February 1942 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
  Overview  
   
  3 Allied warships were sunk by U-boats.  
  2 Allied auxiliary warships were sunk by U-boats.  
  1 Allied auxiliary warship was sunk by German aircraft  
  1 Allied warship and 1 Allied auxiliary warship ran aground.  
  2 Allied auxiliary warship sank in accidents.  
  1 U.S. submarine was accidentally damaged by an American war plane.  
   
  2 U-boats were sunk by Allied warships.  
   
  66 Allied or neutral merchant ships were sunk by U-boats totaling 388,321 tons.  
  1 U.S. freighter foundered and sank totaling 3,283 tons.  
  11 Allied merchant ships were damaged by U-boats totaling 78,910 tons.  
  1 U.S. freighter was damaged by a U.S. mine and was damaged  totaling 11,615 tons.  
   
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Monday, February 2, 1942  
  The minesweeping trawlers HMS Cloughton Wyke and HMS Cape Spartel were sunk by German aircraft off the Humber, a large tidal estuary on the east coast of Northern England.  
   
  Thursday, February 5, 1942  
  The corvette HMS Arbutus (K 86), commanded by T/Lt. Arhur L. W. Warren, was torpedoed and sunk by the U-136, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Zimmermann, about 295 nautical miles west of Erris Head, Ireland in the North Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  Saturday, February 7, 1942  
  The unescorted British catapult armed merchant Empire Sun was torpedoed and sunk by the U-751, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Gerhard Bigalk, south of Halifax in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 11 died and 54 survived. The 6,952 ton Empire Sun was carrying grain and was headed for England.  
   
  Monday, February 9, 1942  
  While escorting Convoy ON-60, the Free French corvette FFL Alysse (K 100) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-654, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Ludwig Forster, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 36 died and 34 survivors were picked up by the Canadian corvettes HMCS Moosejaw (K 164) and HMCS Hepatica (K 159).  
   
  Tuesday, February 10, 1942  
  The submarine USS R-5 (SS-82) fired three torpedoes at what she later reported as a German U-boat in the North Atlantic Ocean, but the attack was not successful. By the time the USS R-5 had reloaded, the U-boat was gone. While the USS R-5's captain was criticized for erring in judgment for failing to follow up his contact during darkness and continuing the attack, his inexperience (the USS R-5 was his first command) was considered, as was the fact that it was that commanding officer's first war patrol. The USS R-5's quarry may have been the U-564, which sank the Canadian motor tanker Victolite at the next day.  
   
  Wednesday, February 11, 1942  
  While escorting Convoy SC-67 the Canadian corvette HMCS Spikenard (K 198) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-136, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Zimmermann, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 57 died and 8 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Gentian (K 90).  
   
  Monday, February 16, 1942  
  Operation Neuland began with simultaneous attacks on Dutch and Venezuelan oil ports to disrupt production and flow of petroleum products vital to the Allied war effort. The German submarine U-156 shelled the Standard Oil refinery on Aruba, Netherland West Indies causing no damage. The U-156 also and torpedoed and damaged the U.S. tanker Arkansas as she lay alongside Eagle Dock (see above). The U-boat crew did not emerge from the action unscathed as a shell prematurely exploded in a gun barrel injuring two men.  
   
  Tuesday, February 17, 1942  
  The coastal minesweeper USS Detector (AMc 75) was accidentally sunk in a collision with the U.S. tanker Oswego 300 yards east-northeast of Finn's Ledge Buoy, at the entrance to the north channel at Boston, Massachusetts. There were no casualties.  
   
  The coastal minesweeper USS Paramount (AMc-92) accidentally ran aground off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, and was abandoned without loss. The U.S. Coast Guard cutter USCG Dione (WPG 107) provides assistance. The USS Paramount was salvaged and returned to service.  
   
  Wednesday, February 18, 1942  
  The destroyer USS Truxtun (DD 229) and stores issuing ship USS Pollux (AKS 2) ran aground during storm near Placentia Bay, Newfoundland. The minesweeper USS Brant (AM 24) arrived on the scene and contributed rescue parties as well as bringing a medical officer and corpsmen from the destroyer tender and Support Force flagship USS Prairie (AD 15). The tragedy produced deep admiration for the lifesaving efforts of the local population. "Hardly a dozen men from both ships would have been saved," one observer writes later, "had it not been for the superb work of the local residents." 119 of the USS Truxtun’s crew of 152 died and USS Pollux lost 93 men. The destroyer USS Wilkes (DD 441) also ran aground in the storm but managed to free herself from her predicament and escape the fates of the USS Truxtun and USS Pollux.  
   
  Monday, February 23, 1942  
  U.S. Navy Task Unit 4.1.4, under command of Commander Albert C. Murdaugh, consisting of U.S. four destroyers and the Canadian corvette HMCS Algoma (K 127) continued to shepherd Convoy ON-67. The destroyer USS Edison (DD439) carried out depth charge attacks on a sound contact. The destroyers USS Lea ( DD 118) and USS Bernadou (DD 153) made sweeps on the convoy’s beam, with the latter carrying out a depth charge attack.  
   
  Tuesday, February 24, 1942  
  Convoy ON-67 again came under attack by German submarines. U.S. Navy Task Unit 4.1.4, under command of Commander Albert C. Murdaugh, consisting of U.S. four destroyers and the Canadian corvette HMCS Algoma (K 127) battled the onslaught. The destroyer USS Lea (DD 118) made persistent depth charge attacks on a submarine contact. Although she claimed the destruction of her quarry, no U-boat was in fact lost. The destroyer USS Ediaon (DD 439), TU 4.1.4’s flagship, also erroneously claimed the destruction of a U-boat.  
   
  Wednesday, February 25, 1942  
  U.S. Navy Task Unit 4.1.4, under command of Commander Albert C. Murdaugh, consisting of U.S. four destroyers and the Canadian corvette HMCS Algoma (K 127) continued to conduct vigorous patrolling in the wake of the previous day’s attacks on Convoy ON-67. The convoy would undergo no more U-boat assaults but was the first west-bound convoy under American command to sustain heavy losses.  
   
  Saturday, February 28, 1942  
  The destroyer USS Jacob Jones (DD 130) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-578, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Ernst-August Rehwinkel, while on patrol off Cape May and the Delaware Capes, New Jersey in the western Atlantic Ocean.  Of the ship’s complement, 138 died and 11 survivors were picked up by the patrol craft USS PE-56.  
   
  Saturday, February 28, 1942  
  A PBY Catalina mistakenly bombed and damaged the submarine USS Greenling (SS-213) outside submarine sanctuary off New London, Connecticut.  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  Monday, February 2, 1942  
  The U-581, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Pfeifer, was sunk in the mid-Atlantic southwest of the Azores by depth charges from the British destroyer HMS Westcott (D 47). Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 41 survived. During its career the U-581 sank 1 auxiliary warship.  
   
  Friday, February 6, 1942  
  The U-82, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Siegfried Rollmann, was sunk north of the Azores in the central Atlantic Ocean by depth charges from the sloop HMS Rochester (L 50) and the corvette HMS Tamarisk (K 216). All of the ship’s complement of 45 died. During its career the U-82 sank 1 warship, 8 merchant ships for a total of 51,859 tons and 1 merchant ship for a total of 1,999 tons.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Sunday, February 1, 1942  
  The British steam merchant Tacoma Star was torpedoed and sunk by the U-109, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bleichrodt, about 500 miles east of Hampton Roads, Virginia in the western Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 87 died. The 7,924 ton Tacoma Star was carrying refrigerated and general cargo and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Monday, February 2, 1942  
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker W.L. Steed was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Winter, approximately 90 miles off the mouth of the Delaware River off the coast of the Eastern United States in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 34 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Hartlepool, the armed merchant cruiser HMS Alcantara (F 88) and the British steam merchant Raby Castle. The 6,182 ton W.L. Steed was carrying crude oil and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-173, the Dutch motor tanker Corilla was torpedoed and damaged by the U-751, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Gerhard Bigalk, off the coast of Canada in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 64 survived. The 8,096 ton Corilla was carrying aviation fuel and was bound for Manchester, England.  
   
  Tuesday, February 3, 1942  
  The unescorted Swedish ore carrier Amerikaland was torpedoed and sunk by the U-106, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hermann Rasch, off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 34 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Port Halifax, the Dutch motor merchant Castor, and the Brazilian steam merchant Taubate. The 15,355 ton Amerikaland was one of the largest merchant ships sunk during the war and was carrying ballast and was headed for Cruz Grande, Chile.  
   
  Wednesday, February 4, 1942  
  The unescorted and unarmed Panaman steam merchant San Gil was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Winter, off the coast of Maryland in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 39 survivors were picked up by the patrol vessel USS Nike (WPC 112). The 3,627 ton San Gil was carrying bananas and was headed for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  
   
  Dispersed from convoy ON-55, the British motor merchant Silveray was torpedoed and sunk by the U-751, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Gerhard Bigalk, south of Halifax, Canada in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 41 survivors were picked up by the USCG cutter USS Campbell (WPG 22) and Lucille M. The 4,535 ton Silveray was carrying general cargo and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The U.S. destroyer Lea (DD 118), while escorting Convoy HX-173, went to the assistance of the Soviet steamer Dvinoles, after the latter was damaged in a collision with the Norwegian motor tanker Havprins. The USS Lea, unable to tow the crippled vessel, took off her crew and, leaving her adrift, transported the men to St. John’s, Newfoundland.  
   
  Thursday, February 5, 1942  
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker China Arrow was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Winter, off Winter Quarter Shoals, Virginia in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 37 survived and were picked up by the U.S. Coast Guard cutter USS Nike (WPC 112). The 8,403 ton China Arrow was carrying fuel oil and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker India Arrow was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Winter, approximately 20 miles southeast of Cape May, New Jersey in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 26 died and 12 survivors were picked up by the American fishing skiff Gitana. The 8,327 ton India Arrow was carrying diesel fuel and was bound for Carteret, New Jersey.  
   
  The unescorted Canadian Motor tanker Montrolite was torpedoed and sunk by the U-109, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bleichrodt, northeast of Bermuda in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 28 died and 20 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Winkleigh. The 11,309 ton Montrolite was carrying crude oil and was bound for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  
   
  Friday, February 6, 1942  
  The unescorted British motor merchant Opawa was torpedoed and sunk by the U-106, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hermann Rasch, approximately 400 miles north-northeast of Bermuda in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 56 died and 15 survivors were picked up by the Dutch steam merchant Hercules. The 10,354 ton Opawa was carrying efrigerated foodstuffs, general cargo, and lead and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The unescorted Panamanian steam merchant Halcyon was shelled by U-109 commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bleichrodt, after two torpedoes missed. The U-109 fired 200 shells with the 10.5cm gun and about 60 rounds with the 3.7cm Flak until the Halcyon sank in the western Atlantic Ocean. The 3,531 ton Halcyon was carrying ballast and was headed for Demerara, South America.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Major Wheeler was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Harald Gelhaus, off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 35 died. The 3,431 ton Major Wheeler was carrying suga and was headed for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  
   
  Saturday, February 7, 1942  
  The unescorted British catapult armed merchant Empire Sun was torpedoed and sunk by the U-751, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Gerhard Bigalk, south of Halifax in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 11 died and 54 survived. The 6,952 ton Empire Sun was carrying grain and was headed for England.  
   
  Sunday, February 8, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Ocean Venture was sunk by gunfire by the U-108, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Klaus Scholtz, near Cape Hatteras, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 31 died and 14 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS Roe (DD 418). The 7,174 ton Ocean Venture was carrying foodstuffs and four aircraft as deck cargo and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Monday, February 9, 1942  
  Dispersed from Convoy ON-60, the British steam merchant Empire Fusilier was torpedoed and sunk by the U-85, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Eberhard Greger, southeast of St. Johns, Newfoundland in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 9 died and 38 survivors were picked up by the Canadian corvette HMCS Barrie (K 138). The 5,408 ton Empire Fusilier was carrying ballast and was bound for Tampa, Florida.  
   
  The unarmed and unescorted Norwegian steam merchant Tolosa was torpedoed and sunk by the U-108, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Klaus Scholtz, off the eastern coast of the United States in the western Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 22 died. The 1,974 ton Tolosa was bound for Chester, Pennsylvania.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian motor tanker Anna Knudsen was torpedoed and damaged by the U-586, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Dietrich von der Esch, northwest of Scotland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 23 survived. The 9,057 ton Anna Knudsen was carrying ballast and was bound for Loch Ewe, Scotland.  
   
  Wednesday, February 11, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy SC-67, the Norwegian motor merchant Heina was torpedoed and sunk by the U-136, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Zimmermann, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 30 survived and were picked up by the Canadian corvette HMCS Dauphin (K 157). The 4,028 ton Heina was carrying general cargo and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  The unescorted Canadian motor tanker Victolite was torpedoed and sunk by the U-564, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Reinhard Suhren, approximately 260 miles north-northwest of Bermuda. All of the ship’s complement of 47 died. The TON ton Victolite was carrying ballast and was bound for Las Piedras, Venezuela.  
   
  Thursday, February 12, 1942  
  The unescorted Norwegian steam merchant Blink was torpedoed and sunk by the U-108, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Klaus Scholtz, approximately 160 miles east of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 24 died and 6 survivors were picked up by the American steam merchant Monroe. The 2,701 ton Blink was carrying phosphate and was bound for Ipswich, England.  
   
  Saturday, February 14, 1942  
  Dispersed from Convoy ON-63, the British catapult armed merchant Empire Spring was torpedoed and sunk by the U-576, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Dieter Heinicke, southeast of Halifax, Canada. All of the ship’s complement of 53 died. The 6,946 ton Empire Spring was carrying ballast and was bound for Halifax.  
   
  Sunday, February 15, 1942  
  The neutral Brazilian steam merchant Buarque was torpedoed and sunk by the U-432, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz-Otto Schultze, southwest of Cape Henry, Virginia in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 84 survivors were picked up by the USCGC Calypso (WPC 104), the USS Jacob Jones (DD 130), and the USS Eagle 19 (PE 19). The 5,152 ton Buarque was carrying general cargo, including coffee, cotton, cocoa, and leather.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ON-60, the Greek steam merchant Meropi was torpedoed and sunk by the U-566, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Dietrich Borchert, approximately 35 miles east-southeast of Sambro Lighthouse, Halifax Harbour, Nova Scotia. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 24 died and 15 survived. The 4,181 ton Meropi was carrying ballast and was bound for Halifax.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy ON-62, the British steam merchant Biela was torpedoed and sunk by the U-98, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Robert Gysae, approximately 400 miles southwest of Cape Race, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 50 died. The 5,298 ton Biela was carrying general cargo and was bound for Buenos Aires, Argentina.  
   
  The American tanker Point Breeze suffered explosion in engine room that damaged steering gear, forcing the ship to go around off Throggs Neck, New York in the western Atlantic Ocean. One man was killed and another was blown overboard. The Point Breeze was later floated free and was towed to New York for repairs.  
   
  Monday, February 16, 1942  
  The unescorted Panamanian steam merchant Ramapo was torpedoed and sunk by the U-108, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Klaus Scholtz, west of Bermuda in the western Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 38 died. The 2,968 ton Ramapo was carrying ballast and was bound for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  
   
  The Venezuelan steam tanker Monagas was torpedoed and sunk by the U-502, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jürgen von Rosenstiel, in the Gulf of Venezuela in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 26 survived. The 2,650 ton Monagas was carrying oil products and was bound for Aruba.  
   
  The unescorted British steam tanker San Nicolas was torpedoed and sunk by the U-502 25 miles southwest of Punta Macolla in the Gulf of Venezuela. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 19 survived. The 2,391 ton San Nicolas was carrying crude oil and was bound for Aruba.  
   
  The unescorted British steam tanker Tia Juana was torpedoed and sunk by the U-502 approximately 25 miles southwest of Punta Macolla. Of the ship’s complement, 17 died and 9 survived. The 2,395 ton Tia Juana was carrying crude oil and was bound for Aruba.  
   
  The British steam tanker Oranjestad was torpedoed and sunk by the U-156, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Hartenstein, lying at anchor in the roads of San Nicholas harbor in Aruba. Of the ship’s complement,15 died and 10 survived. The 2,396 ton Oranjestad was carrying crude oil and was bound for San Nicholas.  
   
  The British steam tanker Pedernales was torpedoed and damaged by the U-156 lying at anchor in the roads of San Nicholas harbor in Aruba. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 18 survivors. The 4,317 ton Pedernales was carrying crude oil and was bound for Curaçao.  
   
  The American steam tanker Arkansas was torpedoed and damaged by the U-156 near Aruba in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, all 37 survived. The 6,452 ton Arkansas was empty and was bound for San Nicholas, Aruba.  
   
  The British motor tanker Opalia was damaged when shelled by the 88mm deck gun of the U-564, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Reinhard Suhren, off the eastern coast of the United States in the western Atlantic Ocean. The 6,195 ton Opalia was carrying petrol and paraffin and was bound for Iceland.  
   
  The Dutch steam tanker Rafaela was torpedoed and damaged by the U-67, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Müller-Stöckheim, approximately 1 mile off Willemstad, Curaçao in the western Atlantic Ocean. The 3,177 ton Rafaela was carrying crude oil and was bound for Willemstad.  
   
  The unarmed 11,615 ton U.S. tanker E.H. Blum blundered into an U.S. minefield off Cape Henry, Virginia and was damaged by a mine and broke in half. Both halves of the ship were later salvaged and rejoined, and the  E.H. Blum returned to active service.  
   
  Tuesday, February 17, 1942  
  A straggler from Convoy HX-174, the British motor merchant Empire Comet was torpedoed and sunk by the U-136, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Zimmermann, approximately 35 miles north of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 46 died. The 6,914 ton Empire Comet was carrying general cargo, including manganese ore, linseed, tea, and groundnuts and was bound for Manchester, England.  
   
  Wednesday, February 18, 1942  
  Dispersed from Convoy ON-62, the British steam merchant Somme was torpedoed and sunk by the U-108, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Klaus Scholtz, southeast of Sable Island in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 52 died. The 5,265 ton Somme was carrying general cargo and was bound for Curaçao.  
   
  The neutral Brazilian steam merchant Olinda was stopped by the U-432, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz-Otto Schultze, off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. After the crew abandoned ship the Olinda was shelled by the U-432 and sunk. Of the ship’s complement, all 46 survived and were picked up by the destroyer USS Dallas (DD 199). The 4,053 ton Olinda was carrying cocoa and other food stuffs including coffee and castor beans and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  The American steam merchant Mokihana was torpedoed and damaged by the U-161, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Albrecht Achilles, in the harbor of Port of Spain, Trinidad in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 45 survived. The 7,460 ton Mokihana was carrying lend-lease war material and was bound for the Middle East.  
   
  Thursday, February 19, 1942  
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker Pan Massachusetts was torpedoed and sunk by the U-128, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Heyse, approximately 20 miles off Cape Canaveral, Florida in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 20 died and 18 survivors were picked up by the U.S. Coast Guard ship USCGS Forward. The 8,202 ton Pan Massachusetts was carrying refined petroleum, gasoline, kerosene, and diesel oil and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Miraflores was torpedoed and sunk by the U-432, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz-Otto Schultze, approximately 50 miles east of Atlantic City, New Jersey in the western Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 34 died. The 2,158 ton Miraflores was carrying fruits and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted British motor merchant Empire Seal was torpedoed and sunk by the U-96, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Lehmann-Willenbrock, southeast of Sable Island, Nova Scotia in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement,1 died and 56 survivors were picked up by the British catapult aircraft merchantman Empire Flame. The 7,965 ton Empire Seal was carrying steel and was bound for Belfast, Ireland.  
   
  The British steam tanker British Consul was torpedoed and damaged by the U-161, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Albrecht Achilles, in the harbor of Port of Spain, Trinidad in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 40 survived. The 6,940 ton British Consul was carrying fuel oil.  
   
  Friday, February 20, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam merchant Delplata was torpedoed and sunk by the U-156, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Hartenstein, approximately 60 miles west of Martinique in the eastern Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, all 53 survived and were picked up by the minesweeper USS Lapwing (AVP 1). The 5,127 ton Delplata was carrying general cargo and was bound for St. Thomas, Virgin Islands.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian steam merchant Nordvangen was torpedoed and sunk by the U-129, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Asmus Nicolai Clausen, in the eastern Caribbean Sea. All of the ship’s complement of 24 died. The 2,400 ton Nordvangen was carrying bauxite and was bound for New Orleans, Louisiana.  
   
  The unescorted American motor merchant Lake Osweya was torpedoed and sunk by the U-96, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Lehmann-Willenbrock, southeast of Sable Island, Nova Scotia in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 39 died. The 2,398 ton Lake Osweya was carrying general cargo and was bound for Reykjavik, Iceland.  
   
  Wednesday, February 21, 1942  
  The unescorted Norwegian motor tanker Kongsgaard was torpedoed and sunk by the U-67, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Müller-Stöckheim, seven miles off North Point, Curaçao in the eastern Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 38 died and 8 survivors were picked up by a fishing vessel. The 9,467 ton Kongsgaard was carrying light crude oil and was bound for Aruba.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy ON-60, the British motor tanker Circe Shell was torpedoed and sunk by the U-161, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Albrecht Achilles, 20 miles west-northwest of Port of Spain, Trinidad in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 57 survivors were picked up by the British tug Busy. The 8,207 ton Circe Shell was carrying ballast and was bound for Trinidad.  
   
  The unarmed American steam merchant Azalea City was torpedoed and sunk by the U-432, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz-Otto Schultze, approximately 125 miles east-southeast of Ocean City, Maryland in the western Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 38 died. The 5,529 ton Azalea City was carrying linseed and was bound for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy ON-65, the Norwegian motor tanker Egda was torpedoed and damaged by the U-107, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Harald Gelhaus, in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. The 10,068 ton Egda was carrying ballast and was bound for Aruba.  
   
  Sunday, February 22, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam tanker Cities Service Empire was torpedoed and sunk by the U-128, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Heyse, approximately 25 miles north of Bethel Shoals off the Florida coast in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and 36 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS Biddle (DD 151). The 8,103 ton Cities Service Empire was carrying crude oil and was bound for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-67, the British motor tanker Adellen was torpedoed and sunk by the U-155, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Adolf C. Piening, south of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 36 died and 12 survivors were picked up by the Canadian corvette HMCS Algoma (K 127). The 7,984 ton Adellen was carrying ballast and was bound for Trinidad.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-67, the Norwegian motor merchant Sama was torpedoed and sunk by the U-155 south of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, 19 died and 20 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS Nicholson (DD 442). The 1,799 ton Sama was carrying china clay and was bound for St. John, New Brunswick.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker J.N. Pew was torpedoed and sunk by the U-502, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jürgen von Rosenstiel, approximately 225 miles west of Aruba in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 33 died and 3 survived. The 9,033 ton J.N. Pew was carrying fuel oil and was bound for the Panama Canal.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker Republic was torpedoed and sunk by the U-504, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans-Georg F. Poske, northeast of Jupiter Island Lighthouse, Florida in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 29 survivors were picked up by the American steam tanker Cities Service Missouri or reached shore by lifeboat. The 5,287 ton Republic was carrying water ballast and was bound for Port Arthur, Texas.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian steam merchant Torungen was torpedoed and sunk by the U-96, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Lehmann-Willenbrock, off Nova Scotia in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 19 died. The 1,948 ton Torungen was carrying paper and cellulose and was bound for Charleston, South Carolina.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-175, the British motor tanker Kars was torpedoed and damaged beyond repair by the U-96 off Nova Scotia. Of the ship’s complement, 50 died and 2 survivors were picked up by the Canadian minesweeper HMCS Melville (J 263). The 8,888 ton Kars was carrying aviation fuel and fuel oil and was bound for Belfast, Ireland.  
   
  Monday, February 23, 1942  
  The unescorted Norwegian steam Torungen merchant was torpedoed and sunk by the U-96, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Lehmann-Willenbrock, off Nova Scotia in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 19 died. The 1,948 ton Torungen was carrying paper and cellulose and was bound for Charleston, South Carolina.  
   
  The unescorted Canadian steam merchant George L. Torian was torpedoed and sunk by the U-129, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Asmus N. Clausen, approximately 120 miles south-southeast of Trinidad in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 15 died and 4 survivors were picked up by a flying boat of the U.S. Navy. The 1,754 ton George L. Torian was carrying bauxite and was bound for Trinidad.  
   
  The unescorted Canadian steam merchant Lennox was torpedoed and sunk by the U-129 northeast of Barima, Venezuela. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 18 survivors were picked up by the British steam tanker Athelrill. The 1,904 ton Lennox was carrying bauxite and was bound for Trinidad.  
   
  The unarmed and unescorted American steam merchant West Zeda was torpedoed and sunk by the U-129 approximately 125 miles southeast of Trinidad. Of the ship’s complement, all 35 survived and were picked up by the schooner Emeralda. The 5,658 ton West Zeda was carrying chrome ore as ballast and was bound for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker W.D. Anderson was torpedoed and sunk by the U-504, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans-Georg F. Poske, approximately 12 miles northeast of Jupiter Light, Florida in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 35 died and 1 survivor was picked up by a small fishing boat. The 10,227 ton W.D. Anderson was carrying crude oil and was bound for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  
   
  The unescorted Panamanian motor tanker Thalia was torpedoed and sunk by the U-502, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jürgen von Rosenstiel, in the eastern Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 40 survived. The 8,329 ton Thalia was carrying ballast and was bound for Aruba.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American motor tanker Sun was torpedoed and damaged by the U-502 approximately 55 miles north of Aruba in the eastern Caribbean Sea. The 8,329 ton Thalia was carrying water ballast and was bound for Aruba.  
   
  Tuesday, February 24, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-67, the British steam tanker Empire Celt was torpedoed and sunk by the U-158, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erwin Rostin, approximately 420 miles south-southeast of St. Johns, Newfoundland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 47 survivors were picked up by the Canadian rescue ship Citadelle and the ASW Trawler HMS St. Zeno (FY 280). The 8,032 ton Empire Celt was carrying ballast and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-67, the British motor tanker Diloma was torpedoed and damaged by the U-158 approximately 420 miles south-southeast of St. John’s. The 8,146 ton Diloma was carrying ballast and was bound for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ONS-67, the British steam merchant White Crest was torpedoed and sunk by the U-162, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jürgen Wattenberg, southeast of St. Johns, Newfoundland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 47 died. The 4,365 ton White Crest was carrying coal and coke and was bound for Buenos Aires, Argentina.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-67, the Norwegian motor tanker Eidanger was torpedoed and sunk by the U-558, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Krech, southeast of St. Johns, Newfoundland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 39 survived and were picked up by the British convoy rescue ship Toward. The 9,432 ton Eidanger was carrying ballast and was bound for Mobile, Alabama.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-67, the British steam tanker Inverarder was torpedoed and sunk by the U-558 southeast of St. Johns, Newfoundland. Of the ship’s complement, all 42 survived and were picked up by the British merchant Empire Flame. The 5,578 ton Inverarder was carrying ballast and was bound for Trinidad.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ONS-67, the British motor tanker Anadara was torpedoed and sunk by the U-587, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Borcherdt, southeast of St. Johns, Newfoundland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The Anadara had been damaged earlier in the say by the U-558. All of the ship’s complement of 62 died. The 8,009 ton Anadara was carrying ballast and was bound for Curaçao.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy ON-66, the British steam merchant Empire Hail was torpedoed and sunk by the U-94, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Otto Ites, east of St.Johns, Newfoundland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 49 died. The 7,005 ton Empire Hail was carrying ballast and was bound for Baltimore, Maryland.  
   
  Wednesday, February 25, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam tanker La Carriere was torpedoed and sunk by the U-156, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Hartenstein, approximately 70 miles south by west of Guanica, Puerto Rico in the eastern Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 15 died and 26 survivors were picked up by a U.S. Coast Guard cutter. The 5,685 ton La Carriere was carrying ballast and was bound for Trinidad.  
   
  Thursday, February 26, 1942  
  The unescorted Dutch motor tanker Mamura was torpedoed and sunk by the U-504, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans-Georg F. Poske, approximately 230 miles off the coast of Florida in the western Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 49 died. The 8,245 ton Mamura was carrying gasoline and was bound for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  
   
  Friday, February 27, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Macgregor was sunk by gunfire by the U-156, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Hartenstein, approximately 15 miles northeast of Cabo Frances Viejo, Dominican Republic in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 30 survivors were picked up by a San Domingo Coast Guard cutter. The 2,498 ton Macgregor was carrying water ballast and was bound for Tampa, Florida.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Marore was torpedoed and sunk by the U-432, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz-Otto Schultze, off Wimble Shoals, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 39 survived. The 8,215 ton Marore was carrying iron ore and was bound for Baltimore, Maryland.  
   
  The unescorted American steam tanker R.P. Resor was torpedoed and sunk by the U-578, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Ernst-August Rehwinkel, approximately 20 miles east of Manasquan Inlet, New Jersey in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 47 died and 2 survivors were picked up by the picket boat USCGC CG-4344. The 7,451 ton R.P. Resor was carrying Bunker C fuel oil and was bound for Fall River, Massachusetts.  
   
  Saturday, February 28, 1942  
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker Oregon was torpedoed and sunk by the U-156, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Hartenstein, approximately 150 miles northeast of Mona Passage between Hispaniola and Puerto Rico in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 30 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 7,017 ton Oregon was carrying Navy fuel oil and was bound for Melville, Rhode Island.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian motor merchant Leif was torpedoed and sunk by the U-653, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Gerhard Feiler, east of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 15 died and 10 survivors were picked up by the Swedish steam tanker Sveadrott. The 1,582 ton Leif was carrying cargo including cement and was bound for Ciudad Trujillo, Dominican Republic.  
   
  The Panamanian steam merchant Bayou was sunk by the U-129, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Asmus Nicolai Clausen, off the coast of South America in the western Atlantic Ocean. The 2,605 ton Bayou was carrying manganese ore and was bound for Canada.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  Sunday, February 1, 1942  
  The U.S. Seventh Naval District with headquarters at Key West, Florida, was reestablished.  
   
  U.S. Naval Air Stations, St. Lucia, British West Indies, and British Guiana; and Naval Auxiliary Air Facility, Antigua, British West Indies, were established.  
   
  Thursday, February 5, 1942  
  The first outpost of the Navy's shore establishment in the European theater, a U.S. Naval Operating Base, was commissioned in Londonderry, Northern Ireland. The base was established to serve as a turnaround point for Transatlantic convoys.  
   
  Monday, February 9, 1942  
  TIME magazine reported on the tragedy of the Canadian steam passenger ship Lady Hawkins in a story titled "End of a Lady". The story centered on the sinking of the Canadian passenger ship Lady Hawkins. The unescorted Lady Hawkins had been sunk by the U-66, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Richard Zapp, about 150 miles east of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers 251 died and 71 survivors were later rescued. The closing three sentences of the article referenced a four word quote  that U.S. Navy pilot Donald F. Mason radioed back to base on January 28, 1942 after what was believed to be the first sinking of a U-Boat by American forces: ”Sighted sub, sank same.” As after war reports disclosed that no U-boat had been sunk on January 28, 1942. Mason would lose the distinction of being the first American to sink a U-boat, but the quote attributed to him would go down in naval lore along with other famous quotes such as "Don't give up the ship, and "Damn the Torpedoes, full speed ahead."  
   
  Wednesday, February 11, 1942  
  The minesweeper USS Brant (AM 24) assisted the stranded Norwegian freighter Anderson at St. Shots Bay, Newfoundland.  
   
  Friday, February 13, 1942  
  The destroyer USS Ericsson (DD 440) accidentally sank the Icelandic trawler Greedir in a collision off Hvalfjordur, Iceland.  
   
  Friday, February 27, 1942  
  The Joint U.S.-Mexican Defense Commission was established.  
   
  Saturday, February 28, 1942  
  The U.S. Navy Rescue Tug Service (NRTS) was organized. Responsibility for rescue operations was delegated to the seagoing operations force under Commander in Chief U.S. Fleet. Responsibility for rescue operations in case of vessels in distress 500 miles or less from land was delegated to the Sea Frontier’s commanders. Borderline cases involving vessels approximately 500 miles from land would be the joint responsibility of Commander in Chief U.S. Fleet and the commanders of Sea Frontiers.  
     
   
     
   
 

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