the U-65, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Gerrit von Stockhausen, 78 miles northwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 33 died and 4 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Filleigh. The 5,242 ton Tregenna was carrying steel and was headed for Newport, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-71, the British steam merchant Crown Arun was torpedoed and then sunk by gunfire by the U-99, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto Kretschmer, north of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 25 survived and were picked up by the destroyer HMS Winchelsea (D 46). The 2,372 ton Crown Arun was carrying pit props and was headed for Hull, England.  
   
  Wednesday, September 18, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy OB-213, the British steam passenger ship City of Benares was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bleichrodt, approximately 250 miles west-southwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 260 died and 147 survivors were picked up by the destroyers HMS Hurricane (H 06) and HMS Anthony (H 40). The 11,081 ton City of Benares was carrying passengers and was headed for Montreal, Canada. The City of Benares was carrying 90 evacuated children, which had been on their way to Canada to escape the German air attacks on Britain. 77 of them lost their lives. After this incident, no more children were sent overseas.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-213, the British steam merchant Marina was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48 approximately 250 miles west-southwest of Rockall. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 37 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Hurricane (H 06) and the British merchant Carlingford. The 5,088 ton Marina was carrying general cargo, including coal and was headed for River Plate, Argentina.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SC-3, the British steam merchant Magdalena was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bleichrodt, south of Iceland. All of the ship’s complement of 31 died. The 3,118 ton Magdalena was carrying iron ore and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Friday, September 20, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy OB-216, the Panamanian steam merchant Boka was torpedoed and sunk by the U-138, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See U-138, northwest of Rathlin Island, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 26 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Arabis (K 73). The 5,560 ton Boka was carrying coal and was headed for Takoradi, Ghana.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-216, the British steam passenger ship City of Simla was torpedoed and sunk by the U-138northwest of Rathlin Island. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 3 died and 347 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Guinean and the Belgian trawler Van Dyke. The 10,138 ton City of Simla was carrying passengers and general cargo and was headed for Bombay, India.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-216, the British whale factory ship New Sevilla was torpedoed and sunk by the U-138 approximately 50 miles northwest of Rathlin Island. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 282 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Arabis (K 73) and the Icelandic trawler Belgaum. The 13,801 ton New Sevilla was carrying whaling stores and ballast and was headed for South Georgia Island.  
   
  Saturday, September 21, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy HX-72, the British steam merchant Canonesa was torpedoed and sunk by the U-100, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Joachim Schepke, approximately 340 miles west of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 62 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS La Malouine (K 46). The 8,286 ton Canonesa was carrying refrigerated and general cargo, including bacon, cheese, fish, and ham and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-72, the British steam merchant Dalcairn was torpedoed and sunk by the U-100 approximately 340 miles west of Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, all 48 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMS La Malouine (K 46). The 4,608 ton Dalcairn was carrying wheat and was headed for Hull, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-72, the British motor tanker Torinia was torpedoed and sunk by the U-100 approximately 340 miles west of Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, all 55 survived and were picked up by the destroyer HMS Skate (H 39). The 10,364 ton Torinia was carrying Admiralty fuel oil and was headed for Clyde, United Kingdom.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-72, the British steam merchant Blairangus was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bleichrodt, south of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 28 survivors were picked up by the British merchant Pikepool. The 4,409 ton Blairangus was carrying timber and was headed for Methil, Scotland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-72, the British steam merchant Broompark was torpedoed and damaged by the U-48 south of Iceland. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 40 survived. The 5,136 ton Broompark was carrying lumber and metal and was bound for Glasgow, Scotland. For more information on these vessels visit the Broompark and the U-48 pages on www.uboat.net.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-72, the British steam merchant Baron Blythswood was torpedoed and sunk by the U-99, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto Kretschmer, south of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 34 died. The 3,668 ton Baron Blythswood was carrying iron ore and was headed for Port Talbot, Wales.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-72, the British motor merchant Elmbank was was shelled and then torpedoed and sunk by the U-99 south of Iceland. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 54 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Pikepool. The 5,156 ton Elmbank was carrying general cargo, including timber and metals and was headed for Belfast, Ireland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-72, the British motor tanker Invershannon was torpedoed and sunk by the U-99 480 miles west of Bloody Foreland, Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, 16 died and 32 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Flamingo and the armed trawler HMS Fandango (T 107). The 9,154 ton Invershannon was carrying Admiralty fuel oil and was headed for Scapa Flow, Scotland.  
   
  Sunday, September 22, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy HX-72, the British steam merchant Empire Airman was torpedoed and damaged by the U-100, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Joachim Schepke, about 340 miles west of Bloody Foreland, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The ship was taken in tow but sank on September 23, 1940. Of the ship’s complement, 33 died and 4 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS La Malouine (K 46). The 6,586 ton Empire Airman was carrying iron ore and was headed for Cardiff, Wales.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-72, the British motor tanker Frederick S. Fales was torpedoed and sunk by the U-100, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Joachim Schepke, approximately 340 miles west of Bloody Foreland, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 11 died and 32 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS La Malouine (K 46). The 10,525 ton Frederick S. Fales was carrying Admiralty fuel oil and was headed for Clyde, United Kingdom.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-72, the British steam merchant Scholar was torpedoed and sunk by the U-100 approximately 340 miles west of Bloody Foreland. Of the ship’s complement, all 45 survived and were picked up by the destroyer HMS Skate (H 39). The 3,940 ton Scholar was carrying cotton, steel, arsenic, wood pulp, and lumber and was headed for Manchester, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-72, the Norwegian steam merchant Simla was torpedoed and sunk by the U-100 approximately 600 miles west of Inishtrahull, Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, all 31 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMS Heartsease (K 15). The 6,031 ton Simla was carrying scrap metal and steel and was headed for Methil, Scotland.  
   
  The 81 ton Faroese fishing ship Union Jack was sunk by gunfire by the U-31, commanded by Wilfried Prellberg, about 100 miles northwest by north of Butt of Lewis, Hebrides in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 7 survived and reached land by lifeboat.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-72, the British steam merchant Collegian was torpedoed and damaged by the U-32, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans Jenisch, approximately 320 miles west of Malin Head, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The 7,886 ton Collegian was carrying general cargo, including cotton, steel, and lumber and was bound for Belfast, Ireland.  
   
  Wednesday, September 25, 1940  
  Dispersed from convoy OB-217, the British motor merchant Eurymedon was torpedoed and sunk by the U-29, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto Schuhart, about 365 miles west of Achill Head, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 29 died and 64 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMCS Ottawa (H 60). The 6,223 ton Eurymedon was carrying general cargo and passengers and was headed for Java.  
   
  Dispersed from convoy OB-216, the British steam merchant Mabriton was torpedoed and sunk by the U-32, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans Jenisch, west-southwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 12 died and 25 survivors were picked up by the survey ship HMS Jason and the sloop HMS Rochester (L 50). The 6,694 ton Mabriton was carrying ballast and was headed for Father Point, New Brunswick.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-217, the British steam merchant Sulairia was torpedoed and sunk by the U-43, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wilhelm Ambrosius, about 355 miles west of Achill Head, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 56 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMCS Ottawa (H 60). The 5,802 ton Sulairia was carrying general cargo and livestock and was headed for Montreal, Canada.  
   
  Thursday, September 26, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy OB-218, the British steam merchant Manchester Brigade was torpedoed and sunk by the U-137, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Herbert Wohlfarth, west of Malin Head, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 56 died and 4 survivors were picked up by the French hospital ship Canada. The 6,042 ton Manchester Brigade was carrying government and general cargo and was headed for Montreal, Canada.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-218, the British steam tanker Stratford was torpedoed and sunk by the U-137 85 miles west-southwest of Bloody Foreland, Ireland8). The 4,753 ton Stratford was carrying ballast and was headed for Aruba.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-217, the British steam merchant Darcoila was torpedoed and sunk by the U-32, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans Jenisch, west of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 31 died. The 4,084 ton Darcoila was carrying ballast and was headed for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-217, the Norwegian motor merchant Tancred was torpedoed and sunk by the U-32 approximately 600 miles west-northwest of Valencia, Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, all 36 survived and were picked up by the Norwegian motor merchant Tricolor. The 6,094 ton Tancred was carrying ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy OG-43, the British steam merchant Coast Wings was torpedoed and sunk by the U-46, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Engelbert Endrass, southwest of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 16 died. The 862 ton Coast Wings was carrying general cargo and was headed for Lisbon, Portugal.  
   
  The Swedish steam merchant Siljan was torpedoed and sunk by the U-46 approximately 350 miles southwest of Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, 9 died and 18 survived. The 3,058 ton Siljan was carrying coal and was headed for Lisbon, Portugal.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-218, the British steam merchant Ashantian was torpedoed and damaged by the U-137, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Herbert Wohlfarth, west of Malin Head, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 38 survived. The 4,917 ton Ashantian was carrying general cargo, including mines and explosives and was bound for Freetown, Sierra Leone.  
   
  Friday, September 27, 1940  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-218, the Norwegian motor merchant Vestvard was torpedoed and sunk by the U-31, commanded by Wilfried Prellberg, about 300 miles west of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 30 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 4,319 ton Vestvard was carrying ballast and was headed for Montreal, Canada.  
   
  The unescorted Egyptian steam merchant Georges Mabro was torpedoed and sunk by the U-37, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Victor Oehrn, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement died. The 2,555 ton Georges Mabro was headed for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  Saturday, September 28, 1940  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-218, the British steam merchant Empire Ocelot was torpedoed and then sunk by gunfire by the U-32, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans Jenisch, southwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 32 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Havelock (H 88). The 5,759 ton Empire Ocelot was carrying ballast and was headed for Baltimore, Maryland.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-217, the British steam merchant Corrientes was torpedoed and sunk by the U-37, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Victor Oehrn, about 600 miles west of Achill Head, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 50 survived and were picked up by the wedish motor merchant Kolsnaren. The 6,863 ton Corrientes was carrying general cargo and bricks and was headed for Montreal, Canada.  
   
  Sunday, September 29, 1940  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-218, the British steam merchant Bassa was torpedoed and sunk by the U-32, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans Jenisch, southwest of Rockall. All of the ship’s complement of 50 died. The 5,267 ton Bassa was carrying ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Monday, September 30, 1940  
  A straggler from Convoy OB-220, the British steam merchant Heminge was torpedoed and sunk by the U-37, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Victor Oehrn, west of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 25 survivors were picked up by the British merchant Clan Cumming. The 2,499 ton Heminge was carrying coal and was headed for Tenerife, Spain.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Samala was torpedoed and sunk by the U-37 west of Ireland. All of the ship’s complement of 68 died. The 5,390 ton Samala was carrying bananas and was headed for Garston, England.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  Monday, September 1, 1940  
  U.S. Secretary of State Cordell Hull and British Ambassador Lord Lothian exchanged notes concluding the agreement to trade destroyers for bases. The U.S. would provide, by executive agreement, 50 over-age (World War I Emergency Program) destroyers in return for 99-year leases on bases in the Bahamas, Antigua, St. Lucia, Trinidad, Jamaica, and British Guiana. The British provided bases at Newfoundland and Bermuda as outright gifts.  
   
  Wednesday, September 3, 1940  
  U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt announced the "destroyers-for-bases" agreement. Commander Destroyers, Atlantic Squadron, Captain Ferdinand L. Reichmuth, was placed in charge of the transfer operation.  
   
  The light cruiser USS St. Louis (CL 49) set sail from Norfolk, Virginia bound for Hamilton, Bermuda with the Greenslade Board aboard. The Greenslade Board was a committee formed "to make a comprehensive study of the shore establishment (naval and commercial) necessary to support the Fleet in peace and war." With the strategic requirements of the fleet in mind, the board was instructed to make recommendations for additional facilities in new locations and as to the expansion, limitation, contraction, abandonment, or conversion of existing shore facilities. The board was known by its senior member, Rear Admiral John W. Greenslade.  
   
  Friday, September 5, 1940  
  Light cruiser St. Louis (CL-49) arrived at Hamilton, Bermuda with the Greenslade Board aboard.  
   
  Friday, September 6, 1940  
  The first group of U.S. ships involved in the destroyers-for-bases transfer to Great Britain arrived at Halifax, Nova Scotia. Royal Navy crews assigned to the destroyers arrived simultaneously. This group included the USS Aaron Ward (DD 132), USS Buchanan (DD 131), USS Crowninshield (DD 134), USS Hale (DD 133), USS Abel P. Upshur (DD 193), USS Welborn C. Wood (DD 195), USS Herndon (DD 198), and Welles (DD 257).  
   
  Sunday, September 8, 1940  
  The light cruiser St. Louis (CL 49) departed Hamilton, Bermuda for Norfolk, Virginia with the Greenslade Board aboard.  
   
  Monday, September 9, 1940  
  Germany warned that all ships in war zones prescribed by the Axis were subject to attack “regardless of nationality.”  
   
  The first group of U.S. ships involved in the destroyers-for-bases transfer to Great Britain were recommissioned from the United States Navy to the Royal Navy at Halifax, Nova Scotia. The USS Aaron Ward (DD 132) became the HMS Castleton. The USS Buchanan (DD 131) became the HMS Campbeltown. The USS Crowninshield (DD 134) became the HMS Chelsea. The USS Hale (DD 133) became the HMS Caldwell. The USS Abel P. Upshur (DD 193) became the HMS Clare. The USS Welborn C. Wood (DD 195) became the HMS Chesterfield. The USS Herndon (DD 198) became the HMS Churchill. The USS Wells (DD 257) became the HMS Cameron.  
   
  Tuesday, September 10, 1940  
  The light cruiser USS St. Louis (CL 49) arrived at Norfolk, Virginia with the Greenslade Board aboard.  
   
  Thursday, September 12, 1940  
  The light cruiser USS St. Louis (CL 49) departs Norfolk, Virginia bound for her ultimate destination on this leg of the voyage, St. John's, Newfoundland. Embarked was the Greenslade Board.  
   
  Monday, September 16, 1940  
  The light cruiser USS St. Louis (CL 49), arrived at St. John's, Newfoundland with the Greenslade Board aboard.  
   
  Wednesday, September 18, 1940  
  The second group of U.S. ships involved in the in the destroyers-for-bases transfer to Great Britain arrived at Halifax, Nova Scotia. This group included the USS Kalk (DD 170), USS Maddox (DD 168), USS Cowell (DD 167), USS Foote (DD 169), USS Hopewell (DD 181), USS Abbot (DD 184), USS Thomas (DD 182) and the USS Doran (DD-185).  
   
  The light cruiser USS St. Louis (CL 49) shifted from St. John's, Newfoundland, to Argentia with the Greenslade Board aboard.  
   
  Friday, September 20, 1940  
  The third group of U.S. ships involved in the destroyers-for-bases transfer to Great Britain arrived at Halifax, Nova Scotia. This group included the USS Mackenzie (DD 175), USS Haraden (DD 183), USS Williams (DD 108), USS Thatcher (DD 162), USS McCook (DD 252) and the USS Bancroft (DD 256).  
   
  Saturday, September 21, 1940  
  The light cruiser USS St. Louis (CL 49) departed Argentia for Boston, Massachusetts with the Greenslade Board aboard.  
   
  Monday, September 23, 1940  
  The second group of U.S. ships involved in the destroyers-for-bases transfer to Great Britain were recommissioned from the United States Navy to the Royal Navy at Halifax, Nova Scotia. The USS Kalk (DD 170) became the HMS Hamilton (), the USS Maddox (DD 168) became the HMS Georgetown (I 40),the USS Cowell (DD 167) became the HMS Brighton (I 08),the USS Foote (DD 169) became the HMS Roxborough (I 07),the USS Hopewell (DD 181) became the HMS Bath (I 17),the USS Abbot (DD 184) became the HMS Charlestown (I 21),the USS Thomas (DD-182) became the HMS St. Albans (I 15), and the USS Doran (DD 185) became the HMS St. Marys (I 12).  
   
  The light cruiser USS St. Louis (CL 49) arrived at Boston, Massachusetts but set sail for Norfolk, Virginia the same day.  
   
  Tuesday, September 24, 1940  
  The third group of U.S. ships involved in the destroyers-for-bases transfer to Great Britain were recommissioned from the United States Navy to the Royal Navy at Halifax, Nova Scotia. The USS Mackenzie (DD-175) became the HMCS Annapolis (I 04), the USS Haraden (DD 183) became the HMCS Columbia (I 49), the USS Williams (DD 108) became the HMCS St. Clair (I 65), the USS Thatcher (DD 162) became the HMCS Niagara (I 57), the USS McCook (DD 252) became the HMCS St. Croix (I 81) and the USS Bancroft (DD 256) became the HMCS St. Francis (I 93).  
   
  Wednesday, September 25, 1940  
  The light cruiser USS St. Louis (CL 49) arrived at Norfolk, Virginia with the Greenslade Board aboard.  
   
  eSunday, September 29, 1940  
  The light cruiser USS St. Louis (CL 49) departed Norfolk, Virginia for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba with the Greenslade Board aboard.  
     
   
     
   
 

The objective of WW2Timelines.com is to provide a day by day account of the events that lead up to and were part of the greatest conflict known to mankind. There are accounts for the activities of each particular day and timelines for subjects and personalities. It is the of this website intent to provide an unbiased account of the war. Analysis, effects caused by an event, or prior or subsequent pertinent events are presented separately and indicated as text that is italicized.

 
   
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