October 1941 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
  Overview  
  4 Allied warships were sunk by U-boats.  
  1 Allied auxiliary warship was sunk by a U-boat.  
  2 Allied auxiliary warships were damaged by U-boats  
   
  1 American warship was sunk by a U-boat.  
  1 American warship was damaged by a U-boat.  
  1 American auxiliary warship was damaged by a U-boat.  
   
  2 U-boats were sunk by Allied warships.  
   
  33 Allied or neutral merchant ships were sunk by U-boats totaling 158,846 tons.  
  1 Allied merchant ship was damaged by a U-boat totaling 14,795 tons.  
   
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Tuesday, October 14, 1941  
  While escorting Convoy OG-75, the corvette HMS Fleur de Lys (K 122) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-206, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Opitz, approximately 55 miles west of Gibraltar in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement there were 3 survivors.  
   
  The submarine U-553 encountered convoy SC 48 and summoned help which would arrive to see action from October 15 through 18.  
   
  Thursday, October 16, 1941  
  The battle to protect Convoy SC 48 continued. German submarines U-502 and U-568 reestablished contact before retiring upon the arrival of U.S. Navy Task Unit 4.1.4, under command of Captain Hewlett Thebaud. The destroyer USS Livermore (DD 429) swept ahead of the convoy and depth-charged the U-553. The destroyer USS Kearny (DD 432), sweeping astern, dropped charges to discourage tracking submarines. Later, the U-502 and U-568, augmented by the U-432, U-553, and U-558 renewed the attack upon SC-48. The U-boats commenced a determined assault on SC-48 during the night of October 16-17.  
   
  The destroyer USS Charles F. Hughes (DD 428), while escorting Convoy HX-154, rescued the only seven survivors of British freighter Hatasu (torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U-431 on October 2, 600 miles east of Cape Race, Newfoundland in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  Friday, October 17, 1941  
  The battle to protect convoy SC-48 continued. Convoy SC-48 was the first U.S. Navy-escorted convoy to engage German submarines in battle. Despite the presence of the three modern U.S. destroyers and two flush-deckers - USS Decatur (DD 341) and HMCS Columbia, and four Canadian corvettes, the Germans torpedoed six ships and an escort vessel in a total elapsed time of four hours and forty-seven minutes.  
   
  The destroyer USS Kearny (DD 432), while part of the Task Unit 4.1.4, which was detached from convoy ON-24 to reinforce the escort of convoy SC-48 which was under attack by U-boats southwest of Iceland,  was torpedoed and damaged by the U-568, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Joachim Preuss, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The explosion killed 11 men and wounded 22 others, eight of them seriously. Escorted by the destroyer USS Greer (DD 145), the damaged USS Kearny proceeded to Hvalfjordur, Iceland. There she would undergo repairs alongside the repair ship USS Vulcan (AR 5) and eventually return to the United States. The men of the USS Kearney were the first American military casualties of the war.  
   
  While escorting Convoy SC-48 the corvette HMS Gladiolus (K 34) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-553, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Karl Thurmann, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 65 died.  
   
  Iceland-based U.S. Navy PBYs arrived to provide air coverage for SC 48.  
   
  The destroyers USS Charles F. Hughes (DD 428) and USS Gleaves (DD 423), while screening convoy HX 154 in the northern Atlantic Ocean, depth-charged suspicious contacts.  
   
  Saturday, October 18, 1941  
  The battle to protect Convoy SC-48 continued. While escorting Convoy SC-48, the destroyer HMS Broadwater (H 81) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-101, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Mengersen, south of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 56 died and 85 survivors were picked up by the antisubmarine trawlers HMS Angle (FY 201) and HMS Cape Warwick (FY 167).  
   
  The destroyers USS Plunkett (DD 431), USS Livermore (DD 429) and USS Decatur (DD 341) made a concerted depth charge attacks on sound contacts with no visible results. German submarines broke off operations against Convoy SC-48.  
   
  A U.S. Navy PBY Catalina dropped a package containing blood plasma and transfusion gear for use in treating the wounded on board the destroyer USS Kearny (DD-432). The destroyer USS Monssen (DD 435) retrieved the package but the gear becomes disengaged and sank. A Martin PBM Mariner repeated the operation a few hours later. This time the drop was successful and the USS Monssen retrieved the medical supplies intact.  
   
  Sunday, October 19, 1941  
  The destroyers USS Charles F. Hughes (DD 428) and USS Gleaves (DD 423), while screening Convoy HX-154, depth-charged suspicious contacts in the northern Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  Monday, October 20, 1941  
  U.S. Navy PBY Catalinas provided air coverage for convoy Convoy ON-26.  
   
  Tuesday, October 21, 1941  
  A straggler from Convoy SL-89, the 13,984 ton armed merchant cruiser HMS Aurania (F 28) was torpedoed and damaged by the U-123, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Reinhard Hardegen, west of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died.  
   
  Wednesday, October 22, 1941  
  The British fleet oiler Darkdale was torpedoed and sunk by the U-68, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Karl-Friedrich Merten, while anchored in Jamestown harbor, St. Helena in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 41 died and 8 survivors were picked up by harbor craft. The 8,145 ton Darkdale was carrying fuel oil, aviation gasoline, diesel oil, and lubricating oil.  
   
  Friday, October 24, 1941  
While escorting Convoy HG-75, the destroyer HMS Cossack (G 03) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-563, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Klaus Bargsten, west of Gibraltar in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 159 died and 60 survivors were picked up by the armed merchant cruiser HMS Legion (F 74) and corvette HMS Carnation (K 00).
   
  Saturday, October 25, 1941  
  U.S. Navy Task Force 14, under command of Rear Admiral H. Kent Hewitt, formed around the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown (CV 5), battleship USS New Mexico (BB 40), light cruisers USS Savannah (CL 42) and USS Philadelphia (CL 41), and nine destroyers, departed Portland, Maine, to escort a convoy ("Cargo") of British merchantmen.  
   
  U.S. Navy Task Unit 4.1.3, under command of Commander Richard E. Webb, escorted convoy HX 156. The destroyer USS Hilary P. Jones (DD 427) carried out depth charge attacks on a suspicious contact but after spying a school of porpoises ceased fire.  
   
  Sunday, October 26, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy HG-75, the British fighter catapult ship HMS Ariguani (F 105) was torpedoed and damaged by the U-83, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Werner Kraus, west of Portugal in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died.  
   
  Monday, October 27, 1941  
  U.S. Navy Task Unit 4.1.6, under command of Commander George W. Johnson, screened Convoy ON-28. During the day, the destroyers USS DuPont (DD 152) and USS Sampson (DD 394) each carried out two depth charge attacks against suspected U-boat contacts.  
   
  The destroyer USS Hilary P. Jones (DD 427) was damaged by heavy seas while screening Convoy HX-156.  
   
  Wednesday, October 29, 1941  
  U.S. Navy Task Unit 4.1.3, under command of Commander Richard E. Webb, escorted Convoy HX-156. The destroyer USS Hilary P. Jones (DD 427) carried out a depth charge attack on suspicious contact.  
   
  U.S. Navy Task Unit 4.1.6, under command of Commander George W. Johnson, screened Convoy ON-28. During the day, the destroyers USS Lea (DD-118), DuPont (DD-152), USS MacLeish (DD-220), and USS Sampson (DD-394) depth charged suspected U-boat contacts.  
   
  Thursday, October 30, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy ON-28, the American Fleet oiler USS Salinas (AO 19) was torpedoed and damaged by the U-106, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hermann Rasch, approximately 700 miles east of Newfoundland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The destroyer USS Lea (DD 118) escorted the USS Salinas which would reach port under her own power. The two ships would be joined en route by the U.S. Coast Guard cutter USCG Campbell and tug USS Cherokee (AT-66).  
   
  U.S. Navy Task Unit 4.1.6, under command of Commander George W. Johnson, screening Convoy ON-28, attacked sound contacts. The destroyer USS Bernadou (DD 153) carried out five depth charge attacks and fired at what was most likely the U-67, forcing her to submerge. The USS destroyer DuPont (DD 152) carried out three depth charge attacks and the destroyers USS MacLeish (DD 220) and USS Sampson (DD 394) carried out one apiece.  
   
  U.S. Navy Task Unit 4.1.1, under command of Captain Marion Y. Cohen, contacted the Mid-Ocean Meeting Point-bound Convoy HX-157 in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The convoy would not be attacked by U-boats.  
   
  Friday, October 31, 1941  
  While escorting the 42-ship Convoy HX-156, the destroyer USS Reuben James (DD 245) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erich Topp, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 115 died and 45 survivors were picked up by the destroyers USS Niblack (DD 424) and USS Hilary P. Jones (DD 427). The USS Reuben James was the first sinking an American warship in the undeclared war against the Germans in the Atlantic. The loss of the USS Reuben James proved to be a temporary detriment to Navy recruiting efforts.  
   
  U.S. Navy Task Unit 4.1.6, under command of Commander George W. Johnson, screening Convoy ON-28, carried out vigorous attacks on sound contacts. The destroyer USS Babbitt (DD 128) carried out two, while USS Buck (DD 420), USS DuPont (DD 152) (which was unsuccessfully attacked by a U-boat, USS Leary (DD 158) and USS Sampson (DD 394) carried out one attack apiece.  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  Saturday, October 4, 1941  
  The U-111, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wilhelm Kleinschmidt, was sunk by depth charges from the anti-submarine trawler HMS Lady Shirley. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 44 survived. During its career the U-111 sank 4 ships for a total of 24,176 tons and damaged 1 ship damaged for a total of 13,037 tons.  
   
  Sunday, October 19, 1941  
  The U-204, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Walter Kell, was sunk off Cape Spartel, Marocco in the eastern Atlantic Ocean by depth charges from the corvette HMS Mallow (K 81) and the sloop HMS Rochester (L 50). All of the ship’s complement of 46 died. During its career the U-204 sank 1 warship and 4 merchant ships for a total of 17,360 tons.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Wednesday, October 1, 1941  
  A straggler from Convoy ON-19, the British steam tanker San Florentino was torpedoed and sunk by the U-94, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Otto Ites, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 23 died and 35 survivors were picked up by the Canadian corvette HMCS Mayflower (K 191). The 12,842 ton San Florentino was carrying ballast and was bound for Curaçao.  
   
  Thursday, October 2, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy ON-19, the British catapult armed merchant Empire Wave was torpedoed and sunk by the U-562, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Horst Hamm, about 500 miles east of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 29 died and 31 survivors were picked up by the Icelandic trawler Surprise. The 7,463 ton Empire Wave was carrying ballast and was bound for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ON-19, the British steam merchant Hatasu was torpedoed and sunk by the U-431, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wilhelm Dommes, approximately 600 miles east of Cape Race, Newfoundland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 40 died and 7 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS Charles F. Hughes (DD 428). The 3,198 ton Hatasu was carrying ballast and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ON-19A, the Dutch motor merchant Tuva was torpedoed and sunk by the U-575, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Heydemann, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The destroyer USS Winslow (DD 359), in screen of convoy ON 20, was detached from U.S. Navy Task Unit 4.1.3 to proceed to the assistance of the Tuva. Although the USS Winslow found the freighter still afloat, the destroyer depth charged a "doubtful" submarine contact in the vicinity and upon her return was unable to locate any survivors. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 34 survivors were picked up by the Canadian destroyer HMCS St. Croix (I 81). The 4,652 ton Tuva was carrying ballast and was bound for Tampa, Florida.  
   
  Tuesday, October 7, 1941  
  A straggler from Convoy HX-152, the British whale factory ship Svend Foyn was torpedoed and damaged by the U-502, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jürgen von Rosenstiel, south of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 30 died and 298 survived. The 14,795 ton Svend Foyn was carrying oil fuel and aircraft and tanks as deck cargo and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Friday, October 9, 1941  
  A straggler from Convoy OS-7, the British steam merchant Nailsea Manor was torpedoed and sunk by the U-126, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Bauer, northeast of the Cape Verde Islands in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 42 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMS Violet (K 35). The 4,926 ton Nailsea Manor was carrying military stores, including ammunition, mail, and a LCT as deck cargo and was bound for Suez, Egypt.  
   
  Sunday, October 12, 1941  
  The neutral Portuguese steam merchant Corte Real was stopped for inspection by the U-83, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Werner Kraus, 80 miles west of Lisbon in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. It was established that they were carrying contraband because most of the cargo was bound for Canada and Australia. After the crew and passengers abandoned ship the Corte Real was sunk by gunfire. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, all 42 survived and reached land by lifeboat. The 2,044 ton Corte Real was carrying cork, dyes, watches, wine, and canned food and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Tuesday, October 14, 1941  
  The Spanish sailing ship Aingeru Guardakoa was torpedoed and sunk by the U-204, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Walter Kell, in the Bay of Cadiz off Cape Roche in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. The U-204 thought the Aingeru Guardakoa was a a British submarine-chaser.  
   
  Wednesday, October 15, 1941  
  The submarine U-553 began the onslaught against convoy SC 48 attacking the British motorship Silvercedar and Norwegian freighter Ila before the U-boat was driven off by the Canadian destroyer HMCS Columbia. The U-432, U-502, U-558 and U-568, followed by U-73, U-77, U-101 and U-751 would converge on the convoy. Consequently, U.S. Navy Task Unit 4.1.4, under command of Captain Hewlett Thebaud, comprised of four destroyers, was directed to proceed to convoy SC 48's aid as the west-bound convoy it had been escorting, ON 24, was dispersed.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-48, the Norwegian steam merchant Ila was torpedoed and sunk by the U-553, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Karl Thurmann, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and 7 survivors were picked up by the French corvette FFL Mimosa (K 11). The 1,583 ton Ila was carrying steel and general cargo and was bound for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-48, the British motor merchant Silvercedar was torpedoed and sunk by the U-553 in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 21 died and 26 survivors were picked up by the French corvette FFL Mimosa (K 11). The 4,354 ton Silvercedar was carrying general cargo and steel, including small tanks and a deck cargo of three aircraft and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  The unescorted Canadian motor merchant Vancouver Island was torpedoed and sunk by the U-558, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Krech, west of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All 105 of the ship’s complement and passengers died. The 9,472 ton Vancouver Island was carrying passengers, general cargo, copper, aluminum, zinc, asbestos, and steel and was bound for Cardiff, Wales.  
   
  Thursday, October 16, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy SC-48, the British steam merchant Empire Heron was torpedoed and sunk by the U-568, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Joachim Preuss, outheast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 42 died and 1 survivor was picked up by the corvette HMS Gladiolus (K 34). The 6,023 ton Empire Heron was carrying sulfur and was bound for Manchester, England.  
   
  Friday, October 17, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy SC-48, the Norwegian motor tanker Barfonn was torpedoed and sunk by the U-432, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Heinz-Otto Schultze, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and 26 survivors were picked up by the Canadian corvettes HMCS Wetaskiwin (K 175) and the HMCS Baddeck (K 147). The 9,739 ton Barfonn was carrying gas oil and was bound for Old Kirkpatrick, Scotland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-48, the Panamanian steam merchant Bold Venture was torpedoed and sunk by the U-432, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Heinz-Otto Schultze, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 17 died and 17 survivors were picked up by the Canadian corvette HMCS Wetaskiwin (K 175). The 3,222 ton Bold Venture was carrying cotton, iron, steel, copper, and wood and was bound for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-48, the Greek steam merchant Evros was torpedoed and sunk by the U-432 in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 32 died. The 5,283 ton Evros was carrying iron ore and was bound for Ardrossan, Scotland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-48, the Norwegian steam merchant Erviken was torpedoed and sunk by the U-558, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Krech, about 600 miles west of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 22 died and 16 survivors were picked up by the corvettes HMS Abelia (K 184) and HMS Veronica (K 37) and the destroyer HMS Broadwater (H 81). The 6,595 ton Erviken was carrying phosphate and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-48, the Norwegian steam merchant Rym was torpedoed and sunk by the U-558 approximately 600 miles west of Rockall. Of the ship’s complement, all 21 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMS Veronica (K 37). The 1,369 ton Rym was carrying timber and was bound for Londonderry, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-48, the British steam tanker W.C. Teagle was torpedoed and sunk by the U-558 approximately 600 miles west of Rockall. Of the ship’s complement, 35 died and 10 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Broadwater (H 81). The 9,552 ton W.C. Teagle was carrying fuel oil and was bound for Swansea, Wales.  
   
  Saturday, October 18, 1941  
  The unescorted Soviet steam merchant Argun was torpedoed and sunk by the U-132, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Vogelsang, five miles off the Gorodetzkij lighthouse in the Barents Sea in the Arctic Ocean. The 3,487 ton Argun was bound for Iokanga, Soviet Union.  
   
  The unescorted 608 ton Soviet fishing steam trawler RT-8 Seld´ was torpedoed and sunk by the U-132 in the Barents Sea.  
   
  Sunday, October 19, 1941  
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Lehigh was torpedoed and sunk by the U-126, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Bauer, approximately 75 miles west of Freetown, Sierra Leone in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. The vessel was zigzagging and Bauer looking through the periscope, thought she was a Greek ship at first. He saw the USA markings only after he had fired the torpedo from a distance of about 2500 meters.Of the ship’s complement, all 44 survived and were picked up by British motor launches and the destroyer HMS Vimy (D 33). The 4,983 ton Lehigh was carrying ballast and was bound for Takoradi, Ghana.  
   
  The unescorted British motor merchant Inverlee was torpedoed and sunk by the U-204, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Walter Kell, 30 miles from Cape Spartel, Morocco in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 22 died and 21 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Duncan (D 99) and the British armed trawlers HMS Lady Hogarth (4.89) and HMS Haarlem (FY 306). The 9,158 ton Inverlee was carrying Admiralty fuel oil and was bound for Gibraltar.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Baron Kelvin was torpedoed and sunk by the U-206, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Opitz, in the Strait of Gibraltar. Of the ship’s complement, 26 died and 16 survivors were picked up by the Spanish merchant Urola and the destroyer HMS Duncan (D 99). The 3,081 ton Baron Kelvin was carrying ballast and was bound for Melilla, Spain.  
   
  Monday, October 20, 1941  
  Sailing with a small convoy of two tankers and one escort, the British steam tanker British Mariner was torpedoed and damaged beyond repair by the U-126, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Bauer, approximately 80 miles southwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 48 survivors were picked up by a British tug. The 6,996 ton British Mariner was carrying ballast and was bound for Curaçao.  
   
  Tuesday, October 21, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy SL-89, the British steam merchant Serbino was torpedoed and sunk by the U-82, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Siegfried Rollmann, west of Fastnet, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and51 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Asphodel (K 56). The 4,099 ton Serbino was carrying general cargo, including sisal and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-89, the British steam merchant Treverbyn was torpedoed and sunk by the U-82 west of Ireland. All of the ship’s complement of 46 died. The 5,281 ton Treverbyn was carrying iron ore and was bound for Cardiff, Wales.  
   
  Friday, October 24, 1941  
  Sailing with Convoy HG-75, the British steam merchant Alhama was torpedoed and sunk by the U-564, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Reinhard Suhren, approximately 300 miles west of Gibraltar in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 33 survived and were picked up by the French minesweeper FFL Commandant Duboc. The 1,352 ton Alhama was carrying tartaric acid, onions, wines, cork, and general cargo and was bound for Belfast, Ireland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HG-75, the British steam merchant Ariosto was torpedoed and sunk by the U-564 approximately 300 miles west of Gibraltar. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 45 survivors were picked up by the Swedish motor merchant Pacific and the sloop HMS Lamerton (L 88). The 2,176 ton Ariosto was carrying general cargo, including cork and ore and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HG-75, the British steam merchant Carsbreck was torpedoed and sunk by the U-564 approximately 300 miles west of Gibraltar. Of the ship’s complement, 24 died and 18 survivors were picked up by the French minesweeper FFL Commandant Duboc. The 3,670 ton Carsbreck was carrying iron ore, including cork and ore and was bound for Barrow, England.  
   
  Tuesday, October 28, 1941  
  A straggler from Convoy SC-50, the British motor merchant King Malcolm was torpedoed and sunk by the U-106, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hermann Rasch, southeast of St. John’s, Newfoundland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 38 died. The 5,120 ton King Malcolm was carrying potash and was bound for Garston, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HG-75, the British steam merchant Ulea was torpedoed and sunk by the U-432, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Heinz-Otto Schultze, east-northeast of the Azores in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 19 died and 9 survivors were picked up by the corvettes HMS La Malouine (K 46) and HMS Bluebell (K 80). The 1,574 ton Ulea was carrying copper pyrites and was bound for Clyde, United Kingdom  
   
  The British steam merchant Hazelside was torpedoed and sunk by the U-68, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Karl-Friedrich Merten, about 600 miles southeast of St. Helena in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 44 survivors were picked up by the British motor merchant Malayan Prince. The 5,297 ton Hazelside was carrying general cargo, including military stores and was bound for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  Friday, October 31, 1941  
  The British steam merchant Rose Schiaffino was torpedoed and sunk by the U-374, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Unno von Fischel, approximately 225 miles east of St. John’s, Newfoundland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 41 died. The 3,349 ton Rose Schiaffino was carrying iron ore and was bound for Cardiff, Wales.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OS-10, the Dutch steam merchant Bennekom was torpedoed and sunk by the U-96, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Lehmann-Willenbrock, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 46 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Culver (Y 87). The 5,998 ton Bennekom was carrying general cargo and government stores and was bound for Madras, India.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  Saturday, October 4, 1941  
  The destroyer USS Mayo (DD 422), escorting convoy HX 152, after seeing the Swedish motor vessel Kaaparen show a string of lights for five minutes, thus jeopardizing the convoy, hailed the offender and threatened to open fire if the practice was not stopped.  
   
  Tuesday, October 7, 1941  
  U.S. Navy Task Unit 4.1.1, under command of Captain Marion Y. Cohen, assumed escort duty for convoy ON 22 at the Mid-Ocean Meeting Point. Although there were no U-boat attacks on the convoy, ships of TU 4.1.1 carried out depth charges attacks on suspicious contacts on October 8 and 9.  
   
  Wednesday, October 8, 1941  
  The destroyer USS Dallas (DD 199), screening convoy ON 22, depth charged a contact (later evaluated as "non-submarine") approximately 450 miles southwest of Reykjavik, Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  The oiler USS Salinas (AO 19), with convoy HX-152, was damaged by heavy seas and was convoyed to Iceland by the destroyer USS Broome (DD 210).  
   
  Thursday, October 9, 1941  
  U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt asked the U.S. Congress to modify the Neutrality Act to allow American merchant ships to be armed and to allow their passage through combat zones stating, “We cannot permit the­ affirmative defense of our rights to be annulled and diluted by sections of the Neutrality Act which have no realism in the light of unscrupulous ambition of madmen." Read the transcript of his address.  
   
  The destroyer USS Upshur (DD 144), screening convoy ON 22, carried out depth charge attack similar to the USS Dallas's the previous day, against what was evaluated as "non-submarine" approximately 405 miles southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  Friday, October 10, 1941  
  U.S. Navy Task Group 14.3, under command of Rear Admiral H. Kent Hewitt, comprised of the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown (CV 5), battleship USS New Mexico (BB 40), heavy cruiser USS Quincy (CA 39), light cruiser USS Savannah (CL 42), and Destroyer Divisions 3 and 16, set sail from Argentia, Newfoundland, for Casco Bay, Maine. Encountering heavy weather en route, the USS Yorktown, USS New Mexico, USS Quincy, USS Savannah, and destroyers USS Rhind (DD 404), USS Hammann (DD 412), USS Anderson (DD 411), USS Sims (DD 409), USS Mayrant (DD 402), USS Rowan (DD 405), USS Hughes (DD 410), and USS Trippe (DD 403) would all suffer damage before the force reaches Casco Bay on October 13.  
   
  Saturday, October 25, 1941  
  South and Northeast Greenland Patrols were merged and renamed Greenland Patro and designated as U.S. Navy Task Group 24.8 of the Atlantic Fleet.  
   
  Monday, October 27, 1941  
  In a Navy Day speech, U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt made reference to the torpedoing of the USS Kearney by saying that “Hitler’s torpedo was directed at every American.” Roosevelt also spoke of Nazi designs on South America and all religions by stating "This map makes clear the Nazi design not only against South America but against the United States itself … All of us Americans, of all opinions, are faced with the choice between the kind of world we want to live in and the kind of world which Hitler and his hordes would impose upon us." Read the transcript of the speech.  
     
   
     
   
 

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