February 1941 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
 
  Overview  
  3 Allied warships were sunk by the Luftwaffe or by mines.  
  1 Allied auxiliary warship was sunk by a U-boat.  
  1 Allied auxiliary warship was damaged by a U-boat.  
   
  No German U-boats were sunk during February 1941.  
   
  43 Allied or neutral merchant ships were sunk by U-boats totaling 208,581 tons.  
  1 Allied fishing vessel was sunk by the Luftwaffe.  
  2 Allied merchant ships were damaged by U-boats totaling 17,824 tons.  
   
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Sunday, February 2, 1941  
  The minesweeping trawler HMS Almond (T 14) hit a mine and sank off Falmouth, southwestern England.  
   
  Monday, February 3, 1941  
  The British ocean boarding vessel HMS Crispin was just detached from the dispersed convoy OB-280 together with HMS Arbutus (K 86), the British armed yacht HMS Philante, and the British rescue ship Copeland to join the convoy SC-20 when it was torpedoed and damaged by the U-107, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günter Hessler, north-northwest of Rockall in the North Atlantic Ocean. The HMS Crispin was abandoned and it foundered the following day. Of the ship’s complement, 20 died and 121 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Harvester (H 19). The 5,051 ton HMS Crispin was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Wednesday, February 5, 1941  
  The ASW trawler HMS Tourmaline (T 42) was sunk by German aircraft off North Foreland, Kent off the eastern coast of England.  
   
  Sunday, February 16, 1941  
  The minesweeping trawler HMS Ormonde (FY 782), commanded by Lt. Philip F. G. Hamilton, was sunk by German aircraft off the east coast of Scotland.  
   
  Sunday, February 23, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-288, the British ocean boarding vessel HMS Manistee (F 104) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günter Hessler, south of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 141 died.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Saturday, February 1, 1941  
  The Greek steam merchant Nicolas Angelos was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Schultze, in the North Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement died. The 4,351 ton Nicolas Angelos was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Monday, February 3, 1941  
  A straggler from convoy OB-279, the British steam merchant Empire Citizen was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günter Hessler, southwest of Iceland. Of the ship’s complement, 78 died and 5 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Clarkia (K 88). The 4,683 ton Empire Citizen was carrying general cargo and was bound for Rangoon, Burma.  
   
  A straggler from convoy SC-20, the British steam merchant Dione II was bombed and damaged by a German Fw200 Condor aircraft of I./KG 40 northwest of Ireland. The Dione II would be sunk the next day by the U-93.  
   
  Tuesday, February 4, 1941  
  A straggler from Convoy SC-20, the British steam merchant Empire Engineer was torpedoed and sunk by the U-123, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Karl-Heinz Moehle, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland. All of the ship’s complement of 39 died. The 5,358 ton Empire Engineer was carrying steel ingots.  
   
  A straggler from convoy OB-280 since February 2 due to bad weather, the Norwegian steam merchant Ringhorn was torpedoed and sunk by the U-52, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto Salman, in the North Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and 5 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Harvester (H 19) which already had 113 survivors from HMS Crispin on board. The 1298 ton Ringhorn was carrying coal and was bound for St. John, New Brunswick.  
   
  A straggler from convoy SC-20 and having been bombed and damaged by a German Fw200 Condor aircraft the previous day, the British steam merchant Dione II was torpedoed and sunk by the U-93, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Claus Korth, northwest of Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, 28 died and 5 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Flowergate. The 2,660 ton Dione II was carrying iron ore and was bound for Cardiff, Wales.  
   
  Thursday, February 6, 1941  
  A straggler from Convoy SC-20, the Canadian steam merchant Maplecourt was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günter Hessler, south-southwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 37 died. The 3,388 ton Maplecourt was carrying general cargo and steel and was bound for Preston, England.  
   
  Sunday, February 9, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy HG-53, the British steam merchant Courland was torpedoed and sunk by the U-37, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Asmus Nicolai Clausen, approximately 160 miles southwest of Cape St. Vincent, Portugal in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 27 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant, which was sunk by the same U-boat the next day. The 1,325 ton Courland was carrying general cargo and steel was bound for London, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HG-53, the British steam merchant Estrellano was torpedoed and sunk by the U-37 approximately 160 miles southwest of Cape St. Vincent. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 21 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Deptford (L 53). The 1,983 ton Estrellano was carrying general cargo and canned fish was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Monday, February 10, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy HG-53, the British steam merchant Brandenburg was torpedoed and sunk by the U-37, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Asmus Nicolai Clausen, approximately 160 miles southwest of Cape St. Vincent, Portugal in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 49 died and 1 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Velox (D 34). The day before, the ship had picked up 27 survivors from the British steam merchant Courland and all except one were lost in the second sinking. The 1,473 ton Brandenburg was carrying pyrites and sulfur was bound for Leith, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy OG-52, the British steam merchant Canford Chine was torpedoed and sunk by the U-52, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto Salman, south-southwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 35 died. The 3,364 ton Canford Chine was carrying coal and was bound for Uriburu, Argentina.  
   
  Thursday, February 13, 1941  
  A straggler from Convoy HX-106, the British motor tanker Arthur F. Corwin was torpedoed and sunk by the U-96, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Lehmann-Willenbrock, southeast of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The Arthur F. Corwin had been damaged by the U-103 earlier that day. All of the ship’s complement of 46 died. The 10,516 ton Arthur F. Corwin was carrying motor fuel and was bound for Avonmouth, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-106, the British motor tanker Clea was torpedoed and sunk by the U-96 southeast of Iceland. All of the ship’s complement of 59 died. The 10,516 ton Clea was carrying Admiralty fuel oil and was bound for Scapa Flow, Scotland.  
   
  Friday, February 14, 1941  
  A straggler from Convoy OB-284, the British steam merchant Holystone was torpedoed and sunk by the U-101, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Mengersen, west of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 40 died. The 5,462 ton Holystone was carrying ballast and was bound for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  
   
  Saturday, February 15, 1941  
  A straggler from Convoy SC-21, the British steam merchant Alnmoor was torpedoed and sunk by the U-123, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Karl-Heinz Moehle, south-southeast of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 55 died. The 6,573 ton Alnmoor was carrying general cargo and was bound for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  Monday, February 17, 1941  
  Detached from Convoy SL-64, the unescorted British steam merchant Gairsoppa was torpedoed and sunk by the U-101, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Mengersen, approximately 300 miles southwest of Galway Bay, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 85 died and 1 survived. The 5,237 ton Gairsoppa was carrying pig iron, tea, general cargo, and 200 tons of silver ingots and coins and was bound for London, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-107, the British motor tanker Edwy R. Brown was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Viktor Schütze, southeast of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 50 died. The 10,455 ton Edwy R. Brown was carrying petroleum products and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  The unescorted British motor merchant Siamese Prince was torpedoed and sunk by the U-69, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jost Metzler, southwest of the Faröe Islands in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 57 died. The 8,456 ton Siamese Prince was carrying general cargo and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Tuesday, February 18, 1941  
  The unescorted British motor merchant Seaforth was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Viktor Schütze, outh of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 59 died. The 5,459 ton Seaforth was carrying West African produce and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-107, the British steam merchant Black Osprey was torpedoed and sunk by the U-96, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Lehmann-Willenbrock, south of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 25 died and 11 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian merchant Mosdale. The 5,589 ton Black Osprey was carrying steel and trucks and was bound for Newport, England.  
   
  Wednesday, February 19, 1941  
  A straggler from Convoy HX-107, the Norwegian motor merchant Benjamin Franklin was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Viktor Schütze, southeast of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 36 survived and were picked up by the corbette HMS Pimpernel (K 71) and the Egyptian steam merchant Memphis. On February 28 the engines of the Memphis were disabled in heavy weather and she foundered northwest of Ireland and all on board were lost. The 7,034 ton Benjamin Franklin was carrying general cargo, including lead, explosives, and aircraft parts and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-107, the British steam merchant Empire Blanda was torpedoed and sunk by the U-69, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jost Metzler, south of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 40 died. The 5,693 ton Empire Blanda was carrying scrap iron, steel, and explosives and was bound for Grangemouth, England.  
   
  Friday, February 21, 1941  
  The 398 ton trawler Lincoln City was sunk by aircraft near the Faroe Islands in the North Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  Saturday, February 22, 1941  
  The Dutch steam merchant Texelstroom was torpedoed and sunk by the U-108, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Klaus Scholtz, south of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 25 died. The 1,617 ton Texelstroom was bound for Grimsby, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy OB-287, the British motor tanker Scottish Standard was torpedoed and sunk by the U-96, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Lehmann-Willenbrock, southeast of Iceland. The ship had been damaged by bombs the previous day from a German Fw200 Condor aircraft and was abandoned. Of the ship’s complement, 44 died and 5 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Montgomery (G 95). The 6,999 ton Scottish Standard was carrying ballast and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Sunday, February 23, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-288, the British steam merchant Marslew was torpedoed and sunk by the U-69, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jost Metzler, approximately 300 miles north-northwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 13 died and 23 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Empire Cheetah. The 4,542 ton Marslew was carrying general cargo and was bound for Villa Constitucion, Argentina.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-288, the British steam merchant Anglo-Peruvian was torpedoed and sunk by the U-96, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Lehmann-Willenbrock, southwest of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 29 died and 17 survivors were picked up by the British merchant Harberton. The 5,457 ton Anglo-Peruvian was carrying coal and was bound for Boston, Massachussetts.  
   
  Monday, February 24, 1941  
  The Dutch steam merchant Grootekerk was torpedoed and sunk by the U-123, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Karl-Heinz Moehle, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 52 died. The 8,685 ton Grootekerk was bound for the British West Indies.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SLS-64, the British steam merchant Nailsea Lass was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Schultze, 60 miles southwest of Fastnet, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 31 survivors reached land by lifeboat except the master and the chief officer who were taken prisoner. The 4,289 ton Nailsea Lass was carrying charcoal, 1 pig iron, iron ore, tea, hemp, and jute and was bound for London, England.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-288, the British steam merchant Waynegate was torpedoed and sunk by the U-73, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Rosenbaum, south of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 41 survived and were picked up by the destroyer FFL Léopard. The 4,260 ton Waynegate was carrying coal and was bound for Freetown, Sierra Leone.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-288, the British steam merchant Cape Nelson was torpedoed and sunk by the U-95, commanded by Gerd Schreiber, southwest of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 34 survivors were picked up by the British merchant Harberton. The 3,807 ton Cape Nelson was carrying ballast and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-288, the British steam merchant Temple Moat was torpedoed and sunk by the U-95, southwest of Iceland. All of the ship’s complement of 42 died. The 4,427 ton Temple Moat was carrying coal and was bound for Buenos Aires, Argentina.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-288, the Norwegian steam merchant Svein Jarl was torpedoed and sunk by the U-95, southwest of Iceland. All of the ship’s complement of 22 died. The 1,908 ton Svein Jarl was carrying ballast and was bound for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-288, the British steam merchant Linaria was torpedoed and sunk by the U-96 southwest of Reykjavik All of the ship’s complement of 34 died. The 3,385 ton Linaria was carrying coal and was bound for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-288, the British steam merchant Sirikishna was torpedoed and sunk by the U-96, south of Iceland. All of the ship’s complement of 43 died. The 5,458 ton Sirikishna was carrying ballast and was bound for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-289, the British steam tanker British Gunner was torpedoed and sunk by the U-97, commanded by Udo Heilmann, approximately 275 miles northwest of Cape Wrath, northern Scotland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 41 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Petunia (K 79). The 6,894 ton British Gunner was carrying ballast and was bound for Aruba.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-289, the British steam merchant Jonathan Holt was torpedoed and sunk by the U-97 southwest of the Faroe Islands. Of the ship’s complement, 51 died and 6 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Petunia (K 79) and the British rescue ship Copeland. The 4,973 ton Jonathan Holt was carrying general cargo and was bound for West Africa.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-289, the British steam merchant J Mansepool was torpedoed and sunk by the U-97 southwest of the Faroe Islands. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 39 survivors were picked up by the British merchant Thomas Holt and transferred the corvette HMS Petunia (K 79). The 4,894 ton Mansepool was carrying ballast and was bound for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-289, the Norwegian motor tanker G.C. Brøvig was torpedoed and damaged by the U-97 southeast of Iceland. The 9,718 ton G.C. Brøvig was carrying ballast and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Wednesday, February 26, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy OB-290, the Norwegian motor merchant Borgland was torpedoed and sunk by the U-47, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Prien, northwest of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 32 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMS Pimpernel (K 71). The 3,636 ton Borgland was carrying ballast with six aircraft as deck cargo and was bound for Takoradi, Ghana.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-290, the Belgian steam merchant Kasongo was torpedoed and sunk by the U-47 northwest of Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 40 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Campanula (K 18). The 5,254 ton Kasongo was carrying general cargo and ammunition and was bound for Matadi, Belgian Congo.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-290, the Swedish motor merchant Rydboholm was torpedoed and sunk by the U-47 northwest of Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, all 28 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMS Pimpernel (K 71). The 3,197 ton Rydboholm was carrying ballast and was bound for Freetown, Sierra Leone.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-290, the 8,106 ton British motor tanker Diala was torpedoed and damaged by the U-47 northwest of Ireland.  
   
  The Swedish steam merchant Göteborg was reported missing after leaving Reykjavik on February, 25. It is possible that she was sunk by U-70, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Joachim Matz, southeast of Iceland the next day. All of the ship’s complement of 23 died. The 820 ton Göteborg was carrying herring and was bound for Gothenburg, Sweden.  
   
  Friday, February 28, 1941  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Effna was torpedoed and sunk by the U-108, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Klaus Scholtz, southeast of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 33 died. The 6,461 ton Effna was carrying steel and trucks and was bound for Newport, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-109, the British steam merchant Holmelea was torpedoed and sunk by the U-47, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Prien, southwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 27 died and 11 survivors were picked up by the Icelandic trawler Baldur. The 4,223 ton Holmelea was carrying grain, linseed and maize and was bound for Hull, England.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  Monday, February 3, 1941  
  Admiral Günther Lütjens takes the battleships SMS Scharnhorst and SMS Gneisenau through the Denmark Strait into the Atlantic on the beginning of a commerce-raiding mission.  
   
  Wednesday, February 5, 1941  
  After solid pressure from the Germans the Royal Danish Navy handed over six of its newer torpedo boats, without armament, to the German occupation forces. As the torpedo boats left the naval dock in Copenhagen, Kong Christian X ordered the Sovereign Flag at the naval base lowered to half mast.  
   
  Sunday, February 16, 1941  
  The new Headquarters of the Royal Navy's Western Approaches command at Derby House, Liverpool opened.  
   
  Monday, February 17, 1941  
  Admiral Sir Percy L. H. Noble replaced Admiral Sir Martin Dunbar-Nasmith as commander of the Royal Navy’s Western Approaches Command. Admiral Noble’s responsibility was the safety of the merchant convoys to Great Britain and to increase U-boat kills. Admiral Dunbar-Nasmith remained at Plymouth as the Commander-in-Chief, Plymouth.  
     
   
     
   
 

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