July 1941 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
  Overview  
  2 German capital ships were damaged by British air raids.  
   
  No U-boats were sunk in July 1941.  
   
  18 Allied or neutral merchant ships were sunk by U-boats totaling 61,676 tons.  
  3 Allied merchant ships were damaged by U-boats totaling 18,845 tons.  
   
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Tuesday, July 1, 1941  
  RAF Bomber Command attacked the port of Brest, France, and the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen was hit by a single bomb on the port side behind the bridge. The bomb detonated in the forward main artillery command center, killing 60 of the crew.  
   
  Saturday, July 5, 1941  
  The British troop transport Anselm was torpedoed and sunk by the U-96, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Lehmann-Willenbrock, about 300 miles north of the Azores in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 254 died and 1062 survivors were picked up by a survey ship and a corvette. The 5,954 ton Anselm was carrying RAF and military personnel and was headed for Freetown, Sierra Leone. The U-96 suffered enough damage in the counterattack by the Anselm’s escorts that it had to abort its patrol and return to port for repairs.  
   
  Monday, July 7, 1941  
  Task Force 19, commanded by Rear Admiral David McD. LeBreton, and consisting of six transports carrying Brigadier General John Marston's 1st Marine Brigade arrived in Reykjavik, Iceland to replace Major General Henry O. Curtis’ British 49th Division. Task Force 19 also included 2 battleships, 3 light cruisers, and 13 destroyers.  
   
  Tuesday, July 22, 1941  
  Intelligence was received that German battlecruiser SMS Scharnhorst had left the heavily defended base of Brest and had been sighted at La Pallice, France. RAF Bomber Command began immediate plans for an attack which would take place on June 24, 1941.  
   
  Thursday, July 24, 1941  
  The German battlecruiser SMS Scharnhorst was hit five times by bombs from a force of 15 Halifax bombers in the port of La Pallice, France.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Tuesday, July 1, 1941  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Toronto City was torpedoed and sunk by the U-108, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Klaus Scholtz, north of the Azores in the central Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 35 died. The 2,486 ton Toronto City was carrying ballast and was headed for St. John’s, Newfoundland.  
   
  Thursday, July 3, 1941  
  The armed British steam merchant Robert L. Holt was involved in a gun duel and sunk with the U-69, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jost Metzler, northwest of the Canary Islands in the central Atlantic Ocean. The Robert L. Holt had been the ship of commodore Vice Admiral Norman A. Wodehouse from the dispersed convoy OB-337. All of the ship’s complement of 48 died. The 2,918 ton Robert L. Holt was carrying ballast and was headed for Warri, Nigeria.  
   
  Friday, July 4, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-337, the British steam merchant Auditor was torpedoed and sunk by the U-123, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Reinhard Hardegen, about 600 miles northwest of the Cape Verde Islands in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 75 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 5,444 ton Auditor was carrying general cargo and 10 aircraft and was headed for Beira, Mozambique.  
   
  Wednesday, July 9, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-341, the British steam merchant Designer was torpedoed and sunk by the U-98, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Robert Gysae, north-northwest of the Azores in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 67 died and 11 survivors were picked up by the Portuguese sailing ship Souta Princesca. The 5,945 ton Designer was carrying military stores and mail and was headed for Capetown, South Africa.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OB-341, the British steam merchant Inverness was torpedoed and sunk by the U-98 north-northwest of the Azores. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 37 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 4,897 ton Inverness was carrying military stores and was headed for the Middle East.  
   
  Saturday, July 19, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OG-67, the British steam merchant Holmside was torpedoed and sunk by the U-66, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Richard Zapp, northeast of the Cape Verde Islands in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 21 died and 16 survivors were picked up by the Portuguese steam merchant Sete Cidades. The 3,433 ton Holmside was carrying ballast and was headed for Pepel, Sierra Leone.  
   
  Sunday, July 20, 1941  
  The unescorted British motor merchant Canadian Star was torpedoed and damaged by the U-126, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Bauer, approximately 650 miles west of Lands End, England in the in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The 8,293 ton Canadian Star was carrying passengers, general cargo, government stores, and mail and was bound for Auckland, New Zealand.  
   
  The unescorted 5,419 ton British motor merchant Palma was damaged by gunfire by the U-95, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Gerd Schreiber, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  Saturday, July 26, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy OS-1, the British steam merchant Botwey was torpedoed and sunk by the U-141, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Philipp Schüler, northwest of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 53 survived and were picked up by the British rescue ship Copeland. The 5,106 ton Botwey was carrying ballast and was headed for Port Sulphur, Louisiana.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OS-1, the British Motor merchant Atlantic City was torpedoed and damaged by the U-141 approximately 365 miles northwest of Bloody Foreland, Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, all 41 survived. The 5,133 ton Atlantic City was carrying general cargo, government stores, and coal and was bound for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  Sunday, July 27, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy OG-69, the British steam merchant Erato was torpedoed and sunk by the U-126, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Bauer, 200 miles west of Cape Finisterre off the west coast Spain in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 9 died and 27 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Begonia (K 66). The 1,335 ton Erato was carrying general cargo, military and naval stores and was headed for Gibraltar.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OG-69, the Norwegian steam merchant Inga I was torpedoed and sunk by the U-126 200 miles west of Cape Finisterre. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 16 survivors were picked up by an escort vessel. The 1,304 ton Inga I was carrying coal and coke and was headed for Gibraltar.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OG-69, the British steam merchant Hawkinge was torpedoed and sunk by the U-203, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Rolf Mützelburg, west of Cape Finisterre off the west coast Spain in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 15 died and 16 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Vanoc (H 33). The 2,475 ton Hawkinge was carrying coal and was headed for Lisbon, Portugal.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OG-69, the British steam merchant Kellwyn was torpedoed and sunk by the U-79, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wolfgang Kaufmann, about 350 miles west-northwest of Cape Finisterre off the west coast Spain in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and 9 survivors were picked up by the British armed trawler HMS St. Nectan. The 1,459 ton Kellwyn was carrying coke and was headed for Lisbon, Portugal.  
   
  Monday, July 27, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy OG-69, the British steam merchant Lapland was torpedoed and sunk by the U-203, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Rolf Mützelburg, northwest of Cape Finisterre off the west coast Spain in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 26 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMS Rhododendron (K 78). The 1,330 ton Lapland was carrying tinplate and general cargo and was headed for Lisbon, Portugal.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OG-69, the Swedish steam merchant Norita was torpedoed and sunk by the U-203 northwest of Cape Finisterre. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 18 survived. The 1,516 ton Norita was carrying coke and general cargo and was headed for Huelva, Spain.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OG-69, the British steam merchant Wrotham was torpedoed and sunk by the U-561, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Robert Bartels, west of Cape Finisterre off the west coast Spain in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 26 survived and were picked up by the corvettes HMS Fleur de Lys (K 122) and HMS Rhododendron (K 78). The 1,884 ton Wrotham was carrying ballast and was headed for Huelva, Spain.  
   
  Wednesday, July 30, 1941  
  Dispersed from Convoy OS-1, the British steam merchant Shahristan was torpedoed and sunk by the U-371, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Driver, southeast of the Azores in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 65 died and 76 survivors were picked up by the Spanish tanker Campeche, the corvette HMS Sunflower, and the armed merchant cruiser HMS Derbyshire (F 78). The 6,935 ton Shahristan was carrying passengers, government stores, and general cargo and was headed for Basrah, Iraq.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OS-1, the Dutch steam merchant Sitoebondo was torpedoed and sunk by the U-371, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Driver, southeast of the Azores in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 19 died and 65 survivors were picked up by the Spanish tankers Campeche and Campero. The 7,049 ton Sitoebondo was carrying general cargo and was headed for Calcutta, India.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  Tuesday, July 1, 1941  
  Task Forces were organized by Commander in Chief Atlantic Fleet (Admiral Ernest J. King) to support defense of Iceland and to escort convoys between the U.S. and Iceland. TF 1 (Rear Admiral David M. LeBreton) was based at Narragansett Bay and Boston. TF 2 (Rear Admiral Arthur B. Cook) was based at Bermuda and Hampton Roads. TF 3 (Rear Admiral Jonas H. Ingram) was based at San Juan, Puerto Rico, and Guantanamo. TF 4 (Rear Admiral Arthur L. Bristol) was based at Narragansett Bay. TF 5 (Rear Admiral Richard S. Edwards), TF 6 and TF 8 (Rear Admiral Edward D. McWhorter), TF 7 (Rear Admiral Ferdinand L. Reichmuth) were based at Bermuda. TF 9 (Rear Admiral Randall Jacobs); and TF 10 (Major General Holland M. Smith, USMC).  
   
  Patrol Wing 7 (the redesignated Patrol Wing, Support Force), under command of Captain Harold M. Mullinix, (TG 4.2) was established at Argentia, Newfoundland, for operations in North Atlantic.  
   
  Northeast Greenland Patrol, under command of Commander Edward H. "Iceberg" Smith, USCG, (TG 6.5) was organized at Boston, Massachusetts, by the U.S. Coast Guard. It consisted of the cutters USCGS Northland and USCGS North Star, and auxiliary USCGS Bear (AG-29).  
   
  Friday, July 4, 1941  
  PBY Catalinas began operations based on the seaplane tender USS Goldsborough (AVD 5), out of Reykjavik, Iceland, covering the movement of marines to Iceland.  
   
  Sunday, July 6, 1941  
  The transport USS Munargo (AP 20) and U.S. Army transport Chateau Thierry arrived at Tunugdliarfik Fjord, Greenland, to disembark men and unload equipment to establish an air base there.  
   
  Monday, July 7, 1941  
  U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt informed the U.S. Congress of the occupation of Iceland. “In accordance with the understanding so reached, forces of the United States Navy have today arrived in Iceland in order to supplement, and eventually to replace, the British forces which have until now been stationed in Iceland in order to insure the adequate defense of that country…The United States cannot permit the occupation by Germany of strategic outposts in the Atlantic to be used as air or naval bases for eventual attack against the Western Hemisphere. We have no desire to see any change in the present sovereignty of those regions. Assurance that such outposts in our defense-frontier remain in friendly hands is the very foundation of our national security and of the national security of every one of the independent nations of the New World.” Read the transcript of the speech.  
   
  U.S. Navy Task Force 19, commanded by Rear Admiral David McD. LeBreton, and consisting of six transports carrying Brigadier General John Marston's 1st Marine Brigade arrived in Reykjavik, Iceland to replace Major General Henry O. Curtis’ British 49th Division. TF 19 was composed of 2 battleships, 3 light cruisers, and 13 destroyers. The replacement of the British garrison freed those troops for combat duty elsewhere.  
   
  Tuesday, July 15, 1941  
  The U.S. Navy Operating Base Argentia in Newfoundland was officially commissioned. The base would be an important transfer station for the Allies traversing the northern Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  Wednesday, July 16, 1941  
  U.S. Navy Task Group 2.7, comprised of the light cruisers USS Philadelphia (CL 41) and USS Savannah (CL 42) and destroyers USS Meredith (DD 434) and USS Gwin (DD 433), departed Bermuda for a 3,415-mile neutrality patrol that would conclude there on July 25.  
   
  Thursday, July 17, 1941  
  A squadron of PBY Catalinas (VP 72) concluded its operations out of Reykjavik, Iceland, from the seaplane tender USS Goldsborough (AVD 5).  
   
  Saturday, July 19, 1941  
  The U. S. Atlantic Fleet formed Task Force 1 for the protection of the American forces in Iceland and support for convoys bound there.  
   
  The carrier USS Wasp (CV 7) flew a cargo of P-40 fighters to Iceland.  
   
  The U.S. Navy received instructions to provide escorts for ships of any nationality sailing to and from Iceland.  
   
  Wednesday, July 30, 1941  
  U.S. Navy Task Group 2.5, comprised of the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown (CV 5), light cruiser USS Brooklyn (CL 40), and destroyers USS Roe (DD 418), USS Grayson (DD 435), and USS Eberle (DD 430), departed Hampton Roads, Virginia, for a 3,998-mile neutrality patrol that would conclude at Bermuda on August 10.  
     
   
     
   
 

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