August 1941 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
 
  Overview  
  3 Allied and Soviet warships were sunk by U-boats.  
  3 Allied and Soviet auxiliary warships were sunk by U-boats.  
  1 Allied warships was damaged by a U-boat.  
   
  3 U-boats were sunk by Allied and Soviet warships.  
  1 U-boat was captured after being damaged by Allied aircraft.  
   
  25 Allied merchant ships were sunk by U-boats totaling 77,292 tons.  
   
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Wednesday, August 6, 1941  
  The Soviet dispatch vessel PS-70 was torpedoed and sunk by the U-652, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Georg-Werner Fraatz, off Cape Teriberka in the Arctic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 45 died and 12D survivors were picked up by Soviet motorboats.  
   
  Monday, August 11, 1941  
  The Soviet corvette Zhemchug (No 27) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-451, commanded by Eberhard Hoffmann, west of Kanin Nos in the Arctic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 61 died.  
   
  Tuesday, August 12, 1941  
  While escorting Convoy ON-4 the corvette HMS Picotee (K 63) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-568, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Joachim Preuss, southeast of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 66 died.  
   
  Tuesday, August 19, 1941  
  While proceeding behind the convoy, the Norwegian destroyer (Town) HNoMS Bath (I 17) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-204, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Walter Kell, about 400 miles southwest of Ireland in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 83 died and 41 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Hydrangea and the destroyer HMS Wanderer (D 74).  
   
  Saturday, August 23, 1941  
  While escorting Convoy OG-71 the corvette HMS Zinnia (K 98) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-564, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Reinhard Suhren, west of Portugal in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 68 died and 17 survived.  
   
  Monday, August 25, 1941  
  The Soviet minesweeping trawler T-898 (No 44) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-752, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Karl-Ernst Schroeter, about 80 miles east of Cape Chernyj in the Arctic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 41 died and 2 survived.  
   
  Tuesday, August 26, 1941  
  The auxiliary minelayer HMS Southern Prince was torpedoed and damaged by the U-652, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg-Werner Fraatz, while returning from laying minefield SN-70A in the Northern Barrage in the North Sea.  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  Sunday, August 3, 1941  
  The U-401, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Gero Zimmermann, was sunk in the North Atlantic southwest of Ireland by depth charges from the destroyer HMS Wanderer (D 74), the Norwegian destroyer HNMS St. Albans (I 15), and the corvette HMS Hydrangea (K 39). All of the ship’s complement of 45 died. During its career the U-401 sank or damaged no ships.  
   
  Sunday, August 10, 1941  
  The U-144, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Gert von Mittelstaedt, was sunk in Gulf of Finland north of Dagö by torpedoes from the Soviet submarine ShCh-307. All of the ship’s complement of 28 died. During its career the U-144 sank 1 warship.  
   
  Monday, August 25, 1941  
  The U-452, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jürgen March, was sunk in the North Sea southeast of Iceland by depth charges from the Anti-Submarine Trawler HMS Vascama (FY 185) and depth charges from a British Catalina aircraft. All of the ship’s complement of 42 died.  
   
  Wednesday, August 27, 1941  
  The U-570, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Joachim Rahmlow, was captured by Britain in the North Atlantic south of Iceland after being damaged and surrendering to a RAF Lockheed Hudson bomber. Of the ship’s complement, all 44 survived. During its career the U-570 sank or damaged no ships. The Royal Navy thoroughly evaluated the submarine, the first to be captured intact for intensive study; the U-boat served as HMS Graph until it was wrecked in 1944.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Monday, August 4, 1941  
  The British schooner Robert Max was sunk by gunfire by the U-126, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Bauer, near the Azores in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 7 survived and reached land by lifeboat. The 172 ton Robert Max was carrying codfish and was headed for Oporto, Portugal.  
   
  Tuesday, August 5, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy SL-81, the: British steam merchant Belgravian was torpedoed and sunk by the U-372, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz-Joachim Neumann, west of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 47 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Bluebell (K 80). The 3,136 ton Belgravian was carrying kernels, groundnuts, and tin ore and was headed for Hull, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-81, the: British steam merchant Swiftpool was torpedoed and sunk by the U-372 west of Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, 42 died and 2 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Bluebell (K 80). The 5,205 ton Swiftpool was carrying iron ore and was headed for Middlesbrough, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-81, the British steam merchant Kumasian was torpedoed and sunk by the U-74 west of Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 59 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS La Malouine (K 46). The 4,922 ton Kumasian was carrying general cargo and was headed for London, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-81, the British steam merchant Cape Rodney was torpedoed and sunk by the U-75, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmuth Ringelmann, west of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 39 survived and were picked up by the corvettes HMS Hydrangea (K 39) and HMS Zinnia (K 98). The 4,922 ton Cape Rodney was carrying palm kernels, groundnuts, and manganese ore and was headed for London, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-81, the British steam merchant Harlingen was torpedoed and sunk by the U-75 west of Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 39 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Hydrangea (K 39). The 4,922 ton Harlingen was carrying West African produce and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Saturday, August 9, 1941  
  The British steam trawler Ocean Victor was torpedoed and sunk by the U-206, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Herbert Opitz, southeast of Iceland. All of the ship’s complement of 13 died. The 202 ton Ocean Victor was trawling for fish.  
   
  Thursday, August 14, 1941  
  A straggler from Convoy HG-70, the Yugoslavian Steam merchant Sud was attacked by two submarines west of Portugal in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. First the Sud was shelled by the Italian submarine Marconi. Finally the Sud was shelled and then torpedoed and sunk by the U-126, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Bauer. Of the ship’s complement, all 33 survived and were picked up by the Portuguese steam merchant Alferrarede. The 2,589 ton Sud was carrying ballast and was headed for Halifax, Canada.  
   
  Monday, August 18, 1941  
  The unescorted Panamanian steam merchant Longtaker was torpedoed and sunk by the U-38, commanded by Heinrich Schuch, southwest of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 24 died and 3 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS Lansdale (DD 426). The 1,700 ton Longtaker was carrying timber and food stuffs and was headed for Reykjavik, Iceland.  
   
  Tuesday, August 19, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy OG-71, the British steam passenger ship Aguila was torpedoed and sunk by the U-201, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Adalbert Schnee, west-southwest of Ireland in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 152 died and 16 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Wallflower (K 44). The 3,255 ton Aguila was carrying passengers, general cargo, and mail and was headed for Lisbon, Portugal. Among the passengers on board the Aguila were 22 women from the WRNS (Womens Royal Navy Service, commonly called Wrens) who had volunteered for cipher and wireless duties in Gibraltar. None of the Wrens survived the sinking.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OG-71, the British steam merchant Ciscar was torpedoed and sunk by the U-201 west-southwest of Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, 13 died and 35 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Petrel. The 1,809 ton Ciscar was carrying general cargo and government stores and was headed for Gibraltar.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OG-71, the British steam merchant Alva was torpedoed and sunk by the U-559, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans Heidtmann, west-southwest of Ireland in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 24 survived. The 1,584 ton Alva was carrying coal and was headed for Lisbon, Portugal.  
   
  Friday, August 22, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy OG-71, the Irish steam merchant Clonlara was torpedoed and sunk by the U-564, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Reinhard Suhren, west of Aveiro, Portugal in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 19 died and 13 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Campion (K 108). The 1,203 ton Clonlara was carrying coal and was headed for Lisbon, Portugal.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OG-71, the 484 ton British steam tug Empire Oak was torpedoed and sunk by the U-564 west of Aveiro, Portugal. Of the ship’s complement, 19 died and 19 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Campanula (K 18).  
   
  Saturday, August 23, 1941  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OG-71, the British steam merchant Aldergrove was torpedoed and sunk by the U-201, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Adalbert Schnee, northwest of Lisbon, Portugal in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 38 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Campanula (K 18). The 1,974 ton Aldergrove was carrying patent fuel and was headed for Lisbon.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OG-71, the British motor merchant Stork was torpedoed and sunk by the U-201 northwest of Lisbon. Of the ship’s complement, 19 died and 3 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Campion (K 108). The 787 ton Stork was carrying cased aviation fuel and was headed for Gibraltar.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OG-71, the Norwegian Steam merchant Spind was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Erich Topp, west of Portugal in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 25 survived and were picked up by the destroyer HMS Boreas (H 77). The 2,129 ton Spind was carrying coal, coke and engine parts and was headed for Lisbon, Portugal.  
   
  Wednesday, August 27, 1941  
  The 230 ton British steam trawler Ladylove was torpedoed and sunk by the U-202, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Heinz Linder, near Iceland. All of the ship’s complement of 14 died.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OS-4, the British steam merchant Embassage was torpedoed and sunk by the U-557, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Ottokar Arnold Paulssen, approximately 100 miles west of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 39 died and 3 survivors were picked up by the Canadian destroyer HMCS Assiniboine (D 18). The 4,954 ton Embassage was carrying general cargo, including trucks and aircraft and was headed for Pepel, Sierra Leone.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OS-4, the British steam merchant Saugor was torpedoed and sunk by the U-557, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Ottokar Arnold Paulssen, approximately100 miles west of Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, 59 died and 23 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Perth. The 6,303 ton Saugor was carrying general cargo and 28 aircraft and was headed for Calcutta, India.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OS-4, the British steam merchant Tremoda was torpedoed and sunk by the U-557 approximately100 miles west of Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, 32 died and 21 survivors were picked up by the French minesweeper FFL Chevreuil. The 4,736 ton Tremoda was carrying general cargo and war stores and was headed for Duala, Cameroons.  
   
Sailing with Convoy OS-4, the Norwegian motor merchant Segundo was torpedoed and sunk by the U-557approximately100 miles west of Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 27 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Lulworth (Y 60). The 4,414 ton Segundo was carrying ballast and was headed for Curaçao.
  Thursday, August 28, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy OS-4, the British motor merchant Otaio was torpedoed and sunk by the U-558, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Krech, about 330 miles northwest of Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, 13 died and 58 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Vanoc (H 33). The 10,298 ton Otaio was carrying General cargo, including stores and mail and was headed for Sydney, Australia.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  Wednesday, August 6, 1941  
  U.S. Navy Task Force 16, under command of Rear Admiral William R. Monroe, formed around the aircraft carrier USS Wasp (CV 7), battleship USS Mississippi (BB 41), heavy cruisers USS Quincy (CA 39) and USS Wichita (CA 45), and five destroyers, delivered U.S. Army troops, transported in the transport USS American Legion (AP 35), stores ship USS Mizar (AF 120), and cargo ship USS Almaack (AK 27) to Reykjavik, Iceland. The USS Wasp flew off USAAF P-40 Warhawks and PT-13 Stearman biplanes from the 33rd Pursuit Squadron to Iceland to provide cover for the soldiers' arrival.  
   
  Friday, August 15, 1941  
  U.S. Navy Task Group 2.5, comprised of the carrier USS Yorktown (CV 5), light cruiser USS Brooklyn (CL 40) and destroyers USS Roe (DD-418), USS Grayson (DD 435), and USS Eberle (DD 430), departed Bermuda to begin a 4,064-mile neutrality patrol that would conclude at Bermuda on August 27.  
   
  Saturday, August 23, 1941  
  The German merchant cruiser Orion returned from its cruise and arrived in the Gironde Estuary, France. The cruise began from Kiel on March 30, 1940. On her 511-day voyage she sunk or captured 17 ships (85,779 gross tons) singly or in company with the raider Komet.  
   
  Monday, August 25, 1941  
  U.S. Navy Task Group 2.6, under command of Rear Admiral H. Kent Hewitt, and comprised of the USS Wasp (CV 7), light cruiser USS Savannah (CL 42), and destroyers USS Meredith (DD 434) and USS Gwin (DD 433), departed Hampton Roads, Virginia, on a neutrality patrol that would conclude at Bermuda on September 10.  
   
  Thursday, August 28, 1941  
  The Inter-American Financial and Economic Advisory Committee adopted and made effective a plan to use foreign merchant vessels in American ports.  
   
  U.S. Navy Task Group 2.7, comprised of the aircraft escort vessel USS Long Island (AVG 1), light cruiser USS Nashville (CL 43) and destroyers USS Livermore (DD 429) and USS Kearny (DD 432) departed Bermuda. It will concluded the patrol, the first involving the prototype "escort carrier," at Bermuda on September 9.  
     
   
     
   
 

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