June 1941 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
 
  Overview  
  4 U-boats were sunk by Allied warships.  
   
  58 Allied or neutral merchant ships were sunk by U-boats totaling 301,620 tons.  
  4 Allied merchant ships were damaged by U-boats totaling 31,026 tons.  
   
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Thursday, June 12, 1941  
  Fourteen Beaufighters of Nos. 22 and 42 Squadrons departed from bases in Scotland and torpedoed the German battleship Lutzow which had been sighted off the Norwegian coast by a No. 114 Squadron Blenheim. The Lutzow returned to port at Kiel for repairs and would not return to service until January 1942.  
   
  Friday, June 20, 1941  
  The battleship USS Texas (BB 35) and destroyers USS Mayrant (DD 402), USS Rhind (DD 404), and USS Trippe (DD 403) were sighted by the U-203 within what the German navy regarded as the war, or "blockade" zone in the Atlantic Ocean. The American force, however, unaware of the U-boat, outdistanced the submarine and frustrated its attempted attack. In the wake of this incident, the commander in chief of the German navy (Grand Admiral Erich Raeder) ordered that American warships could only be attacked if they crossed the western boundary of the blockade area by 20 or more miles, or within the 20-mile strip along the western edge of the blockade zone.  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  Monday, June 2, 1941  
  The U-147, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Eberhard Wetjen, was sunk northwest of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean by depth charges from the destroyer HMS Wanderer (D 74) and the corvette HMS Periwinkle (K 55). All of the ship’s complement of 26 died. The U-147 had just torpedoed and damaged the Belgian motor merchant Mokambo. During its career under two commanders the U-147 sank 2 ships for a total of 6,145 tons, damaged 1 ship for a total of 4,996 tons, and damaged irreparably 1 ship for a total of 2,491 tons.  
   
  Wednesday, June 18, 1941  
  The U-138, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Franz Gramitzky, was sunk west of Cadiz, Spain in the eastern Atlantic Ocean by depth charges from the destroyers HMS Faulknor (H 62), HMS Fearless (H 67), HMS Forester (H 74), HMS Foresight (H 68), and HMS Foxhound (H 69). Of the ship’s complement, all 27 survived. During its career under two commanders the U-138 sank 6 ships for a total of 48,564 tons and damaged 1 ship for a total of 6,993 tons.  
   
  Friday, June 27, 1941  
  The U-556, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Wohlfarth, was sunk southwest of Iceland in the North Atlantic Ocean by depth charges from the corvettes HMS Nasturtium (K 107), HMS Celandine (K 75), and HMS Gladiolus (K 34). Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 41 survived. During its career under Kapitänleutnant Wohlfarth the U-556 sank 6 ships for a total of 29,552 tons and damaged 1 ship for a total of 4,986 tons. Kapitänleutnant Wohlfarth was among the survivors and was considered one of Germany’s top U-boat aces.  
   
  Sunday, June 29, 1941  
  The U-651, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Peter Lohmeyer, was sunk south of Iceland n the North Atlantic Ocean by depth charges from the destroyers HMS Malcolm (D 19) and HMS Scimitar (H 21), the corvettes HMS Arabis (K 73) and HMS Violet (K 35), and the minesweeper HMS Speedwell (J 87). Of the ship’s complement, all 45 survived. During its career under Kapitänleutnant Lohmeyer the U-651 sank 2 ships for a total of 11,639 tons.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Sunday, June 1, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-319, the British steam merchant Scottish Monarch was torpedoed and sunk by the U-105, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg Schewe, southwest of the Cape Verde Islands in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 44 survivors were picked up by the Dutch motor merchant Alphard and the British steam merchant Christine Marie. The 4,719 ton Scottish Monarch was carrying coal and was headed for Freetown, Sierra Leone.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-320, the British motor merchant Alfred Jones was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günter Hessler, 140 miles west-southwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and 62 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Marguerite (K 54). The 5,013 ton Alfred Jones was carrying RAF planes, lorries and steel and was headed for Bathurst, Gambia.  
   
  Monday, June 2, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-327, the British steam merchant Michael E. was torpedoed and sunk by the U-108, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Klaus Scholtz, southwest of Cape Clear, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 59 survivors were picked up by the Dutch motor merchant Alcinous. The 7,628 ton Michael E. was carrying ballast and was headed for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OB-329, the Belgian motor merchant Mokambo was torpedoed and damaged by the U-147, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Eberhard Wetjen, northwest of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 47 survived. The 4,996 ton Mokambo was carrying general cargo and was bound for Freetown, Sierra Leone. The U-147 would subsequently be sunk by the Mokambo’s escorts.  
   
  Tuesday, June 3, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-327, the Dutch steam merchant Eibergen was torpedoed and sunk by the U-75, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmuth Ringelmann, about 600 miles north of the Azores in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 35 survivors were picked up by a British destroyer. The 4,801 ton Eibergen was headed for West Africa.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-327, the British motor tanker Inversuir was torpedoed and sunk by the U-75 north of the Azores. Of the ship’s complement, all 45 survived and were picked up by the Norwegian steam merchant Para. The 9,456 ton Inversuir was carrying ballast and was headed for Aruba.  
   
  Wednesday, June 4, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-327, the British steam merchant Trecarrell was torpedoed and sunk by the U-101, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Mengersen, west of Cape Race, Newfoundland in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 43 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Cornerbrook. The 5,271 ton Trecarrell was carrying ballast and was headed for Father Point, New Brunswick.  
   
  The 2,879 ton British suction dredger Robert Hughes struck a mine laid in the entrance to Lagos Harbor, Nigeria and sank. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and 17 survivors were picked up by the harbor craft.  
   
  Thursday, June 5, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-328, the British motor tanker Wellfield was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Schultze, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 34 survivors were picked up by the British steam tanker British Ardour. The 6,054 ton Wellfield was carrying ballast and was headed for Curaçao.  
   
  Friday, June 6, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-324, the British steam merchant Sacramento Valley was torpedoed and sunk by the U-106, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jürgen Oesten, west of the Cape Verde Islands in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 46 survivors were picked up by the Panamanian steam tanker Stanvac Cape Town. The 4,573 ton Sacramento Valley was carrying coal and was headed for Pernambuco, Brazil.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-328, the Dutch steam merchant Yselhaven was torpedoed and sunk by the U-43, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wolfgang Lüth, about 600 miles east of Newfoundland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 24 died and 10 survivors were picked up by the Finnish steam merchant Hammarland. The 4,802 ton Yselhaven was carrying ballast and was headed for Canada.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-329, the British steam merchant Tregarthen was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Schultze, north-northwest of the Azores in the central Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 45 died. The 5,201 ton Tregarthen was carrying coal and was headed for Kingston, Jamaica.  
   
  Sunday, June 8, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-324, the British steam merchant Elmdene was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Viktor Schütze, about 200 miles west-southwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 36 survived and were picked up by the American steam merchant Carlton. The 4,853 ton Elmdene was carrying coal, munitions, and 20 aircraft and was headed for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-323, the/ British motor passenger ship Adda was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günter Hessler, about 80 miles west-southwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 10 died and 415 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Cyclamen (K 83). The 7,816 ton Adda was carrying general cargo and passengers and was headed for Lagos, Nigeria.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-328, the British steam merchant Baron Nairn was torpedoed and sunk by the U-108, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Klaus Scholtz, west of Cape Race, Newfoundland in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 39 survived. The 3,164 ton Baron Nairn was carrying ballast and was headed for Nuevitas, Cuba.  
   
  The unescorted Greek steam merchant Dirphys was torpedoed and sunk by the U-108 approximately 600 miles east of Newfoundland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 19 survived. The 4,240 ton Dirphys was carrying anthracite and was headed for Montreal, Canada.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Kingston Hill was torpedoed and sunk by the U-38, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Liebe, southwest of the Cape Verde Islands in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and 48 survivors were picked up by the American steam tanker Alabama. The 7,628 ton Kingston Hill was carrying coal and general cargo and was headed for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-329, the Dutch motor tanker Pendrecht was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Schultze, about 500 miles northwest of the Azores in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 36 survived and were picked up by the British steam merchant Alresford, the submarine HMS Pandora (N 42), and the American passenger ship Excalibur. The 10,746 ton Pendrecht was carrying ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted British motor tanker Ensis was torpedoed and damaged by the U-46, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Engelbert Endrass, southwest of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The 6,207 ton Ensis was carrying ballast and was bound for Curacao.  
     
  Monday, June 9, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-329, the British steam merchant Trevarrack was torpedoed and sunk by the U-101, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Mengersen, southwest of Cape Clear, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 45 died. The 5,270 ton Trevarrack was carrying ballast and was headed for Montreal, Canada.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-330, the British steam merchant Phidias was sunk by gunfire by the U-46, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Engelbert Endrass, north of the Azores in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 43 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Embassage. The 5,623 ton Phidias was carrying government stores, including ammunition and 14 aircraft and was headed for Capetown, South Africa.  
   
  Tuesday, June 10, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-329, the Norwegian steam merchant Christian Krohg was torpedoed and sunk by the U-108, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Klaus Scholtz, in the central Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 23 died. The 1,992 ton Christian Krohg was carrying ballast and was headed for Canada.  
   
  The unescorted Belgian steam merchant Mercier was torpedoed and sunk by the U-204, commanded by Kapitänleutnant U-204, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 61 survived. The 7,886 ton Mercier was carrying ballast, mail, and training aircraft as deck cargo and was headed for Montreal, Canada.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Ainderby was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Erich Topp, 130 miles west by north of Bloody Foreland, Ireland in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 12 died and 29 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Veteran (D 72). The 4,860 ton Ainderby was carrying iron ore and was headed for Tyne, England.  
   
  Wednesday, June 11, 1941  
  The unescorted Norwegian steam merchant Havtor was torpedoed and sunk by the U-79, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wolfgang Kaufmann, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 14 survivors were picked up by the motor fishing vessel Pilot. The 1,524 ton Havtor was carrying ballast and was headed for Pictou, Nova Scotia.  
   
  Thursday, June 12, 1941  
  The British motor merchant Silverpalm was torpedoed and sunk by the U-371, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Driver, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 68 died. The 6,373 ton Silverpalm was carrying general cargo and was headed for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Empire Dew was torpedoed and sunk by the U-48, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Schultze, north of the Azores in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 23 died and 19 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian destroyer St. Albans (I 15). The 7,005 ton Empire Dew was carrying ballast and was headed for Father Point, New Brunswick.  
   
  The unescorted British motor merchant Chinese Prince was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Erich Topp, south of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 45 died and 19 survivors were picked up by the corvettes HMS Arbutus (K 86) and HMS Pimpernel (K 71). The 8,593 ton Chinese Prince was carrying general cargo, including potash, currants, and magnesite and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OG-64, the Norwegian steam tanker Ranella was torpedoed and sunk by the U-553, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Karl Thurmann, in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 29 survived and reached the Azores by lifeboat. The 5,590 ton Ranella was carrying ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OG-64, the British steam merchant Susan Mærsk was torpedoed and sunk by the U-553 in the central Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 24 died. The 2,355 ton Susan Mærsk was carrying ballast and was headed for Curaçao.  
   
  Friday, June 13, 1941  
  The unescorted Greek steam merchant Pandias was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günter Hessler, in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 11 died and 23 survived. The 4,981 ton Pandias was carrying coal, military goods and 11 Spitfire fighters and was headed for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-330, the British steam merchant Tresillian was torpedoed and sunk by gunfire by the U-77, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Heinrich Schonder, southeast of Cape Race, Newfoundland in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 46 survived and were picked up by the U.S. Coast Guard cutter USS Duane (WPG 33). The 4,743 ton Tresillian was carrying ballast and was headed for Canada.  
   
  Saturday, June 14, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OG-64, the British steam merchant St. Lindsay was torpedoed and sunk by the U-751, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Gerhard Bigalk, southwest of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 43 died. The 5,370 ton St. Lindsay was carrying general cargo and was headed for Buenos Aires, Argentina.  
   
  Tuesday, June 17, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy SL-76, the British motor merchant Cathrine was torpedoed and sunk by the U-43, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wolfgang Lüth, about 250 miles southwest of Cape Clear, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 24 died and 3 survivors were picked up by the British trawler Boreas. The 2,727 ton Cathrine was carrying manganese ore.  
   
  Wednesday, June 18, 1941  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Norfolk was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erich Topp, about 150 miles northwest of Malin Head, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 70 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Skate (H 39). The 10,948 ton Norfolk was carrying general cargo, including steel plates and mail and was headed for New Zealand.  
   
  Friday, June 20, 1941  
  The unescorted and neutral Portuguese steam merchant Ganda was torpedoed and sunk by the U-123, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Reinhard Hardegen, off Casablanca, Morocco in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 61 survived. The 4,333 ton Ganda was carrying general cargo, including port wine and was headed for Mozambique.  
   
  Sunday, June 22, 1941  
  The 2,379 ton British weather ship Arakaka was torpedoed and sunk by the U-77, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Heinrich Schonder, east of St. Johns, Newfoundland in the western Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 45 died.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy SL-76, the Swedish steam merchant Calabria was torpedoed and sunk by the U-141, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Philipp Schüler, 100 miles from Inishtrahull Lightship, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 21 survived. The 1,277 ton Calabria was carrying palm kernels and copra and was headed for Hull, England.  
   
  Tuesday, June 24, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy OB-336, the British motor merchant Kinross was torpedoed and sunk by the U-203, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Rolf Mützelburg, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 37 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMCS Orillia (K 119). The 4,956 ton Kinross was carrying ballast and was headed for Father Point, Canada.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-133, the Norwegian motor merchant Soløy was torpedoed and sunk by the U-203 in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 32 survived and were picked up by the British steam merchant Traveller. The 4,402 ton Soløy was carrying wheat and was headed for Hull, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-133, the Norwegian motor merchant Vigrid was torpedoed and sunk by the U-371, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Driver, about 400 miles southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 26 died and 21 survivors were picked up by the destroyers HMS Keppel (D 84) and USS Charles F. Hughes (DD-428). The 4,765 ton Vigrid was carrying general cargo, including spelter, copper, iron, and steel and was headed for Manchester, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-133, the British steam merchant Brockley Hill was torpedoed and sunk by the U-651, commanded by Peter Lohmeyer, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 42 survived and were picked up by the British steam merchant Saugor. The 5,297 ton Brockley Hill was carrying grain and was headed for London, England.  
   
  Wednesday, June 25, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OG-65, the Greek steam merchant Ellinico was torpedoed and sunk by the U-108, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Klaus Scholtz, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The 3,059 ton Ellinico was headed for Wabana, Newfoundland.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OG-65, the Greek steam merchant Pateras was torpedoed and sunk by the U-108 in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The 4,362 ton Pateras was carrying ballast and was headed for Father Point, Canada.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy OB-336, the Dutch steam merchant Schie was torpedoed and sunk by the U-75, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmuth Ringelmann, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 29 died. The 1,967 ton Schie was carrying Ballast and was headed for Curaçao.  
   
  The unescorted Greek steam merchant Anna Bulgaris was torpedoed and sunk by the U-77, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Schonder, south of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The 4,603 ton Anna Bulgaris was carrying ballast and was headed for Montreal, Canada.  
   
  Friday, June 27, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy SL-78, the Dutch steam merchant Oberon was torpedoed and sunk by the U-123, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Reinhard Hardegen, west-southwest of the Canary Islands in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 28 survivors were picked up by a British corvette. The 1,996 ton Oberon was carrying palm kernels and general cargo and was headed for Hull, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-78, the British steam merchant P.L.M. 22 was torpedoed and sunk by the U-123 west-southwest of the Canary Islands. Of the ship’s complement, 32 died and 12 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Armeria (K 187). The 5,646 ton P.L.M. 22 was carrying iron ore and was headed for Middlesbrough, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-133, the Dutch steam merchant Maasdam was torpedoed and sunk by the U-564, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Reinhard Suhren, approximately 300 miles south of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 78 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian motor tanker Havprins and another Norwegian vessel. The 8,812 ton Maasdam was headed for Liverpool, England. Among the survivors are U.S. Marines under Major Walter L. Jordan, USMC, the advance detail for the Marine Detachment at the American Embassy in London.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-133, the Dutch steam merchant British motor merchant Malaya II was torpedoed and sunk by the U-564 approximately 300 miles south of Iceland. Of the ship’s complement, 41 died and 6 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMCS Collingwood (K 180). The 8,651 ton Malaya II was carrying metal, wheat, and TNT and was headed for Cardiff, Wales.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-133, the 9,467 ton Norwegian motor tanker Kongsgaard was torpedoed and damaged by the U-564, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Reinhard Suhren, about 300 miles south of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-78, the British steam merchant Empire Ability was torpedoed and sunk by the U-69, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jost Metzler, approximately 200 miles southeast of the Azores in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 2 died and 107 survivors were picked up by the British motor merchant Amerika. The 7,603 ton Empire Ability was carrying sugar, rum, kernels, fiber, and passengers and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-78, the British steam merchant River Lugar was torpedoed and sunk by the U-69 approximately 200 miles southeast of the Azores. Of the ship’s complement, 38 died and 6 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Burdock (K 126). The 5,423 ton River Lugar was carrying iron ore and was headed for Barry Roads, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-133, the 10,356 ton Dutch motor tanker Tibia was torpedoed and damaged by the U-79, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wolfgang Kaufmann, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 50 survived.  
   
  Saturday, June 28, 1941  
  The unescorted Finnish steam merchant Pluto was torpedoed and sunk by the U-146, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Otto Ites, about 100 miles north-northwest of Butt of Lewis, Scotland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 36 survivors were picked up by the ASW trawler HMS Northern Duke (4.11). The 3,496 ton Pluto was carrying grain, coal, and oil and was headed for Petsamo, Finland.  
   
  Sunday, June 29, 1941  
  The 6,619 ton Italian steam merchant Ernani, disguised as the Dutch steam merchant Enggano. Schütze, was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Viktor Schütze, about 450 miles west of Las Palmas, Canary Islands in the eastern Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  The British steam merchant Rio Azul was torpedoed and sunk by the U-123, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Reinhard Hardegen, approximately 200 miles southeast of the Azores in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 33 died and 9 survivors were picked up by the armed merchant cruiser HMS Esperance Bay (F 67). The 4,088 ton Rio Azul was carrying iron ore and was headed for Middlesbrough, England.  
   
  The unescorted Icelandic steam merchant Hekla was torpedoed and sunk by the U-564, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Reinhard Suhren, south of Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 13 died and 6 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Candytuft (K 09). The 1,215 ton Hekla was carrying ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-133, the British steam merchant Grayburn was torpedoed and sunk by the U-651, commanded by Peter Lohmeyer, south of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 35 died and 18 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Violet (K 35). The 6,342 ton Grayburn was carrying scrap and steel and was headed for Swansea, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SL-78, the Greek steam merchant George J. Goulandris was torpedoed and sunk by the U-66, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Richard Zapp, west of the Canary Islands in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 28 survived. The 4,345 ton George J. Goulandris was carrying sugar and was headed for Leith Roads, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SL-78, the Greek steam merchant Kalypso Vergotti was torpedoed and sunk by the U-66, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Richard Zapp, west of the Canary Islands in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 36 died. The 5,686 ton Kalypso Vergotti was carrying iron ore and was headed for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  Monday, June 30, 1941  
  A straggler from Convoy SL-78, the British steam merchant Saint Anselm was torpedoed and sunk by the U-66, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Richard Zapp, west of Madeira in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 34 died and 33 survivors were picked up by the armed merchant cruiser HMS Moreton Bay (F 11) and the Spanish steam merchant Tom. The 5,614 ton Saint Anselm was carrying pig iron, linseed, and groundnuts and was headed for Hull, England.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  Sunday, June 1, 1941  
  No. 120 Squadron, RAF Coastal Command, formed at Nutts Corner, Northern Ireland, with American-built Consolidated Liberator long-range maritime patrol aircraft to fly against the U-Boat threat in the war in the North Atlantic.  
   
  South Greenland Patrol, under command of Commander Harold G. Belford, USCG, was established to operate from Cape Brewster to Cape Farewell to Upernivik, The Coast Guard cutters USCGS Modoc, USCGS Comanche, and USCGS Raritan, together with the unclassified auxiliary vessel Bowdoin (IX-50) made up the force.  
   
  Friday, June 6, 1941  
  The U.S. Ship Requisition Act was passed by the U.S. Congress and signed the same day by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Roosevelt issued Executive Order No. 8771 authorizing the U.S. Maritime Commission to take over certain foreign vessels. This allowed the U.S. Coast Guard to seize these vessels for the war effort. In all 105 ships totaling 554,991 tons were seized 40 from Denmark, 28 from Italy, 17 from Finland, 10 from France, 3 from Germany, 2 from Estonia, and one each from Lithuania, Rumania, Holland, Sweden, and Greece. 27 of the Italian ships and 1 German ship had been sabotaged by their crews.  
   
  Saturday, June 14, 1941  
  Central North Atlantic patrols commenced with battleship/destroyer task groups. The battleship USS Texas (BB 35) and accompanying destroyers would inaugurate these patrols.  
   
  Sunday, June 15, 1941  
  U.S. Navy Task Force 3, under command of Rear Admiral Jonas H. Ingram, began patrol operations from the Brazilian ports of Recife and Bahia. The force consisted of four Omaha (CL 4)-class light cruisers and five destroyers.  
   
  Friday, June 20, 1941  
  U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt addressed Congress and denounced the sinking of the American merchant steamship SS Robin Moor by the U-69 on May 21, 1941. "The total disregard shown for the most elementary principles of international law and of humanity brands the sinking of the Robin Moor as the act of an international outlaw." Roosevelt noted that the Robin Moor's destruction was a "warning that the United States may use the high seas of the world only with Nazi consent. Were we to yield on this we would inevitably submit to world-domination at the hands of the present leaders of the German Reich. We are not yielding," the President declared, "and we do not propose to yield." Undersecretary of State Sumner Welles sent this message to the German Embassy for the information of the German government. Read the text of the message.  
   
  U.S. Navy Task Group 2.6, comprised of the aircraft carrier USS Wasp (CV 7), heavy cruiser USS Tuscaloosa (CA 37), and destroyers USS Anderson (DD 411) and USS Rowan (DD 405), departed Hampton Roads for a 4,320-mile neutrality patrol that would conclude at Bermuda on July 4.  
   
  Wednesday, June 25, 1941  
  U.S. Navy Task Group 2.7, comprised of the  light cruisers USS Philadelphia (CL 41) and USS Savannah (CL 42) and destroyers USS Lang (DD 399) and USS Wilson (DD 408), departed Hampton Roads for a 4,762-mile neutrality patrol that will conclude on July 8 at Bermuda.  
   
  Sunday, June 29, 1941  
  U.S. Navy Task Group 2.8, comprised of the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown (CV 5), heavy cruisers USS Quincy (CA 39) and USS Vincennes (CA 44), and destroyers USS Wainwright (DD 419), USS Hammann (DD 412), USS Mustin (DD 413), and USS Stack (DD 406), departed Hampton Roads for a neutrality patrol. The USS Yorktown, accompanied by the USS Wainwright and USS Stack, departed the patrol on July 10, returning to Hampton Roads on the July 12. The USS Quincy, USS Vincennes, USS Hammann, and USS Mustin would continue the cruise, putting into Bermuda on July 15.  
     
   
     
   
 

The objective of WW2Timelines.com is to provide a day by day account of the events that lead up to and were part of the greatest conflict known to mankind. There are accounts for the activities of each particular day and timelines for subjects and personalities. It is the of this website intent to provide an unbiased account of the war. Analysis, effects caused by an event, or prior or subsequent pertinent events are presented separately and indicated as text that is italicized.

 
   
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