November 1940 Events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
  Overview  
  1 auxiliary Allied war vessel was sunk by a U-boat.  
   
  2 U-boats were sunk by Allied aircraft and mines.  
   
  32 Allied and neutral merchant ships were sunk by U-boats totaling 153,063 tons.  
  3 Allied and neutral merchant ships were damaged by U-boats totaling 13,409 tons.  
   
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Sunday, November 3, 1940  
  The 18,724 ton armed merchant cruiser HMS Laurentic (F 51) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-99, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto Kretschmer, approximately 240 miles west-southwest of Bloody Foreland, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean after responding to the distress signals of the British steam merchant Casanare. Of the ship’s complement, 49 died and 368 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Hesperus (H 57).  
   
  The German freighter Helgoland, which had departed Colombian waters on October 24, skirted the Antilles near St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, in her bid for freedom.  
   
  Friday, November 15, 1940  
  The destroyer USS Plunkett (DD 431), on Neutrality Patrol off Tampico, Mexico, observed the German freighter Orinoco and tanker Phrygia making preparations for sea.  
   
  Friday, November 29, 1940  
  The destroyers USS Simpson (DD 221) and USS Broome (DD 210), on Neutrality Patrol off Tampico, Mexico, trailed the German freighters Idarwald and Rhein as the two German ships made a bid for freedom.  
   
  Saturday, November 30, 1940  
  The German freighter Helgoland, which had eluded the Neutrality Patrol, reached St. Nazaire, France.  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  Monday, November 11, 1940  
  The U-31, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Wilfried Prellberg, was sunk in Jadebusen, Germany by bombs from British Bristol Blenheim aircraft during a raid by RAF Bomber Command. All of the ship’s complement of 58 died. During its career under two commanders the U-31 sank 11 merchant ships sunk for a total of 27,751 tons, 2 auxiliary warships and damaged 1 warship.  
   
  Thursday, November 28, 1940  
  The U-104, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Harald Jürst, went missing probably lost to a mine northwest of Tory Island, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. During its career under Kapitänleutnant Jürst the U-104 sank 1 merchant ship for a total of 8,240 tons and damaged 1 merchant ship damaged for a total of 10,516 tons.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Friday, November 1, 1940  
  A straggler from Convoy HX-82, the British steam merchant Empire Bison was torpedoed and sunk by the U-124, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg-Wilhelm Schulz, approximately 400 miles west of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 31 died and 4 survivors were picked up by the Danish merchant Olga S. The 5,612 ton Empire Bison was carrying scrap steel and 94 trucks and was bound for Clyde, the United Kingdom.  
   
  Sunday, November 3, 1940  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Casanare was torpedoed and sunk by the U-99, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto Kretschmer, approximately 240 miles west-southwest of Bloody Foreland, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 9 died and 54 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Beagle (H 30). The 5,376 ton Casanare was carrying bananas and was bound for Garston, England.  
   
  Monday, November 4, 1940  
  The 11,314 ton armed merchant cruiser HMS Patroclus was torpedoed and sunk by the U-99, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto Kretschmer, approximately 240 miles west-southwest of Bloody Foreland, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean after responding to the distress signals of the British steam merchant Casanare. Of the ship’s complement, 56 died and 263 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Beagle (H 30).  
   
  Tuesday, November 5, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy HX-83, the British motor tanker Scottish Maiden was torpedoed and sunk by the U-99, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto Kretschmer, approximately 225 miles west by south of Bloody Foreland, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 16 died and 28 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Beagle (H 30). The 6,993 ton Scottish Maiden was carrying diesel and marine fuel oil and was bound for Avonmouth, England.  
   
  Friday, November 8, 1940  
  The Portuguese steam merchant Gonçalo Velho was stopped by gunfire and damaged by the U-47, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Prien, west of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The Gonçalo Velho was allowed to proceed because no contraband could be found.  
   
  Wednesday, November 13, 1940  
  A straggler from Convoy OB-240, the British steam merchant Cape St. Andrew was torpedoed and sunk by the U-137, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Wohlfarth, west-northwest of Aran Islands, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 15 died and 53 survivors were picked up by the British rescue tug HMS Salvonia. The 5,094 ton Cape St. Andrew was carrying ballast and was bound for Bombay, India.  
   
  Friday, November 15, 1940  
  The Norwegian motor tanker Havbør was torpedoed and sunk by the U-65, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans-Gerrit von Stockhausen, approximately 250 miles north of the Equator off the coast of Africa in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 60 died and 4 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Baron Ardrossan. The 7,614 ton Havbør was carrying crude oil and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-235, the British steam merchant Kohinur was torpedoed and sunk by the U-65 approximately 250 miles north of the Equator off the coast of Africa. Of the ship’s complement, 17 died and 68 survived. The 5,168 ton Kohinur was carrying government stores and was bound for Port Said, Egypt.  
   
  Saturday, November 16, 1940  
  A romper from Convoy SLS-53, the British steam merchant Planter was torpedoed and sunk by the U-137, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Wohlfarth, approximately 30 miles north-northwest of Bloody Foreland, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 13 died and 60 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Clare (I 14). The 5,887 ton Planter was carrying Egyptian produce and was bound for Manchester, England.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-234, the British steam merchant Fabian was torpedoed and then sunk by gunfire by the U-65, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans-Gerrit von Stockhausen, approximately 350 miles south-southwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 33 survivors were picked up by the British steam tanker British Statesman. The 3,059 ton Fabian was carrying general cargo and was bound for Istanbul, Turkey.  
   
  Sunday, November 17, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy HG-46, the British motor merchant Saint Germain was torpedoed and sunk by the U-137, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Wohlfarth, north-northwest of Tory Island, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 18 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMS Mallow (K 81). The 1,044 ton Saint Germain was carrying pit props and was bound for Port Talbot, Wales.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HG-46, the Swedish steam merchant Veronica was torpedoed and sunk by the U-137 north-northwest of Tory Island, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 17 died and 3 survivors were picked up by a fishing trawler. The 1,316 ton Veronica was carrying iron ore and was bound for Barrow-in-Furness, England.  
   
  Monday, November 18, 1940  
  The unescorted British motor tanker Congonian was torpedoed and sunk by the U-65, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans-Gerrit von Stockhausen, west-southwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 35 survivors were picked up by the heavy cruiser HMS Devonshire (39). The 5,065 ton Congonian was carrying ballast and was bound for Freetown.  
   
  Thursday, November 21, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy OB-244, the British steam merchant Daydawn was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Viktor Schütze, approximately 250 miles west of Bloody Foreland, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 36 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Rhododendron (K 78). The 4,768 ton Daydawn was carrying coal and was bound for Rio Santiago, Argentina.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-244, the Greek steam merchant Victoria was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103 approximately 250 miles west of Bloody Foreland. Of the ship’s complement, all 27 survived and were picked up by the destroyer HMS Castleton (I 23). The 6,085 ton Victoria was carrying ballast and was bound for Botwood, Newfoundland.  
   
  Friday, November 22, 1940  
  A straggler from Convoy SL-53, the British steam merchant Cree was torpedoed and sunk by the U-123, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Karl-Heinz Moehle, approximately 365 miles west of Bloody Foreland, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 45 died. The 4,791 ton Cree was carrying iron ore and was bound for Workington, England.  
   
  Saturday, November 23, 1940  
  Sailing with Convoy SC-11, the British steam merchant Bradfyne was torpedoed and sunk by the U-100, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Joachim Schepke, southeast of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 39 died and 4 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian Steam merchant Norse King. The 4,740 ton Bradfyne was carrying grain and was bound for Belfast, Ireland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-11, the Dutch steam merchant Bussum was torpedoed and sunk by the U-100 approximately 90 miles west of Tory Island, Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, all 29 survived and were picked up by the Canadian destroyer HMCS Ottawa (H 60). The 3,636 ton Bussum was carrying grain and was bound for Belfast, Ireland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-11, the British steam merchant Justitia was torpedoed and sunk by the U-100 approximately 160 miles west of Bloody Foreland. Of the ship’s complement, 13 died and 26 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Enchantress (L 56). The 4,562 ton Justitia was carrying timber, steel, general cargo, and turpentine and was bound for London, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-11, the British motor merchant Leise Mærsk was torpedoed and sunk by the U-100 approximately 160 miles west of Bloody Foreland. Of the ship’s complement, 17 died and 7 survivors were picked up by a Dutch salvage tug. The 3,136 ton Leise Mærsk was carrying grain and general cargo and was bound for Sharpness, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-11, the Dutch steam merchant Ootmarsum was torpedoed and sunk by the U-100 in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 25 died. The 3,628 ton Ootmarsum was carrying iron ore and was bound for Newport, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-11, the Norwegian steam merchant Salonica was torpedoed and sunk by the U-100 in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 9 died and 16 survivors were picked up by the Canadian destroyer HMCS Skeena (D 59) and the sloop HMS Enchantress (L 56). The 2,694 ton Salonica was carrying pit props and was bound for Newcastle, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-11, the Norwegian steam merchant Bruse was torpedoed and damaged beyond repair by the U-100 in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 16 died and 5 survivors were picked up by the Canadian destroyer HMCS Skeena (D 59). The 2,205 ton Bruse was carrying lumber and was bound for Ipswich, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-244, the British steam merchant King Idwal was torpedoed and sunk by the U-123, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Karl-Heinz Moehle, approximately 160 miles west of Rockall, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 12 died and 28 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Sandwich (L 12). The 5,115 ton King Idwal was carrying ballast and was bound for Baltimore, Maryland.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy OB-244, the British steam merchant Oakcrest was torpedoed and sunk by the U-123 approximately 250 miles west of Rockall,. Of the ship’s complement, 35 died and 6 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 5,407 ton Oakcrest was carrying ballast and was bound for New York, United States.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-244, the British steam merchant Tymeric was torpedoed and sunk by the U-123 approximately 350 miles west-northwest of Malin Head, Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, 71 died and 5 survivors and were picked up by the sloop HMS Sandwich (L 12). The 5,228 ton Tymeric was carrying coal and was bound for Buenos Aires, Argentina.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-244, the British steam merchant Anten was torpedoed by the U-123, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Karl-Heinz Moehle, and was abandoned by the crew in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 32 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Sandwich (L 12). The 5,135 ton Anten was carrying ballast and was bound for Capetown, South Africa. The U-123 had tried to finish off the torpedoed ship, but it collided submerged with an object, probably another wreck or debris. Both periscopes and the conning tower were damaged and forced U-123 to break off the patrol. The wreck of the Anten would sink two days later.  
   
  Wednesday, November 27, 1940  
  A straggler from Convoy OB-248, the British motor merchant Glenmoor was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Viktor Schütze, approximately 165 miles northwest of Sylne Head, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 31 died and 2 survivors were picked up by the destroyers HMS Harvester (H 19) and HMS Havelock (H 88). The 4,393 ton Glenmoor was carrying coal and was bound for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-88, the British steam merchant Diplomat was torpedoed and sunk by the U-104, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Harald Jürst, 128 miles west-northwest of Bloody Foreland, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and 39 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Active (H 14). The 8,240 ton Diplomat was carrying cotton, iron and steel, and general cargo and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-87, the British motor tanker Charles F. Meyer was torpedoed and damaged probably by the U-104 northwest of Ireland.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy OB-248, the British steam merchant Irene Maria was torpedoed and sunk by the U-95, commanded by Gerd Schreiber, northwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 25 died. The 1,862 ton Irene Maria was carrying ballast and was bound for Bridgewater, Nova Scotia.  
   
  Thursday, November 28, 1940  
  The Greek steam merchant Mount Athos was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Viktor Schütze, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 19 died. The 3,578 ton Mount Athos was carrying coal and was bound for Freetown, Sierra Leone.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-249, the British steam merchant St. Elwyn was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103 approximately 500 miles east of Bishop Rock in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 24 died and 16 survivors were picked up by the British merchant Leeds City. The 4,940 ton St. Elwyn was carrying coal and was bound for Santos, Brazil.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy OB-248, the Norwegian steam merchant Ringhorn was damaged by gunfire by the U-95, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Gerd Schreiber, in the northern Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  Saturday, November 30, 1940  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Aracataca was torpedoed and sunk by the U-101, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Mengersen, west-northwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 36 died and 34 survivors were picked up by the British merchants Potaro and Djurdjura. The 5,378 ton Aracataca was carrying bananas and was bound for Avonmouth, England.  
   
  Axis Merchant Shipping Losses  
  Saturday, November 16, 1940  
  The destroyer USS McCormick (DD 223), on Neutrality Patrol off Tampico, Mexico, foiled an attempt by the German freighter Orinoco to make a break for European waters.  
   
  The destroyer USS Plunkett (DD 431), by her very presence, thwarted the German tanker Phrygia's bid for freedom. The Phrygia's crew scuttled her.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  Thursday, November 21, 1940  
  The sixth and last group of U.S. ships involved in the in the destroyers-for-bases transfer to Great Britain arrived at Halifax, Nova Scotia. This group included the USS Bailey (DD 269), USS Meade (DD 274), USS Shubrick (DD 268), USS Swasey (DD 273), USS Claxton (DD 140), USS Fairfax (DD 93), USS Robinson (DD 88), USS Ringgold (DD 89), USS Sigourney (DD 81) and USS Tillman (DD 135)--arrives at Halifax, Nova Scotia. Turnover of the last ten ships was under the charge of Commander Destroyer Squadron 33 (Captain Schuyler F. Heim).  
   
  Tuesday, November 26, 1940  
  The sixth group of ships involved in the destroyers-for-bases transfer to Great Britain were recommissioned from the United States Navy to the Royal Navy at Halifax, Nova Scotia. The USS Bailey (DD 269) becomes HMS Reading (G 71), the USS Meade (DD 274) became the HMS Ramsey (G 60), the USS Shubrick (DD 268) became the HMS Ripley (G 79), the USS Swasey (DD 273) became the HMS Rockingham (G 58), the USS Claxton (DD 140) became the HMS Salisbury (I 52), the USS Fairfax (DD 93) became the HMS Richmond (G 88), the USS Robinson (DD 88) became the HMS Newmarket (G 47), the USS Ringgold (DD 89) became the HMS Newark (G 08), the USS Sigourney (DD 81) became the HMS Newport (Newport) and the USS Tillman (DD 135) became the HMS Wells (I 95)  
     
   
     
   
 

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