October 1940 Events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
 
  Overview  
  1 Allied war vessel was damaged by a U-boat.  
     
  1 U-boat was sunk by Allied warships.  
     
  60 Allied and neutral merchant ships were sunk by U-boats totaling 342,204 tons.  
  4 Allied merchant ships were damaged by U-boats totaling 23,813 tons.  
     
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Monday, October 14, 1940  
  The armed merchant cruiser HMS Cheshire (F 18) was torpedoed and damaged by the U-137, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Wohlfarth, northwest of Ireland.  
   
  Thursday, October 24, 1940  
  The German freighter Helgoland set sail from Puerto Colombia, Colombia; despite the efforts of the destroyers USS Bainbridge (DD 246), USS Overton (DD 239), and USS Sturtevant (DD 240). The destroyers pursued the Helgoland over the ensuing days but she made good her attempt to escape the confines of the Caribbean.  
   
  Thursday, October 31, 1940  
  The German freighter Rio Grande set sail from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The Rio Grande would elude the Neutrality Patrol and ultimately reaches Bordeaux, France, six weeks later.  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  Wednesday, October 30, 1940  
  The U-32, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans Jenisch, was sunk northwest of Ireland, by depth charges from the destroyers HMS Harvester (H 19) and HMS Highlander (H 44). Of the ship’s complement, 9 died and 33 survived. During its career under two commanders the U-32 sank 20 merchant ships for a total of 116,836 tons, damaged merchant 4 ships for a total of 32,274 tons, and damaged 1 Allied warship.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Tuesday, October 1, 1940  
  The Dutch steam merchant Haulerwijk was sunk by the U-32, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans Jenisch, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 27 survived. The 3,278 ton Haulerwijk was carrying ballast and was bound for Tampa, Florida.  
   
  The unescorted British motor passenger ship Highland Patriot was torpedoed and sunk by the U-38, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Liebe, approximately 500 miles west of Bishop Rock in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 3 died and 169 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Wellington (L 65). The 14,172 ton Highland Patriot was carrying passengers, general and refrigerated cargo and was bound for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  Wednesday, October 2, 1940  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Kayeson was torpedoed and sunk by the U-32, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans Jenisch, west of Ireland in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 38 died. The 4,606 ton Kayeson was carrying general cargo and coal and was bound for Montevideo, Uruguay.  
   
  Sunday, October 6, 1940  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-222, the Norwegian motor tanker Nina Borthen was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Viktor Schütze, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 35 died. The 6,123 ton Nina Borthen was carrying ballast and was bound for Abadan, Iran.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OA-222, the British steam tanker British General was torpedoed and sunk by the U-37, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Victor Oehrn, about 550 miles west of Valentia Island in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 47 died. The 6,989 ton British General was carrying ballast and was bound for Abadan, Iran.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy OB-221, the British steam merchant Benlawers was torpedoed and sunk by the U-123, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Karl-Heinz Moehle, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 24 died and 27 survivors were picked up by the British merchant Forest and the Bengore Head. The 5,943 ton Benlawers was carrying army stores, including lorries and was bound for Port Said, Egypt.  
   
  Monday, October 7, 1940  
  A straggler from Convoy OB-225, the Norwegian motor merchant Touraine was torpedoed and sunk by the U-59, commanded by Joachim Matz, west of Bloody Foreland, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 34 survived. The 5,811 ton Touraine was carrying ballast and was bound for Sydney, Nova Scotia.  
   
  Tuesday, October 8, 1940  
  A straggler from Convoy HX-76, the British steam merchant Confield was torpedoed and sunk by the U-58, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Heinrich Schonder, approximately 90 miles west of Barra Head, Scotland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 36 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Weston and the corvette HMS Periwinkle (K 55). The 4,956 ton Confield was carrying timber, grain, and lead and was bound for Portishead, England.  
   
  Wednesday, October 9, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy SC-6, the Greek steam merchant Delphin was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Viktor Schütze, north-northwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The 3,816 ton Delphin was carrying maize and wheat and was bound for Cork, Ireland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-6, the Greek steam merchant Zannes Gounaris was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103 north-northwest of Rockall. The 4,407 ton Zannes Gounaris was carrying phosphate rock and was bound for Garston, England.  
   
  Thursday, October 10, 1940  
  A straggler from Convoy SC-6, the abandoned British steam merchant Graigwen was torpedoed and sunk by the U-123, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Karl-Heinz Moehle, north-northwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The Graigwen  had been damaged the previous day by the U-103. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 27 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Enchantress (L 56). The 3,697 ton Graigwen was carrying maize and was bound for Barry Roads, England.  
   
  Friday, October 11, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy HX-77, the Norwegian motor merchant Brandanger was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bleichrodt, west-southwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 24 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Clarkia (K 88) and the British steam merchant Clan Macdonald. The 4,624 ton Brandanger was carrying general cargo, including lumber and metals and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-77, the British motor merchant Port Gisborne was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48 west-southwest of Rockall. Of the ship’s complement, 26 died and 38 survivors were picked up by the rscue tug HMS Salvonia (W 43) and the British steam merchant Alpera. The 8,390 ton Port Gisborne was carrying refrigerated and general cargo, including bales of wool and bales of sheepskin and was bound for Cardiff, Wales.  
   
  Saturday, October 12, 1940  
  A straggler from Convoy HX-77, the Canadian steam merchant Saint-Malô was torpedoed and sunk by the U-101, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Fritz Frauenheim, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 28 died and 16 survived. The 5,779 ton Saint-Malô was carrying general cargo, including steel and grain and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-77, the Norwegian steam tanker Davanger was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bleichrodt, approximately 300 miles west of Broadhaven, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 17 died and 12 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 7,102 ton Davanger was carrying fuel oil and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-77, the British motor merchant Pacific Ranger was torpedoed and sunk by the U-59, commanded by Joachim Matz, approximately 135 miles from Bloody Foreland, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 55 survived. The 6,865 ton Pacific Ranger was carrying general cargo, including lumber and metals and was bound for Manchester, England.  
   
  Sunday, October 13, 1940  
  The unescorted Estonian steam merchant Nora was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Viktor Schütze, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 19 died and the survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Leith (L 36). The 1,186 ton Nora was carrying timber and was bound for Belfast, Ireland.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-77, the British steam merchant Stangrant was torpedoed and sunk by the U-37, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Victor Oehrn, northeast of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 30 survivors were picked up by a Sunderland flying boat (10 Squadron RAAF). The 5,804 ton Stangrant was carrying steel and scrap and was bound for Belfast, Ireland.  
   
  Tuesday, October 15, 1940  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-227, the British steam merchant Thistlegarth was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Viktor Schütze, 45 miles west-northwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 30 died and 9 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Heartsease (K 15). The 4,747 ton Thistlegarth was carrying ballast and was bound for Father Point, New Brunswick.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-228, the British steam merchant Bonheur was torpedoed and sunk by the U-138, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Wolfgang Lüth, approximately 40 miles northwest of Butt of Lewis, Scotland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 39 survived and were picked up by the minesweeping trawler HMS Sphene (FY 249). The 5,327 ton Bonheur was carrying general cargo and was bound for Rosario, Argentina.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-228, the British motor tanker British Glory was torpedoed and damaged by the U-138 approximately 40 miles northwest of Butt of Lewis. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 44 survived. The 6,993 ton British Glory was carrying ballast and was bound for Abadan, Scotland. For more information on these vessels visit the British Glory and the U-138 pages on www.uboat.net.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OA-228, the British steam merchant Hurunui was torpedoed and sunk by the U-93, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Claus Korth, approximately 120 miles west of Butt of Lewis, Scotland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 73 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant St. Margaret. The 9,331 ton Hurunui was carrying ballast and was bound for Auckland, New Zealand.  
   
  Wednesday, October 16, 1940  
  A straggler from Convoy SC-7, the Canadian steam merchant Trevisa was torpedoed and sunk by the U-124, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg-Wilhelm Schulz, approximately 220 miles west of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 14 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Bluebell (K 80). The 1,813 ton Trevisa was carrying lumber and was bound for Aberdeen, Scotland.  
   
  Thursday, October 17, 1940  
  A straggler from Convoy SC-7, the Greek steam merchant Aenos was sunk by gunfire by the U-38, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Liebe, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 25 survivors were picked up by the Canadian steam merchant Eaglescliffe Hall. The 3,554 ton Aenos was carrying wheat and was bound for Manchester, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-7, the British motor tanker Languedoc was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bleichrodt, approximately 160 miles northwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 39 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMS Bluebell (K 80). The 9,512 ton Languedoc was carrying fuel oil and was bound for Clyde, United Kingdom.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-7, the British steam merchant Scoresby was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48 approximately 160 miles northwest of Rockall. Of the ship’s complement, all 39 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMS Bluebell (K 80). The 3,843 ton Scoresby was carrying pit props and was bound for Clyde, United Kingdom.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-228, the Norwegian steam merchant Dokka was torpedoed and sunk by the U-93, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Claus Korth, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 10 died and 7 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Folkestone (L 22). The 1,168 ton Dokka was carrying ballast and was bound for Mont-Louis, Gaspe, Quebec.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-228, the British steam merchant Uskbridge was torpedoed and sunk by the U-93 in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 27 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Montreal City and the Dutch steam merchant Katwijk. The 2,715 ton Uskbridge was carrying anthracite and was bound for Montreal, Quebec.  
   
  Friday, October 18, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy SC-7, the British steam merchant Creekirk was torpedoed and sunk by the U-101, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Fritz Frauenheim, east-northeast of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 36 died. The 3,917 ton Creekirk was carrying iron ore and was bound for Workington, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-7, the British steam merchant Beatus was torpedoed and sunk by the U-46, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Engelbert Endrass, approximately 100 miles west by south of Barra Head, Scotland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 37 died. The 4,885 ton Beatus was carrying steel, lumber, and a deck cargo of crated aircraft and was bound for Middlesbrough, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-7, the Swedish steam merchant Convallaria was torpedoed and sunk by the U-46, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Engelbert Endrass, approximately 100 miles west by south of Barra Head, Scotland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Fowey (L 15). The 1,996 ton Convallaria was carrying pulpwood and was bound for Ridham Dock, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-7, the Swedish steam merchant Gunborg was torpedoed and sunk by the U-46 approximately 100 miles west by south of Barra Head. All of the ship’s complement of 23 died. The 1,572 ton Gunborg was carrying pulpwood and was bound for Ridham Dock, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy OB-228, the British steam merchant Sandsend was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bleichrodt, approximately 250 miles west-northwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 34 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Hibiscus (K 24). The 3,612 ton Sandsend was carrying anthracite and was bound for Quebec.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-7, the British steam merchant Empire Miniver was torpedoed and sunk by the U-99, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto Kretschmer, approximately 100 miles west by south of Barra Head, Scotland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 35 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Bluebell (K 80). The 6,055 ton Empire Miniver was carrying pig iron and steel and was bound for Newport, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-7, the British steam merchant Fiscus was torpedoed and sunk by the U-99 approximately 100 miles west by south of Barra Head. Of the ship’s complement, 38 died and 1 survivor was picked up by the corvette HMS Clematis. The 4,815 ton Fiscus was carrying steel, lumber, and a deck cargo of crated aircraft and was bound for Clyde, United Kingdom.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-7, the Greek steam merchant Niritos was torpedoed and sunk by the U-99 approximately 100 miles west by south of Barra Head. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 27 survived. The 3,854 ton Niritos was carrying sulfur and was bound for Garston, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SC-7, the British steam merchant Blairspey was torpedoed and damaged by the U-101, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Fritz Frauenheim, ast-northeast of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The 4,155 ton Blairspey was carrying timber and was bound for Grangemouth, Scotland. he Blairspey would be torpedoed again the next day by the U-100 but still remained afloat because her load of timber.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-7, the British steam merchant Carsbreck was torpedoed and damaged by the U-38, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Liebe, approximately 100 miles west by south of Barra Head, Scotland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The 3,670 ton Carsbreck was carrying lumber and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Saturday, October 19, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy SC-7, the British steam merchant Assyrian was torpedoed and sunk by the U-101, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Fritz Frauenheim, approximately 100 miles west by north of Barra Head, Scotland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 17 died and 34 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Leith (L 36). The 2,962 ton Assyrian was carrying grain and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-7, the Dutch steam merchant Soesterberg was torpedoed and sunk by the U-101 approximately 100 miles west by north of Barra Head. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 19 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Leith (L 36). The 1,904 ton Soesterberg was carrying pit props and was bound for Hull, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SC-7, the Dutch steam merchant Boekelo was torpedoed and sunk by the U-123, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Karl-Heinz Moehle, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 25 survived. The 2,118 ton Boekelo was carrying timber and was bound for London, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SC-7, the British steam merchant Clintonia was torpedoed and sunk by the U-123, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Karl-Heinz Moehle, approximately 200 miles west of St. Kilda, Scotland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 35 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Bluebell (K 80). The 3,106 ton Clintonia was carrying pulpwood and was bound for Manchester, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-7, the British steam merchant Sedgepool was torpedoed and sunk by the U-123 approximately 80 miles southwest of St. Kilda, Scotland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 36 survivors were picked up by the rescue tug HMS Salvonia (W 43). The 5,556 ton Sedgepool was carrying wheat and was bound for Manchester, England.  
   
  A romper from Convoy SC-7, the British steam merchant Shekatika was torpedoed and sunk by the U-123 approximately 90 miles east-southeast of Rockall. Of the ship’s complement, all 36 survived and were picked up by the sloop HMS Fowey (L 15). The 5,458 ton Shekatika was carrying pit props and steel and was bound for Hartlepool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-79, the British steam merchant Bilderdijk was torpedoed and sunk by the U-38, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Liebe, approximately 120 miles west-southwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 39 survived and were picked up by the minesweeper HMS Jason (J 99). The 6,856 ton Bilderdijk was carrying grain and general cargo and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-79, the British steam merchant Matheran was torpedoed and sunk by the U-38 approximately 120 miles west-southwest of Rockall. Of the ship’s complement, 9 died and 72 survivors were picked up by the minesweeper HMS Jason (J 99). The 7,653 ton Matheran was carrying iron, zinc, grain, machinery, and general cargo and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-79, the British steam merchant Ruperra was torpedoed and sunk by the U-46, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Engelbert Endrass, about 90 miles southwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 31 died and 7 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Induna. The 4,548 ton Ruperra was carrying steel billets, scrap iron and aircraft and was bound for Leith, Scotland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-79, the British steam merchant Uganda was torpedoed and sunk by the U-47, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Prien, about 90 miles southwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 40 survived and were picked up by the destroyer HMS Jason (J 99). The 4,966 ton Uganda was carrying lumber and steel and was bound for Milford Haven, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-79, the British motor merchant Wandby was torpedoed and sunk by the U-47 southwest of Rockall. Of the ship’s complement, all 34 survived and were picked up by the minesweeping trawler HMS Angle (FY 201). The 4,947 ton Wandby was carrying lumber, lead, and zinc and was bound for Middlesbrough, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-7, the British steam merchant Empire Brigade was torpedoed and sunk by the U-99, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto Kretschmer, approximately 100 miles east-southeast of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 35 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Fowey (L 15). The 5,154 ton Empire Brigade was carrying general cargo, including copper, ferro alloys, and steel and was bound for Leith, Scotland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-7, the Norwegian steam merchant Snefjeld was torpedoed and sunk by the U-99 southeast of Rockall. Of the ship’s complement, all 21 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMS Clematis (K 36). The 1,643 ton Snefjeld was carrying timber and was bound for London, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-7, the Greek steam merchant Thalia was torpedoed and sunk by the U-99 southeast of Rockall. Of the ship’s complement, 22 died and 4 survived. The 5,875 ton Thalia was carrying steel, lead, and zinc and was bound for Garston, England.  
   
  Sunday, October 20, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy HX-79, the British motor tanker Caprella was torpedoed and sunk by the U-100, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Joachim Schepke, approximately 150 miles southwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 52 survivors were picked up by the minesweeping trawler HMS Lady Elsa (FY 124). The 8,230 ton Caprella was carrying fuel oil and was bound for Mersey, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-79, the British steam merchant Loch Lomond was torpedoed and sunk by the U-100 southwest of Rockall. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 1 died and 111 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Jason (J 99). The 5,452 ton Loch Lomond was carrying passengers, lumber, and steel and was bound for Immingham, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-79, the British motor tanker Sitala was torpedoed and sunk by the U-100 approximately 150 miles southwest of Rockall. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 43 survivors were picked up by the minesweeping trawler HMS Lady Elsa (FY 124). The 6,218 ton Sitala was carrying crude oil and was bound for Manchester, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-229, the Norwegian steam merchant Cubano was torpedoed and sunk by the U-124, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg-Wilhelm Schulz, southwest of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 29 survivors were picked up by the Canadian destroyer HMCS Saguenay (D 79). The 5,810 ton Cubano was carrying ballast and was bound for Montreal, Quebec.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-229, the British steam merchant Sulaco was torpedoed and sunk by the U-124 approximately 360 miles west of Rockall. Of the ship’s complement, 65 died and 1 survivor was picked up by the Canadian destroyer HMCS Saguenay (D 79). The 5,389 ton Sulaco was carrying ballast.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-79, the Swedish motor tanker Janus was torpedoed and sunk by the U-46, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Engelbert Endrass, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 33 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Hibiscus (K 24). The 9,965 ton Janus was carrying fuel oil and was bound for Clyde, United Kingdom.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-79, the British motor merchant La Estancia was torpedoed and sunk by the U-47, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Prien, southwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 33 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Coreopsis (K 32). The 5,185 ton La Estancia was carrying sugar and was bound for Middlesbrough, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-79, the British steam merchant Whitford Point was torpedoed and sunk by the U-47 90 miles southwest of Rockall. Of the ship’s complement, 37 died and 3 survivors were picked up by the British trawler Sturdee. The 5,026 ton Whitford Point was carrying steel and was bound for London, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-79, the British motor tanker Athelmonarch was torpedoed and damaged by the U-47 southwest of Rockall Of the ship’s complement, all 41 survived. The 8,995 ton Athelmonarch was carrying molasses and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-79, the British steam tanker Shirak was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bleichrodt, approximately 90 miles southwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 37 survived and were picked up by the minesweeping trawler HMS Blackfly (FY 1173). The 6,023 ton Shirak was carrying refined petroleum products and was bound for London, England.  
   
  Thursday, October 29, 1940  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Matina was torpedoed and sunk by the U-31, commanded by Wilfried Prellberg, west of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 69 died. The 5,389 ton Matina was carrying bananas and was bound for Garston, England.  
   
  Saturday, October 31, 1940  
  A straggler from Convoy HX-82, the British steam merchant Rutland was torpedoed and sunk by the U-124, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg-Wilhelm Schulz, southwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 24 died. The 1,437 ton Rutland was carrying bananas and was bound for Garston, England.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  Wednesday, October 2, 1940  
  The light cruiser USS St. Louis (CL 49) arrives at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba with the Greenslade Board aboard. The Greenslade Board was a committee formed "to make a comprehensive study of the shore establishment (naval and commercial) necessary to support the Fleet in peace and war." With the strategic requirements of the fleet in mind, the board was instructed to make recommendations for additional facilities in new locations and as to the expansion, limitation, contraction, abandonment, or conversion of existing shore facilities. The board was known by its senior member, Rear Admiral John W. Greenslade./the board, headed by Rear Admiral John F. Greenslade, which would evaluate base sites acquired from the British on September 5 in the destroyers-for-bases agreement.  
   
  Saturday, October 5, 1940  
  The fourth group of U.S. ships involved in the in the destroyers-for-bases transfer to Great Britain arrived at Halifax, Nova Scotia. This group included the USS Branch (DD 197), USS Hunt (DD 194), USS Mason (DD 191), USS Satterlee (DD 190), USS Laub (DD 263), USS Aulick (DD 258), USS Edwards (DD 265) and USS McLanahan (DD 264).  
   
  Sunday, October 6, 1940  
  The fourth group of ships involved in the destroyers-for-bases agreement are turned over to Royal Navy crews at Halifax. The USS Branch (DD 197) became the HMS Beverley (H 64), the USS Hunt (DD 194) became the HMS Broadway (H 90), the USS Mason (DD 191) became the HMS Broadwater (H 81), the USS Satterlee (DD 190) became the HMS Belmont (H 46), the USS Laub (DD 263) became the HMS Burwell (H 94), the USS Aulick (DD 258) became the HMS Burnham (H 82), the USS Edwards (DD 265) became the HMS Buxton (H 96), and the USS McLanahan (DD 264) became the HMS Bradford (H 72).  
   
  Wednesday, October 16, 1940  
  The fifth group of ships involved in the destroyers-for- bases agreement transfer to Great Britain arrived at Halifax, Nova Scotia. This group included the USS Twiggs (DD 127), USS Philip (DD 76), USS Evans (DD 78), USS Wickes (DD 75), USS McCalla (DD 253), USS Rodgers (DD 170), USS Conner (DD 72), USS Conway (DD 70), USS Stockton (DD 73) and USS Yarnall (DD 143).  
   
  Saturday, October 19, 1940  
  The light cruiser USS St. Louis (CL 49) departed Guantanamo Bay, Cuba for San Juan, Puerto Rico with the Greenslade Board aboard.  
   
  Sunday, October 20, 1940  
  The light cruiser USS St. Louis (CL 49) arrived at San Juan, Puerto Rico with the Greenslade Board aboard.  
   
  Monday, October 21, 1940  
  The light cruiser USS St. Louis (CL 49) departed San Juan, Puerto Rico for a return visit to Hamilton, Bermuda with the Greenslade Board aboard.  
   
  Wednesday, October 23, 1940  
  The fourth group of ships involved in the destroyers-for-bases transfer to Great Britain were recommissioned from the United States Navy to the Royal Navy at Halifax, Nova Scotia. The USS Twiggs (DD 127) became the HMS Leamington (G 19), the USS Philip (DD 76) became the HMS Lancaster (G 05), the USS Evans (DD 78) became the HMS Mansfield (G 76), the USS Wickes (DD 75) became the HMS Montgomery (G 95), the USS McCalla (DD 253) became the HMS Stanley (I 73), the USS Rodgers (DD 170) became the HMS Sherwood I 80 (), the USS Conner (DD 72) became the HMS Leeds (G 27), the USS Conway (DD 70) became the HMS Lewes (G 68), the USS Stockton (DD 73) became the HMS Ludlow (G 57), and the USS Yarnall (DD 143) became the HMS Lincoln (G 42).  
   
  Thursday, October 24, 1940  
  The light cruiser USS St. Louis (CL 49) arrived at Hamilton, Bermuda with the Greenslade Board aboard.  
   
  Friday, October 25, 1940  
  The light cruiser USS St. Louis (CL 49) departed Hamilton, Bermuda for Norfolk, Virginia with the Greenslade Board aboard.  
   
  Sunday, October 27, 1940  
  The light cruiser USS St. Louis (CL 49) arrived at Norfolk, Virginia thus winding up her mission transporting the Greenslade Board.  
   
  Wednesday, October 30, 1940  
  Because of delay in the arrival of crews assigned to the last of the destroyers to be transferred to the Royal Navy, the Commander Destroyers Atlantic Squadron, Captain Ferdinand L. Reichmuth, departed Halifax, Nova Scotia in the destroyer tender USS Denebola (AD 12) accompanied by the destroyer USS Russell (DD 414).  
     
   
     
   
 

The objective of WW2Timelines.com is to provide a day by day account of the events that lead up to and were part of the greatest conflict known to mankind. There are accounts for the activities of each particular day and timelines for subjects and personalities. It is the of this website intent to provide an unbiased account of the war. Analysis, effects caused by an event, or prior or subsequent pertinent events are presented separately and indicated as text that is italicized.

 
   
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