September 1941 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
  Overview  
  1 Allied warship was sunk by a U-boat.  
  1 Allied auxiliary warship was sunk by a U-boat.  
   
  2 U-boats were sunk by Allied warships.  
   
  55 Allied or neutral merchant ships were sunk by U-boats totaling 205,304 tons.  
  2 Allied merchant ships were damaged by U-boats totaling 8,723 tons.  
   
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
Thursday, September 4, 1941
  While en route to Iceland with mail for the Marines stationed there the destroyer USS Greer (DD 145), commanded by Commander J.J. Mahoney, was notified by a British plane that a U-Boat (the U-652 commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Georg-Werner Fraatz) had been spotted in the vicinity. The USS Greer began to track the U-652 which then fired torpedoes at the USS Greer. The USS Greer dropped depth charges in response. Neither vessel was damaged. The USS Greer became the first United States warship fired upon by a German U-boat in the war and the incident was used two days later on September 6, 1941 by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt in his “Shoot on sight” order to the Atlantic Fleet.  
   
  Friday, September 12, 1941  
  The U.S. Coast Guard cutter Northland assisted by the U.S. Coast Guard cutter North Star seized the the Norwegian trawler Buskoe in MacKenzie Bay, Greenland. The capture of the Buskoe thwarted its mission of establishing and servicing German radio weather stations in that region and was the first capture of a belligerent ship by U.S. naval forces in the war.  
   
  Sunday, September 14, 1941  
  As U.S. Navy Task Force 15 proceeded toward Iceland, the destroyer USS Truxtun (DD 229) reported a submarine emerging from the fog 300 yards away, but low visibility and uncertainty as to the position of the destroyer USS MacLeish (DD 220), also in the screen of TF 15, prevented the USS Truxtun from opening fire. After the submarine submerged, the USS Truxtun, USS MacLeish and USS Sampson (DD 394) made depth charge attacks with no verifiable results.  
   
  Friday, September 19, 1941  
  While escorting Convoy SC-44 the Canadian corvette HMCS Levis (K 115) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-74, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Eitel-Friedrich Kentrat, about 120 miles east of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 18 died and 40 survivors were picked up by the Canadian corvettes HMCS Mayflower (K 191) and HMCS Agassiz (K 129).  
   
  Saturday, September 27, 1941  
  While escorting Convoy HG-73, the fighter catapult ship HMS Springbank was torpedoed and sunk by the U-201, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Adalbert Schnee, north-northeast of the Azores in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 32 died and 201 survivors were picked up by the corvettes HMS Jasmine (K 23), HMS Hibiscus (K 24), and HMS Periwinkle (K 55).  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  Wednesday, September 10, 1941  
  The U-501, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hugo Förster, was sunk in the Straits of Denmark south of Angmagsalik, Greenland by depth charges and ramming from the Canadian corvettes HMCS Chambly (K 116) and HMCS Moosejaw( K 164). Of the ship’s complement, 11 died and 37 survived. During its career the U-501 sank 1 ship or a total of 2,000 tons.  
   
  Thursday, September 11, 1941  
  The U-207, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Fritz Meyer, was sunk in the Straits of Denmark southeast of Angmassalik, Greenland by depth charges from the destroyers HMS Leamington (G 19) and HMS Veteran (D 72). All of the ship’s complement of 41 died. During its career the U-207 sank 2 ships for a total of 9,727 tons.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Wednesday, September 3, 1941  
  The unescorted British motor merchant Fort Richepanse was torpedoed and sunk by the U-567, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Theodor Fahr, about 450 miles southwest of Bloody Foreland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 41 died and 22 survivors were picked up by the Polish destroyers ORP Garland (H 37) and ORP Piorun (G 65). The 3,485 ton Fort Richepanse was carrying general cargo, including eggs and mail and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Friday, September 5, 1941  
  A straggler from Convoy SC-41, the Norwegian steam merchant Einvik was torpedoed and then sunk by gunfire by the U-501, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hugo Förster, about 450 miles southwest of Iceland. Of the ship’s complement, all 23 survived. The 2,000 ton Einvik was headed for Cardiff, Wales.  
   
  The 190 ton Icelandic steam fishing trawler Jarlinn was torpedoed and sunk by the U-141, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Philipp Schüler, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 11 died.  
   
  Saturday, September 6, 1941  
  The unescorted Panamanian motor merchant Trinidad was sunk by gunfire by the U-95, commanded by Gerd Schreiber, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 10 survived. The 434 ton Trinidad was carrying port and cork and was headed for Dublin, Ireland.  
   
  The 228 ton British steam fishing trawler Jarlinn was torpedoed and sunk by the U-141, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Philipp Schüler, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 15 died.  
   
  Tuesday, September 9, 1941  
  A straggler from Convoy SC-42, the British steam merchant Empire Springbuck was torpedoed and sunk by the U-81, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Friedrich Guggenberger, northeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 42 died. The 5,591 ton Empire Springbuck was carrying steel and explosives and was headed for London, England.  
   
  Wednesday, September 10, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy SC-42, the British steam merchant Muneric was torpedoed and sunk by the U-432, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Heinz-Otto Schultze, south of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 63 died. The 5,229 ton Muneric was carrying iron ore and was headed for Middlesbrough, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-42, the Norwegian steam merchant Stargard was torpedoed and sunk by the U-432 south of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 15 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian steam merchant Regin and a corvette. The 1,113 ton Stargard was carrying lumber and was headed for London, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-42, the Dutch steam merchant Winterswijk was torpedoed and sunk by the U-432 south of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, 20 died and 13 survivors were picked up by a corvette. The 3,205 ton Winterswijk was carrying phosphates and was headed for Methil, Scotland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-42, the British motor merchant Sally Mærsk was torpedoed and sunk by the U-81, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Friedrich Guggenberger, east-northeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 34 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMCS Kenogami (K 125). The 3,252 ton Sally Mærsk was carrying wheat and was headed for Sharpness, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-42, the British catapult armed merchant Empire Hudson was torpedoed and sunk by the U-82, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Siegfried Rollmann, northeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 63 survivors were picked up by the British merchant Baron Ramsay and the Norwegian merchant Regin. The 7,465 ton Empire Hudson was carrying wheat and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-42, the British steam merchant Thistleglen was torpedoed and sunk by the U-85, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Eberhard Greger, northeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 46 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Lorient. The 4,748 ton Thistleglen was carrying pig iron and steel and was headed for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  The unescorted Dutch motor merchant Marken was torpedoed and sunk by the U-111, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wilhelm Kleinschmidt, north of Ceara, Brazil in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 37 survived and were picked up by a Spanish steam merchant. The 5,719 ton Marken was carrying aircraft and was headed for Calcutta, India.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-42, the British steam tanker Tahchee was torpedoed and damaged by the U-652, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Georg-Werner Fraatz, northeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The 6,508 ton Tahchee was carrying fuel and diesel oil and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Thursday, September 11, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy SC-42, the British steam merchant Berury was torpedoed and sunk by the U-207, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Fritz Meyer, east of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 41 survivors were picked up by the corvettes HMCS Kenogami (K 125) and HMCS Moosejaw (K 164). The 4,924 ton Berury was carrying general cargo, including army stores and was headed for Belfast, Ireland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-42, the British steam merchant Stonepool was torpedoed and sunk by the U-207 east of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, 42 died and 7 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMCS Kenogami (K 125). The 4,803 ton Stonepool was carrying grain, oats and trucks and was headed for Avonmouth, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-42, the Swedish steam merchant Garm was torpedoed and sunk by the U-432, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Heinz-Otto Schultze, east of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 14 survived. The 1,231 ton Garm was carrying lumber and was headed for Kings Lynn, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-42, the British motor tanker Bulysses was torpedoed and sunk by the U-82, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Siegfried Rollmann, south of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 60 survivors were picked up by the Finnish steam merchant Wisla. The 7,519 ton Bulysses was carrying gas oil and was headed for Stanlow, England.  
   
Sailing with Convoy SC-42, the British steam merchant Empire Crossbill was torpedoed and sunk by the U-82 south of Cape Farewell. All of the ship’s complement of 49 died. The 5,463 ton Empire Crossbill was carrying steel and relief goods and was headed for Hull, England.
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-42, the British steam merchant Gypsum Queen was torpedoed and sunk by the U-82 south of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, 10 died and 26 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian steam merchant Vestland. The 3,915 ton Gypsum Queen was carrying sulfur and was headed for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SC-42, the Swedish steam merchant Scania was torpedoed and sunk by the U-202, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Heinz Linder, east of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 24 survived. The 1,999 ton Scania was carrying lumber and was headed for Hull, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SC-42, the Norwegian steam merchant Bestum was torpedoed and damaged by the U-433, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans Ey, east of Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  The unescorted Panamanian steam merchant Montana was torpedoed and sunk by the U-105, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg Schewe, approximately 400 miles northeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 18 died and 7 survived. The 1,549 ton Montana was carrying timber and was bound for Reykjavik, Iceland.  
   
  Monday, September 15, 1941  
  A straggler from Convoy ON-14, the British steam merchant Empire Eland was torpedoed and sunk by the U-94, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Otto Ites, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 38 died. The 5,613 ton Empire Eland was carrying ballast and was headed for Tampa, Florida.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ON-14, the British steam merchant Newbury was torpedoed and sunk by the U-94 southeast of Cape Farewell. All of the ship’s complement of 45 died. The 5,102 ton Newbury was carrying coal and was headed for Buenos Aires, Argentina.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ON-14, the Greek steam merchant Pegasus was torpedoed and sunk by the U-94 southeast of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, 16 died and 13 survivors were picked up by a Swedish ship. The 5,762 ton Pegasus was carrying general cargo and military stores and a motor launch on deck and was headed for Haifa, Palestine.  
   
  Tuesday, September 16, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy SC-42, the British motor merchant Jedmoor was torpedoed and sunk by the U-98, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Robert Gysae, northwest of St. Kilda, Scotland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 31 died and 5 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian merchant Knoll and the British merchant Campus. The 4,392 ton Jedmoor was carrying iron ore and was headed for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  Friday, September 19, 1941  
  A straggler from Convoy SC-42, the British steam merchant Baron Pentland was torpedoed and sunk by the U-372, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz-Joachim Neumann, east of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 39 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMCS Orillia (K 119). The 3,410 ton Baron Pentland K was carrying timber and was headed for Hartlepool, England.  
   
  Saturday, September 20, 1941  
  The unescorted British motor merchant Cingalese Prince was torpedoed and sunk by the U-111, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wilhelm Kleinschmidt, east-southeast of St. Paul Rocks in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 57 died and 20 survivors were picked up by the British sloops HMS Weston (L 72) and HMS Londonderry (L 76). The 8,474 ton Cingalese Prince was carrying general cargo, including manganese ore and pig iron and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OG-74, the British steam merchant Baltallinn was torpedoed and sunk by the U-124, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Johann Mohr, north-northeast of the Azores in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 28 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Walmer Castle. The 1,303 ton Baltallinn was carrying government stores and was headed for Gibraltar.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OG-74, the British steam merchant Empire Moat was torpedoed and sunk by the U-124 north-northeast of the Azores. Of the ship’s complement, all 32 survived and were picked up by the British rescue ship Walmer Castle, the corvette HMS Marigold (K 87) and the sloop HMS Deptford (L 53). The 2,922 ton Empire Moat was carrying ballast and was headed for Gibraltar.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-44, the Norwegian motor tanker Barbro was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erich Topp, east of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 34 died. The 6,325 ton Barbro was carrying petrol and was headed for Stanlow, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-44, the Panamanian steam merchant Pink Star was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552 east of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, 13 died and 22 survived. The 4,150 ton Pink Star was carrying general cargo and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-44, the British steam tanker T.J. Williams was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552 east of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, 17 died and 22 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Honeysuckle (K 27). The 8,212 ton T.J. Williams was carrying motor fuel and was headed for Stanlow, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-44, the British catapult armed merchant Empire Burton was torpedoed and sunk by the U-74, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Eitel-Friedrich Kentrat, east of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 58 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Honeysuckle (K 27). The 6,966 ton Empire Burton was carrying wheat and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sunday, September 21, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy OG-74, the British steam merchant Lissa was torpedoed and sunk by the U-201, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Adalbert Schnee, north-northeast of the Azores in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 26 died. The 1,511 ton Lissa was carrying coal and was headed for Lisbon, Portugal.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OG-74, the British steam merchant Rhineland was torpedoed and sunk by the U-201 north-northeast of the Azores. All of the ship’s complement of 26 died. The 1,381 ton Rhineland was carrying coal and bags of mail and was headed for Gibraltar.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OG-74, the British steam merchant Runa was torpedoed and sunk by the U-201 north-northeast of the Azores. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and 9 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Deptford (L 53). The 1,575 ton Runa was carrying coal and was headed for Lisbon, Portugal.  
   
  Monday, September 22, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy SL-87, the British motor merchant Edward Blyden was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Winter, southwest of the Canary Islands in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 63 survived and were picked up by the sloop HMS Bideford (L 43). The 5,003 ton Edward Blyden was carrying general cargo and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-87, the British steam merchant Niceto de Larrinaga was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103 southwest of the Canary Islands. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 53 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Gardenia (K 99) and the sloop HMS Lulworth (Y 60). The 5,591 ton Niceto de Larrinaga was carrying palm kernels, manganese ore, groundnuts, and general cargo and was headed for London, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ON-16, the British steam merchant Erna III was torpedoed and sunk by the U-562, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Horst Hamm, northeast of Cape Farewell in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 23 died. The 1,590 ton Erna III was carrying ballast and was headed for Montreal, Canada.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-87, the British motor merchant Silverbelle was torpedoed and sunk by the U-68, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Karl-Friedrich Merten, southwest of the Canary Islands in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 60 survived and were picked up by a French escort. The 5,302 ton Silverbelle was carrying phosphate and general cargo, including palm oil, copper and cocoa beans and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Wednesday, September 24, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy SL-87, the British motor merchant Dixcove was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Günter Hessler, southwest of Madeira in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 51 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian steam merchant Fana. The 3,790 ton Dixcove was carrying West African produce and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-87, the British steam merchant John Holt was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107 southwest of Madeira. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 68 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Gorleston (Y 92). The 4,975 ton John Holt was carrying West African produce and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-87, the British steam merchant Lafian was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107 southwest of Madeira. Of the ship’s complement, all 47 survived and were picked up by the sloop HMS Gorleston (Y 92). The 4,876 ton Lafian was carrying palm kernels, timber, palm oil, and bullion and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-87, the British steam merchant St. Clair II was torpedoed and sunk by the U-67, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Müller-Stöckheim, west-northwest of the Canary Islands in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 13 died and 31 survivors were picked up by the sloops HMS Gorleston (Y 92) and HMS Lulworth (Y 60). The 3,753 ton St. Clair II was carrying palm kernels, palm oil, and sundries and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Thursday, September 25, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy HG-73, the British steam merchant Empire Stream was torpedoed and sunk by the U-124, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Johann Mohr, north-northeast of the Azores in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 27 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Begonia (K 66). The 2,922 ton Empire Stream was carrying potash and was headed for Dundee, Scotland.  
   
  Friday, September 26, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy HG-73, the British steam merchant Cortes was torpedoed and sunk by the U-124, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Johann Mohr, north-northeast of the Azores in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 43 died. The 1,374 ton Cortes was carrying general cargo, including potash and cork and was headed for London, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HG-73, the British steam merchant Petrel was torpedoed and sunk by the U-124 north-northeast of the Azores. Of the ship’s complement, 22 died and 9 survived. The 1,354 ton Petrel was carrying general cargo and cork and was headed for Bristol, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HG-73, the Norwegian steam merchant Siremalm was torpedoed and sunk by the U-124 north-northeast of the Azores. All of the ship’s complement of 27 died. The 2,468 ton Siremalm was carrying iron ore and was headed for Barrow, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HG-73, the British steam passenger ship Avoceta was torpedoed and sunk by the U-203, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Rolf Mützelburg, north of the Azores in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 123 died and 43 survived. The 3,442 ton Avoceta was carrying passengers, general cargo, and mail and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HG-73, the British steam merchant Lapwing was torpedoed and sunk by the U-203 north of the Azores. Of the ship’s complement, 243 died and 10 survived. The 1,348 ton Lapwing was carrying cork and pyrites and was headed for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HG-73, the British steam merchant Norwegian Varangberg was torpedoed and sunk by the U-203 north of the Azores. Of the ship’s complement, 21 died and 6 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Jasmine (K 23). The 2,842 ton Varangberg was carrying iron ore and was headed for Cardiff, Wales.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed Panamanian steam tanker I.C. White was torpedoed and sunk by the U-66, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Richard Zapp, off the coast of South America in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 34 survivors were picked up by the American steam merchants Delnorte and West Nilus. The 7,052 ton I.C. White was carrying crude oil and was headed for Capetown, South Africa.  
   
  Saturday, September 27, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy HG-73, the British steam merchant Cervantes was torpedoed and sunk by the U-201, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Adalbert Schnee, north-northeast of the Azores in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 32 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Starling. The 1,810 ton Cervantes was carrying potash and cork and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HG-73, the British steam merchant Margareta was torpedoed and sunk by the U-201 north-northeast of the Azores. Of the ship’s complement, all 34 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMS Hibiscus (K 24). The 3,103 ton Margareta was carrying general, including scrap and cork and was headed for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  Monday, September 1, 1941  
  The U.S. Navy assumed the responsibility of transatlantic convoys from Argentia, Newfoundland to the meridian of Iceland. Admiral Ernest J. King, Commander in Chief Atlantic Fleet, announced the formation of a Denmark Strait Patrol. Two heavy cruisers and four destroyers were allocated to this force. The U.S. Navy was now permitted to escort convoys in the Atlantic that contained American merchant vessels.  
   
  Thursday, September 11, 1941  
  U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt announced a shoot on sight order to U.S. Navy in American defense waters stating “It is clear to all Americans that the time has come when the Americas themselves must now be defended. A continuation of attacks in our own waters, or in waters which could be used for further and greater attacks on us, will inevitably weaken American ability to repel Hitlerism...” This action was made in response because of the incidents of the Panaman, and the Sessca on August 17, the USS Greer on September 4, and the Steel Seafarer on September 6, 1941.  
   
  Thursday, September 18, 1941  
  U.S. Navy ships escorted an east bound British transatlantic convoy for the first time. TU 4.1.1, commanded by Captain Morton L. Deyo, and comprised of the destroyers USS Ericsson (DD 440), USS Eberle (DD 430), USS Ellis (DD 154), USS Dallas (DD 199), and USS Upshur (DD 144) assumed the ocean escort duties for Convoy HX-150, at a point 150 miles south of Newfoundland.  
   
  Friday, September 19, 1941  
  U.S. Secretary of State Cordell Hull sent a note to German Chargé d'Affaires Hans Thomsen concerning the settlement of the destroyer USS Robin Moor incident, citing reparations to the amount of $2,967,092.00. The German Embassy acknowledged receipt of the note the same day.  
   
  Saturday, September 20, 1941  
  A U.S. Army shore battery fired across the bow of the destroyer USS Charles F. Hughes (DD 428) as U.S. Navy Task Unit 4.1.2, under command of Commander Fred D. Kirtland, entered Hvalfjordur, Iceland in foggy weather conditions.  
   
  Tuesday, September 23, 1941  
  U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt announced the possibility of arming American merchant vessels against German attacks.  
   
  Thursday, September 25, 1941  
  U.S. Navy Task Unit 4.1.1, commanded by Captain Morton L. Deyo, which was escorting convoy HX 150 turned over the screening duties to British escort vessels at the Mid-Ocean Meeting Point (MOMP). TU 4.1.1 had been escorting convoy HX 150 since September 18. All the vessels in the convoy reached their destinations safely. This was the first time. that U.S. Navy ships escorted an east bound British transatlantic convoy.  
   
  Friday, September 26, 1941  
  The U.S. Navy ordered the protection of all ships engaged in commerce in U.S. defensive waters - by patrolling, covering, escorting, and by reporting or destroying German and Italian naval forces encountered.  
   
  German Chargé d'Affaires Hans Thomsen replied to U.S. Secretary of State Hull's note of September 19 concerning reparations for the loss of the destroyer USS Robin Moor. Referring to the notes of June 20 and September 19, Thomsen replied that "the two communications made are not such as to lead to an appropriate reply by my government."  
   
  Saturday, September 27, 1941  
  The First Maritime Commission EC-2 type freighter (Liberty Ship) SS Henry Patrick was launched along with 13 sister ships during a Presidential launching ceremony in Baltimore, Maryland. These 14 vessels were the first of 2,742 Liberty ships, a class of cheap and quick-to-build mass produced cargo haulers that helped fulfill the need for merchant vessels in a wartime economy and to carry the industrial output of wartime America to the battlefields of Europe and the Pacific.  
   
  Tuesday, September 30, 1941  
  U.S. Navy Task Unit 4.1.5, under command of Commander William K. Phillips, assumed escort duty for convoy HX 152. During the rough passage to the Mid-Ocean Meeting Point, which concluded on October 9, all the destroyers of the unit, USS Mayo (DD-422) (flagship), USS Broome (DD-210), USS Babbitt (DD-128), USS Leary (DD-158) and USS Schenck (DD-159) suffered varying degrees of storm damage.  
   
  U.S. Navy Task Unit 4.1.3, under command of of Commander Dennis L. Ryan, assumed escort duty for convoy ON 20 at the Mid-Ocean Meeting Point.  
     
   
     
   
 

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