May 1941 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
  Overview  
  2 Allied warships were sunk by German aircraft.  
  1 Allied warship was sunk by a U-boat.  
  1 Allied warship was sunk by a German motor torpedo boat.  
  2 Allied auxiliary warships were sunk by U-boats.  
   
  1 U-boat was captured by Allied warships.  
   
  61 Allied or neutral merchant ships were sunk by U-boats totaling 333,912 tons.  
  2 Allied merchant ships were damaged by U-boats totaling 23,992 tons.  
   
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Friday, May 3, 1940  
  The French destroyer Bison was sunk by German aircraft about 110 miles west of Vega Island, Norway as it was leaving the Namsos area. Of the ships complement and passengers, 103 died and the survivors were rescued by the destroyers HMS Afridi (F 07), HMS Imperial (D 09), and HMS Grenade (H 86). The HMS Afridi would be sunk later that day.  
   
  While escorting a convoy from Namsos the destroyer HMS Afridi (F 07) was sunk by German aircraft off the Norwegian coast. Of the ships complement and passengers, 49 of Afridi’s crew, 13 men of 146th Brigade and 30 of the 69 just rescued from the French destroyer Bison were killed and the survivors were rescued by the destroyers HMS Griffin (H 31) and HMS Imperial (D 09).  
   
  Tuesday, May 6, 1941  
  The ocean boarding vessel HMS Camito (F 77) was torpedoed and then sunk by gunfire by the U-97, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Udo Heilmann, west of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 28 died and the survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Orchis (K 76).  
   
  Tuesday, May 13, 1941  
  The armed merchant cruiser HMS Salopian (F 94) was escorting the convoy SC-30 about 400 miles southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean when it was torpedoed and sunk by the U-98, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Robert Gysae. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 278 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Impulsive (D 11).  
   
  Wednesday, May 29, 1940  
  The destroyer HMS Wakeful (H 88), commanded by Commander Ralph L. Fisher, was torpedoed and sunk by German motor torpedo boat S-30 while participating in the evacuation of troops from Dunkirk.  
   
  While participating in the evacuation of troops at Dunkirk the destroyer HMS Grafton (H 89) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-62, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Bernhard Michalowski.  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  Friday, May 9, 1941  
  The U-110 was damaged in action with the destroyers HMS Bulldog (H 91) and HMS Broadway (H 90) and the corvette HMS Aubretia (K 96). A boarding party from the HMS Bulldog recovered a veritable cryptanalysis windfall, including an intact enigma machine and important current codes. The HMS Broadway was damaged in the encounter by a collision with U-110. The U-boat was allowed to sink the following day to preserve the secret of the capture. Of the ship's complement 15 died and 32 survived. The U-110's commanding officer, Kapitänleutnant Fritz-Julius Lemp (who had been in command of the U-30 when she sank the British liner Athenia on September 3, 1939) was not among the survivors rescued.  During its career under apitänleutnant Lemp the U-110 sank or damaged irreparably 3 merchant ships for a total of 10,149 tons, and damaged 2 merchant ships for a total of 8,675 tons. Kapitänleutnant Lemp was considered one of Germany’s top U-boat aces.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Thursday, May 1, 1941  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Samsø was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Viktor Schütze, southwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 19 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 1,494 ton Samsø was carrying groundnuts and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-121, the British steam passenger ship Nerissa was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Erich Topp, southeast of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 207 died and 83 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Veteran (D 72). The 5,583 ton Nerissa was carrying passengers and general cargo, including aluminum, motor trucks, and shells and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Friday, May 2, 1941  
  A straggler from Convoy HX-121, the British motor tanker Capulet was torpedoed and sunk by the U-201, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Adalbert Schnee, south of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 9 died and 35 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Douglas (D 90) and the British rescue ship Zaafaran. The 8,190 ton Capulet was carrying fuel oil and was bound for Scapa Flow, Scotland.  
   
  Saturday, May 3, 1941  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Wray Castle was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Viktor Schütze, about 110 miles south-southwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 56 survivors were picked up by the Portuguese steam merchant Angola. The 4,253 ton Wray Castle was carrying sugar and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian motor merchant Taranger was sunk by gunfire and torpedo by the U-95, commanded by Gerd Schreiber, about 150 miles southwest of Reykjavik in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 32 survivors were picked up by the HMS Begonia (K 66) and the Icelandic motor fishing vessel Sigurfari (MB 95). The 4,873 ton Taranger was carrying ballast and was bound for Vancouver, British Columbia.  
   
  Sunday, May 4, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-310, the Swedish steam merchant Japan was torpedoed and sunk by the U-38, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Liebe, about 250 miles northwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone. Of the ship’s complement, all 54 survived reached land by lifeboat. The 5,230 ton Japan was carrying general cargo and coal and was bound for the Middle East.  
   
  Monday, May 5, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-309, the British motor merchant Queen Maud was torpedoed and sunk by the U-38, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Liebe, west of Freetown, Sierra Leone in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 43 survivors were picked up by the Portuguese merchant Mirandella. The 4,976 ton Queen Maud was carrying coal and government stores, including aircraft parts and was bound for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  Tuesday, May 6, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-310, the British motor merchant Dunkwa was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Viktor Schütze, about 215 miles west-northwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 39 survivors were picked up by the Dutch steam merchant Polydorus. The 4,752 ton Dunkwa was carrying general cargo and government stores and was bound for Opobo, Nigeria.  
   
  The unescorted British motor merchant Surat was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103 northwest of Freetown. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 61 survivors were picked up by the British hopper barge Foremost 102. The 5,529 ton Surat was carrying pig iron, peas, and rapeseed and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OG-59, the British steam merchant Oakdene was torpedoed and sunk by the U-105, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg Schewe, northwest of St. Paul Rocks in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 35 survived and were picked up by the heavy cruiser HMS Dorsetshire (40). The 4,255 ton Oakdene was carrying coal and was bound for Buenos Aires, Argentina.  
   
  The 166 ton Faroese steam trawler Emanuel was sunk by gunfire by the U-556, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Wohlfarth, near the Faroe Islands in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died.  
   
  The blockade runner Sangro, which had been captured on May 1, 1941, was being escorted to the United Kingdom by British ocean boarding vessel HMS Camito (F 77) when the two ships were torpedoed and sank by the U-97, commanded by Udo Heilmann, west-southwest of Cape Clear, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the Sangro’s complement, 8 survivors and of the HMS Camito’s complement 28 died. The survivors of both ships were picked up by the corvette HMS Orchis (K 76). The 6,466 ton Sangro was carrying oil and grease.  
   
  Wednesday, May 7, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy OB-318, the Norwegian steam merchant Eastern Star was torpedoed and sunk by the U-94, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Kuppisch, approximately 200 miles southwest of Reykjavik, Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 40 survived and were picked up by the ASW trawler HMS Daneman (FY 123). The 5,658 ton Eastern Star was carrying general cargo, naphthaline, cresylic acid, and 16 aircraft in boxes and was bound for Halifax, Canada.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-318, the British steam merchant Ixion was torpedoed and sunk by the U-94 approximately 200 miles southwest of Reykjavik. Of the ship’s complement, all 105 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMS Marigold (K 87). The 10,263 ton Ixion was carrying general cargo, including whisky, and bags of mail and was bound for Halifax, Canada.  
   
  Thursday, May 8, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-317, the British steam merchant Ramillies was torpedoed and sunk by the U-97, commanded by Udo Heilmann, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 29 died and 12 survivors were picked up by the British merchant Geddington Court. The 4,553 ton Ramillies was carrying coke and was bound for Baltimore, Maryland.  
   
  Friday, May 9, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-313, the British steam merchant City of Winchester was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Viktor Schütze, about 400 miles south-southwest of the Cape Verde Islands in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 92 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian motor merchant Herma. The 7,120 ton City of Winchester was carrying general cargo and was bound for Beira, Mozambique.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-318, the British steam merchant Bengore Head was torpedoed and sunk by the U-110, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Fritz-Julius Lemp, east of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 40 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Aubretia (K 96). The 2,609 ton Bengore Head was carrying coal and binder twine and was bound for Montreal, Canada.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-318, the British steam merchant Esmond was torpedoed and sunk by the U-110, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Fritz-Julius Lemp, east of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 50 survived and were picked up by the Norwegian merchant Borgfred. The 4,976 ton Esmond was carrying ballast and was bound for Sydney, Nova Scotia.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-318, the British steam merchant Gregalia was torpedoed and sunk by the U-201, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Adalbert Schnee, east-northeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 66 survived and were picked up by the ASW trawler HMS Daneman (FY 123). The 5,802 ton Gregalia was carrying ballast and was bound for Buenos Aires, Argentina.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-318, the 5,969 ton British steam merchant Empire Cloud was torpedoed and damaged by the U-201 northeast of Cape Farewell.  
   
  Saturday, May 10, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-318, the British steam merchant Empire Caribou was torpedoed and sunk by the U-556, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Wohlfarth, approximately 465 miles southwest of Reykjanes, Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 34 died and 11 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Malcolm (D 19). The 4,861 ton Empire Caribou was carrying chalk and was bound for Boston, Massachusetts.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-318, the Belgian steam merchant Gand was torpedoed and sunk by the U-556 approximately 210 miles southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 43 survived. The 5,086 ton Gand was carrying ballast and was bound for Sydney, Nova Scotia.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-318, the 4,986 ton British steam merchant Aelybryn was torpedoed and damaged by the U-556 southeast of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 44 survivors were picked up by the ASW Trawler HMS Daneman (FY 123).  
   
  Sunday, May 11, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-313, the British steam merchant City of Shanghai was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Viktor Schütze, near St. Paul Rocks in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 67 survivors were picked up by the British motor merchant Richmond Castle and the Argentinean steam merchant Josefina S. The 5,828 ton City of Shanghai was carrying government cargo and deck cargo and was bound for Turkey.  
   
  Tuesday, May 13, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-312, the British steam merchant Benvrackie was torpedoed and sunk by the U-105, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg Schewe, about 700 miles southwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 28 died and 55 survivors were picked up by the British hospital ship HMHS Oxfordshire. The 6,434 ton Benvrackie was carrying general cargo, including silver and one Gypsy Moth aircraft and was bound for Beira, Mozambique.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SC-30, the British steam merchant Somersby was torpedoed and sunk by the U-111, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wilhelm Kleinschmidt, southwest of Reykjavik, Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 43 survived and were picked up by the Greek steam merchant Marika Protopapa. The 5,170 ton Somersby was carrying grain and was bound for Hull, England.  
   
  Thursday, May 15, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-314, the British steam merchant Benvenue was torpedoed and sunk by the U-105, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg Schewe, about 420 miles southwest by west of Freetown, Sierra Leone, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 55 survivors were picked up by the British steam passenger ship Empire Trader. The 5,920 ton Benvenue was carrying general cargo and six aircraft and was bound for Karachi, India.  
   
  The 488 ton French sailing ship Notre Dame du Châtelet was sunk by gunfire by the U-43, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wolfgang Lüth, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 28 died and 10 survived.  
   
  Friday, May 16, 1941  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Rodney Star was torpedoed and sunk by the U-105, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg Schewe, about 420 miles west-southwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 83 survived and were picked up by the destroyer HMS Boreas (H 77). The 11,803 ton Rodney Star was carrying refrigerated and general cargo and was bound for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  Saturday, May 17, 1941  
  The unescorted Dutch motor tanker Marisa was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günter Hessler, off the western coast of Africa in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 47 survived. The 8,029 ton Marisa was carrying ballast and was bound for Curaçao, England.  
   
  Sunday, May 18, 1941  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Piako was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günter Hessler, about 130 miles southwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 10 died and 65 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Bridgewater (U 01). The 8,286 ton Piako was carrying refrigerated goods, zinc, butter, meat, and mail and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Monday, May 19, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy HG-61, the British steam merchant Empire Ridge was torpedoed and sunk by the U-96, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Lehmann-Willenbrock, about 90 miles west of Bloody Foreland, Ireland in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 31 died and 2 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Vanquisher (D 54). The 2,922 ton Empire Ridge was carrying iron ore and was bound for Workington, England.  
   
  Tuesday, May 20, 1941  
  A straggler from Convoy HX-126, the British steam merchant Harpagus was torpedoed and sunk by the U-109, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans-Georg Fischer, about 250 miles south-southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 58 died and 40 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Burnham (H 82). The 5,173 ton Harpagus was carrying grain and was bound for Barry Roads, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-126, the British motor tanker British Security was torpedoed and sunk by the U-556, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Wohlfarth, south of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 53 died. The 8,470 ton British Security was carrying benzine and kerosene and was bound for Bowling, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-126, the British steam merchant Cockaponset was torpedoed and sunk by the U-556, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Wohlfarth, south of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 41 survived and were picked up by the Dutch rescue ship Hontestroom. The 5,995 ton Cockaponset was carrying steel, carbon black, TNT, trucks, and general cargo and was bound for Cardiff, Wales.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-126, the British motor merchant Darlington Court was torpedoed and sunk by the U-556 south of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, 28 died and 12 survivors were picked up by the Dutch rescue ship Hontestroom. The 4,974 ton Darlington Court was carrying wheat and aircraft and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy HX-126, the Norwegian motor tanker John P. Pedersen was torpedoed and sunk by the U-94, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Kuppisch, approximately 160 miles south of Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 22 died and 16 survivors were picked up by the Dutch rescue ship Hontestroom. The 6,128 ton John P. Pedersen was carrying Admiralty fuel oil and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-126, the British steam merchant Norman Monarch was torpedoed and sunk by the U-94 approximately 200 miles south-southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland. Of the ship’s complement, all 48 survived and were picked up by the destroyer HMS Burnham (H 82). The 4,718 ton Norman Monarch was carrying wheat and was bound for Barry Roads, England.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy HX-126, the British steam merchant Rothermere was torpedoed and sunk by the U-98, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Robert Gysae, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 22 died and 34 survivors were picked up by the Icelandic steam merchant Bruarfoss. The 5,356 ton Rothermere was carrying steel, newsprint, and paper pulp and was bound for London, England.  
   
  The British motor merchant Javanese Prince was torpedoed and sunk by the U-138, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Franz Gramitzky, about 155 miles northwest of the Butt of Lewis, Outer Hebrides in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 58 survivors were picked up by the destroyers HMS Faulknor (H 62) and HMS Lincoln (G 42) and the rescue tug HMS Assurance (W 59). The 8,593 ton Javanese Prince was carrying ballast and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Wednesday, May 21, 1941  
  The unarmed and neutral American steam merchant Robin Moor was stopped by blinker light by U-69 approximately 700 miles off the west coast of Africa. After questioning the chief mate that came aboard the U-boat, Metzler told him that he has to sink the ship according to the prize rules and ordered the crew to leave their ship in 30 minutes. After the crew abandoned the ship the U-69 torpedoed and sank the Robin Moor. The survivors were picked up by a British merchant and the Brazilian steam merchant Ozório. The 4,999 ton Robin Moor was carrying general cargo, including engines and vehicles and was bound for Lourenço Marques, Mozambique.The incident helped prompt U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt to announce an "unlimited national emergency" on May 27, 1941.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Tewkesbury was torpedoed and sunk by the U-69 southwest of Monrovia, Liberia in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 42 survived and were picked up by the American merchant Exhibitor and the American steam merchant Knoxville City. The 4,601 ton Tewkesbury was carrying general cargo, wheat and canned meat and was bound for Oban, Scotland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-126, the Dutch motor tanker Elusa was torpedoed and sunk by the U-93, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Claus Korth, east of Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 49 survived. The 6,235 ton Elusa was carrying gasoline and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-322, the British steam merchant Marconi was torpedoed and sunk by the U-98, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Robert Gysae, south-southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 22 died and 56 survivors were picked up by the patrol vessel USCGC General Greene (WPC 140). The 7,402 ton Marconi was carrying ballast.  
   
  Thursday, May 22, 1941  
  The unescorted British steam tanker British Grenadier was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Viktor Schütze, southwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 49 survived and were picked up by the Spanish tanker Jose Calvo Sotelo. The 6,857 ton British Grenadier was carrying ballast and was bound for Aruba.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy HX-126, the British steam merchant Barnby was torpedoed and sunk by the U-111, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wilhelm Kleinschmidt, southwest of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 44 survived. The 4,813 ton Barnby was carrying flour and was bound for Hull, England.  
   
  Friday, May 23, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-318, the Dutch motor merchant Berhala was torpedoed and sunk by the U-38, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Liebe, about 250 miles off Freetown, Sierra Leone, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 59 survivors were picked up by a British warship. The 6,622 ton Berhala was carrying general cargo, including tinplates, locomotives, and aircraft and was bound for Turkey and Greece.  
   
  Saturday, May 24, 1941  
  The unescorted Greek steam merchant Marionga was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Viktor Schütze, off the western coast of Africa in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 26 died and 5 survived. The 4,236 ton Marionga was carrying British government stores and was bound for Takoradi, Ghana.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-318, the British steam merchant Vulcain was torpedoed and sunk by the U-38, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Liebe, about 160 miles northwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 34 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 4,362 ton Vulcain was carrying coal and was bound for Freetown, Sierra Leone.  
   
  Sunday, May 25, 1941  
  The unescorted Egyptian steam merchant Radames was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Viktor Schütze, off the Liberian coast in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. The 3,575 ton Radames was carrying iron ore, groundnuts, and groundnut cake and was bound for Barry Roads, England.  
   
  The unescorted Dutch steam merchant Wangi Wangi was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103 approximately 90 miles south of Monrovia, Liberia. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 92 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 7,789 ton Wangi Wangi was carrying steel billets, lead, and general cargo and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Tuesday, May 27, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-318, the British steam merchant Colonial was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günter Hessler, about 200 miles west-northwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 100 survived and were picked up by the target ship HMS Centurion (I 50). The 5,108 ton Colonial was carrying general cargo and was bound for Beira, Mozambique.  
   
  Wednesday, May 28, 1941  
  The unescorted Greek steam merchant Papalemos was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günter Hessler, off the western coast of Africa in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 27 survived. The 3,748 ton Papalemos was carrying grain and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Thursday, May 29, 1941  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Tabaristan was torpedoed and sunk by the U-38, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Liebe, about 250 miles southwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 21 died and 39 survivors were picked up by the ASW trawler HMS Bengali (FY 165) and the armed trawler HMS Turcoman (FY 130). The 6,251 ton Tabaristan was carrying groundnuts, pig iron, manganese ore, and general cargo and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-128, the British steam merchant Empire Storm was torpedoed and sunk by the U-557, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ottokar Arnold Paulssen, south of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 40 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian merchant Marita. The 7,290 ton Empire Storm was carrying grain and flour and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Friday, May 30, 1941  
  The unescorted British motor merchant Silveryew was torpedoed and sunk by the U-106, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jürgen Oesten, west of the Cape Verde Islands in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 53 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 6,373 ton Silveryew was carrying pig iron, kernels, manganese ore, and kyanite ore and was bound for London, England.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Empire Protector was torpedoed and sunk by the U-38, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Liebe, southwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 33 survivors were picked up by the Dutch steam merchant Arundo. The 6,181 ton Empire Protector was carrying cotton, cotton seed, and copper and was bound for London, England.  
   
  Saturday, May 31, 1941  
  The unescorted British motor merchant Clan Macdougall was torpedoed and sunk by the U-106, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jürgen Oesten, north of the Cape Verde Islands in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 85 survived. The 6,843 ton Clan Macdougall was carrying general cargo and was bound for East London, South Africa.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-320, the British steam merchant Sire was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günter Hessler, west-southwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 46 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Marguerite (K 54). The 5,664 ton Sire was carrying ballast and was bound for Pepel, Sierra Leone.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-127, the British steam merchant Gravelines was torpedoed and damaged by the U-147, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Eberhard Wetjen, northwest of Bloody Foreland, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 11 died and 25 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Deptford (L 53). The 2,491 ton Gravelines was carrying timber and was bound for London, England. The afterpart of the Gravelines sank and the forepart was towed to the Clyde and beached at Kames Bay and the vessel was declared a total loss.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian steam merchant Rinda was torpedoed and sunk by the U-38, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Liebe, off Liberia in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 13 died and 18 survivors were picked up by the ASW trawler HMS Pict (FY 132). The 6,029 ton Rinda was carrying general cargo, including cotton balls and was bound for the United Kingdom. Among the survivors of the Rinda was a cat, that was found swimming in the ocean by the lifeboat during the night. She remained on board of the HMS Pict and was renamed Rinda.  
   
  The U-69, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jost Metzler, fired one torpedo at the British motor merchant Sangara lying at anchor in the roads of Accra harbor in Ghana in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. The 5,445 ton Sangara sank by the stern in 33 feet of water with her bow still visible above the water.  
   
  The 16 ton Icelandic motor fishing vessel Holmsteinn was sunk by gunfire by the U-204, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Walter Kell, north-northwest of Dyrafjord, Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 4 died.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  Friday, May 2, 1941  
  The fifth "Lake"-class U.S. Coast Guard cutter, authorized for transfer on April 10 under the Lend-Lease Act, was turned over to the Royal Navy. The USCGS Chelan became the HMS Lulworth (Y 60).  
   
  Tuesday, May 6, 1941  
  In a radio address U.S. Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson advocated use of the U.S. Navy to convoy merchant ships to Britain: “The world is facing so great a crisis that all of our efforts must be turned toward the defense of our nation's safety. . . . our own self-defense requires that limits should be put to lawless aggression on the ocean. The President has said that we must not allow the steps which we have already taken to become ineffective.”  
   
  Friday, May 9, 1941  
  U.S. Navy Task Group 1, comprised of the aircraft carrier Ranger (CV 4), the heavy cruiser USS Vincennes (CA 44), and destroyers USS Sampson (DD 394) and USS Eberle (DD 430), set out from Bermuda to begin a 4,675-mile neutrality patrol that would conclude at Bermuda on May 23.  
   
  Monday, May 12, 1941  
  Three "Lake"-class Coast Guard cutters, authorized for transfer on April 10 under the Lend-Lease Act, were turned over to the Royal Navy. The USCGS Champlain became the HMS Sennen (Y 21), the USCGS Sebago became the HMS Walney (Y 04), and the USCGS Cayuga became the HMS Totland (Y 88).  
   
  Tuesday, May 20, 1941  
  The ninth "Lake"-class Coast Guard cutter, authorized for transfer on April 10 under the Lend-Lease Act, was turned over to the Royal Navy. The USCGS Shoshone became the HMS Languard (Y 56).  
   
  U.S. Navy Task Group 2, under command of Rear Admiral Robert C. Giffen, comprised of the aircraft carrier USS Wasp (CV 7), the heavy cruiser USS Quincy (CA 39) and destroyers USS Livermore (DD 429) and USS Kearny (DD 432), departed Bermuda to conduct a 4,170-mile neutrality patrol that would conclude at Bermuda on June 3.  
   
  Thursday, May 29, 1941  
  U.S. Navy Task Group 3, comprising the aircraft carrier USS Ranger (CV 4), heavy cruiser USS Tuscaloosa (CA 37), and the destroyers USS McDougal (DD 358) and USS Eberle (DD 430), departed Bermuda for a 4,355-mile neutrality patrol that will conclude there on June 8.  
   
  Friday, May 30, 1941  
  The last "Lake"-class Coast Guard cutter, authorized for transfer on April 10 under the Lend-Lease Act, was transferred to the Royal Navy. The USCGS Itasca became the HMS Gorleston (Y 92).  
   
  Saturday, May 31, 1941  
  U.S. Navy Task Group 1, under command of Rear Admiral Arthur B. Cook, comprisied of the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown (CV 5), heavy cruiser USS Vincennes (CA 44), and destroyers USS Sampson (DD 394) and USS Gwin (DD 433), departed Bermuda for a 4,550-mile neutrality patrol that would conclude at Hampton Roads, Virginia, on June 12.  
     
   
     
   
 

The objective of WW2Timelines.com is to provide a day by day account of the events that lead up to and were part of the greatest conflict known to mankind. There are accounts for the activities of each particular day and timelines for subjects and personalities. It is the of this website intent to provide an unbiased account of the war. Analysis, effects caused by an event, or prior or subsequent pertinent events are presented separately and indicated as text that is italicized.

 
   
  Copyright 2011
WW2timelines.com
Contact us using our email page