April 1942 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
 
  Overview  
  1 Allied warship was sunk by a mine.  
  1 Allied auxiliary warship was sunk in a collision.  
  1 Allied warship was damaged by a U-boat.  
  1 Allied auxiliary warship was accidently damaged by an American submarine.  
  An Allied merchant ship and an Allied auxiliary warship collided and both ships sank.  
   
  2 U-boats were sunk by Allied warships.  
  1 U-boat was sunk by a mine.  
   
  69 Allied or neutral merchant ships were sunk by U-boats totaling 210,895 tons.  
  10 Allied merchant or neutral ships were damaged by U-boats totaling 74,689 tons.  
   
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Saturday, April 11, 1942  
  The ASW trawler HMS St. Cathan (FY 234), one of the Royal Navy patrol vessels operating off the eastern seaboard, and the Dutch freighter Hebe collided south-southeast of Little River, South Carolina. Both ships sank. The District patrol vessel YP-22 rescued 7 survivors from the HMS St. Cathan and 31 from the Hebe. The yachts USS Azurlite (PY 22) and USS Beryl (PY 23) participated in rescue efforts and between them later transported the survivors (Hebe's entire 31-man crew and nine of the 39-man crew of HMS St. Cathan) to Charleston, South Carolina.  
   
  Sunday, April 19, 1942  
  The U-130, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Ernst Kals, surfaced off the Bullen Baai tank farm on Curaçao and fired five 8.8 cm shells at the petroleum storage facility. It scored no hits on the oil tanks but did wake up the Dutch colonial artillery battery which managed to get off one 120 mm round before the U-boat submerged.  
   
  Sunday, April 26, 1942  
  The destroyer USS Sturtevant (DD 240) was sunk by a mine off Marquesas Key, Florida.  
   
  Tuesday, April 28, 1942  
  U.S. Navy Task Force 99, under command of Rear Admiral Robert C. Giffen, consisting of the battleship USS Washington (BB 56), heavy cruisers USS Wichita (CA 45) and USS Tuscaloosa (CA 37) and four destroyers set sail from Scapa Flow, Orkney Islands as part of a mixed U.S.-British force (Force “Distaff”). British fleet units included the battleship HMS King George V (41), aircraft carrier HMS Victorious (38), light cruiser HMS Kenya (14), and fiver destroyers. The force steamed to waters northeast of Iceland to provide cover for Convoy PQ 15 bound for the Soviet Union.  
   
  U.S. district patrol craft YP-77 was sunk in a collision off the Atlantic Coast.  
   
  Thursday, April 30, 1942  
  While escorting the Convoy QP-11, the light cruiser HMS Edinburgh (16) was torpedoed and damaged by the U-456, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Max-Martin Teichert, north of Murmansk in the Arctic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 57 died. While under tow back to the Kola Inlet the HMS Edinburgh was attacked by three German destroyers and was hit by one torpedo from the SMS Z-24. The HMS Edinburgh was then scuttled by a coup de grâce from the destroyer HMS Foresight (H 68).  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  Friday, April 3, 1942  
  The U-702, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Wolf-Rüdiger von Rabenau, went missing from April 3, 1942 in the North Sea, presumably struck by a drifting mine. All of the ship’s complement of 44 died. During its career the U-702 sank or damaged no ships.  
   
  Tuesday, April 14, 1942  
  The U-85, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Eberhard Greger, was sunk by gunfire from the destroyer USS Roper (DD-147). All of the ship’s complement of 46 died. During its career the U-85 sank 3 merchant ships for a total of 15,060 tons.  
   
  The U-252, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Kai Lerchen, was sunk in the North Atlantic southwest of Ireland by depth charges from the British sloop HMS Stork (L 81) and the British corvette HMS Vetch (K 132). All of the ship’s complement of 44 died. During its career the U-252 sank 1 ship for a total of 1,355 tons.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Wednesday, April 1, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Rio Blanco was torpedoed and sunk by the U-160, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Georg Lassen, about 60 miles east of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Of the ship’s complement, 19 died and 21 survivors were picked up by the ASW Trawler HMS Hertfordshire (FY 176) and the destroyer HMCS Niagara (I 57). The 4,086 ton Rio Blanco was carrying iron ore and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Loch Don was torpedoed and sunk by the U-202, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Heinz Linder, about 500 miles north-northeast of Bermuda in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 44 survivors were picked up by the British sailing ship Helen Forsey. The 5,249 ton Loch Don was carrying general cargo and was headed for Capetown, South Africa.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Eastmoor was torpedoed and sunk by the U-71, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Walter Flachsenberg, about 600 miles east of Hampton Roads, Virginia in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 16 died and 36 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Calgary. The 5,812 ton Eastmoor was carrying general cargo and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker Tiger was torpedoed and sunk by the U-754, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans Oestermann, off Cape Henry, Virginia in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 41 survivors were picked up by the YP-52. The 5,992 ton Tiger was carrying Navy fuel oil and was headed for Norfolk, Virginia.  
   
  Thursday, April 2, 1942  
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker Liebre was torpedoed and damaged by the U-123, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Reinhard Hardegen, approximately 17 miles east of Cape Lookout Outer buoy, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 9 died and 25 survived. The 7,057 ton Liebre was carrying water ballast and was bound for Beaumont, Texas.  
   
  Friday, April 3, 1942  
  The American steam merchant West Irmo was torpedoed and sunk by the U-505, commanded by Axel-Olaf Loewe, about 300 miles southwest of Takoradi, Ghana in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 10 died and 99 survivors were picked up by the minesweeping trawler HMS Copinsay (T 147). The 5,775 ton West Irmo was carrying general cargo and was headed for Lagos, Nigeria.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant David H. Atwater was sunk by gunfire by the U-552, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erich Topp, about ten miles east of Chincoteague Inlet, Virginia in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 24 died and 3 survivors were picked up by the US Coast Guard vessel CG-218. The 2,438 ton David H. Atwater was carrying coal and was headed for Fall River, Massachusetts.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Otho was torpedoed and sunk by the U-754, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans Oestermann, about 200 miles east of Cape Henry, Virginia in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 32 died and 21 survivors were picked up by the patrol yacht USS Zircon (PY 16) and the Norwegian motor tanker Gallia. The 4,839 ton Otho was carrying maganese ore, palm oil, and tin and was headed for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  
   
  Saturday, April 4, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam tanker Comol Rico was torpedoed and sunk by the U-154, commanded by Walther Kölle, about 225 miles north of San Juan, Puerto Rico in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 39 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS Sturtevant (DD-240). The 5,034 ton Comol Rico was carrying bulk molasses and was headed for Boston, Massachusetts.  
   
  The unescorted Dutch steam merchant Alphacca was torpedoed and sunk by the U-505, commanded by Axel-Olaf Loewe, off the coast of Africa in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 15 died and 57 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 5,759 ton Alphacca was carrying general cargo, including copper, vanadium, and zinc and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The 6,207 ton British motor tanker Ensis was slightly damaged by 20mm gunfire from by the U-572, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Heinz Kummetat, in th Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  Sunday, April 5, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam tanker Catahoula was torpedoed and sunk by the U-154, commanded by Walther Kölle, off the northwest coast of the Dominican Republic in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 38 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS Sturtevant (DD-240). The 5,030 ton Catahoula was carrying molasses and was headed for Wilmington, Delaware.  
   
  The American steam tanker Byron D. Benson was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Erich Topp, 7.5 miles off Currituck Inlet, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 10 died and 27 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS Hamilton (DMS 18), the ASW Trawler HMS Norwich City (FY 229) and the Coast Guard cutter USS Dione. The 7,953 ton Byron D. Benson was carrying crude oil and was headed for Bayonne, New Jersey.  
   
  Monday, April 6, 1942  
  The Norwegian motor tanker Koll was torpedoed and sunk by the U-571, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Möhlmann, east of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 33 survivors were picked up by the Portuguese steam merchant Cunene, the Swiss steam merchant St. Cergue, and the Portuguese steam merchant Lobito. The 10,044 ton Koll was carrying high grade diesel oil and was headed for Clyde, United Kingdom.  
   
  The Norwegian motor tanker Kollskegg was torpedoed and sunk by the U-754, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans Oestermann, about 350 miles northwest of the Bermudas in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 38 survivors were picked up by the the Panamanian steam merchant Bushranger and a Canadian warship. The 9,858 ton Kollskegg was carrying crude oil and fuel oil and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The unarmed and unescorted American motor tanker Bidwell was torpedoed and damaged by the U-160, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg Lassen, approximately 30 miles east-southeast of Cape Lookout, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 32 survived. The 6,837 ton Bidwell was carrying fuel oil and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Tuesday, April 7, 1942  
  The British motor tanker British Splendour was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erich Topp, east of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 21 died and 41 survivors were picked up by the ASW trawler HMS St. Zeno (FY 280). The 7,138 ton British Splendour was carrying benzine and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The British motor tanker Norwegian whale factory ship Lancing was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552 east of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 49 survivors were picked up by the American tanker Pan Rhode Island. The 7,866 ton Lancing was carrying fuel oil and was headed for the New York, New York.  
   
  Wednesday, April 8, 1942  
  The Yugoslavian steam merchant Nemanja was torpedoed and sunk by the U-84, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Horst Uphoff, in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 13 died and 34 survived. The 5,226 ton Nemanja was carrying sugar and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker Esso Baton Rouge was torpedoed and damaged by the U-123, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Reinhard Hardegen, approximately 15 miles northeast of St. Simons Island, Georgia in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 35 survived. The 7,989 ton Esso Baton Rouge was carrying heating and lubricating oil and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker Oklahoma was torpedoed and damaged by the U-123 approximately 10 miles off St. Simon´s Island. Of the ship’s complement, 19 died and 18 survived. The 9,264 ton Oklahoma was carrying refined petroleum products and was bound for Providence, Rhode Island.  
   
  Thursday, April 9, 1942  
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Esparta was torpedoed and sunk by the U-123, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Reinhard Hardegen, about 14 miles south of Brunswick, Georgia in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 39 survivors were picked up by the patrol boat USS Tyrer (WIX 339). The 3,365 ton Esparta was carrying general cargo, including bananas and coffee and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Malchace was torpedoed and sunk by the U-160, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Georg Lassen, about 25 miles off Cape Lookout, North Carolina. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 28 survivors were picked up by the Mexican steam tanker Faja de Oro. The 3,516 ton Malchace was carrying soda ash and was headed for Hopewell, New Jersey.  
   
  The Norwegian steam merchant Fanefjeld was torpedoed and sunk by the U-252, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Kai Lerchen, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 24 died. The 1,355 ton Fanefjeld was carrying salt and was headed for Isafjord, Iceland.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker Atlas was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erich Topp, off Cape Lookout in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 32 survivors were picked up by a US Coast Guard cutter. The 7,137 ton Atlas was carrying gasoline and was headed for Seawarren, New Jersey.  
   
  Friday, April 10, 1942  
  The unescorted British motor tanker San Delfino was torpedoed and sunk by the U-203, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Rolf Mützelburg, east of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Of the ship’s complement, 28 died and 22 survivors were picked up by the ASW trawler HMS Norwich City (FY 229). The 8,072 ton San Delfino was carrying aviation fuel and was headed for Hull, England.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker Tamaulipas was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erich Topp, about 18 miles northeast of Cape Lookout, North Carolina. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 35 survivors were picked up by the ASW trawler HMS Norwich City (FY 229). The 6,943 ton Tamaulipas was carrying furnace oil and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Empire Prairie was torpedoed and sunk by the U-654, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Ludwig Forster, east of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. All of the ship’s complement of 49 died. The 7,010 ton Empire Prairie was carrying general cargo and was headed for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian motor merchant Chr. Knudsen was torpedoed and sunk by the U-85, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Eberhard Greger, in the western Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 33 died. The 4,904 ton Chr. Knudsen was carrying general cargo and nitrate and was headed for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  Saturday, April 11, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam tanker Gulfamerica was illuminated by the lights of the Jacksonville Beach resort and torpedoed and sunk by the U-123, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Reinhard Hardegen, about five miles off Jacksonville, Florida. Of the ship’s complement, 19 died and 29 survivors were picked up by U.S. Coast Guard patrol boats. The 8,081 ton Gulfamerica was carrying furnace oil and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian motor merchant Grenanger was torpedoed and sunk by the U-130, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Ernst Kals, in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 36 survived and were picked up by the British steam merchant Almenara. The 5,393 ton Grenanger was carrying general cargo and coffee and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted British steam passenger ship Ulysses was torpedoed and sunk by the U-160, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Georg Lassen, 45 miles south of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, all 290 survived and were picked up by the destroyer USS Manley (APD 1). The 14,647 ton Ulysses was carrying passengers, general cargo, and pig iron and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  The unarmed American steam tanker Harry F. Sinclair, Jr. was torpedoed and damaged by the U-203, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Rolf Mützelburg, 7 miles south of Cape Lookout, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 10 died and 26 survived. The 6,151 ton Harry F. Sinclair, Jr. was carrying gasoline and was bound for Norfolk, Virginia.  
   
  Sunday, April 12, 1942  
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker Esso Boston was torpedoed and sunk by the U-130, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Ernst Kals, northeast of St. Martins in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 37 survived and were picked up by the destroyer USS Biddle (DD 151). The 7,699 ton Esso Boston was carrying crude oil and was headed for Halifax, Canada.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Delvalle was torpedoed and sunk by the U-154, commanded by Walther Kölle, in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 61 survivors were picked up by the armed merchant cruiser HMCS Prince Henry (F 70). The 5,032 ton Delvalle was carrying general cargo and was headed for Buenos Aires, Argentina.  
   
  The Panamanian steam tanker Stanvac Melbourne was torpedoed and damaged by the U-203, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Rolf Mützelburg, about 15 miles from Frying Shoal Inside Buoy, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and armed guard, 3 died and 37 survived. The 10,013 ton Stanvac Melbourne was carrying ballast and was bound for Aruba.  
   
  Monday, April 13, 1942  
  The unescorted Swedish motor merchant Korsholm was torpedoed and sunk by the U-123, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Reinhard Hardegen, approximately 70 miles off Cape Canaveral, Florida in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 9 died and 17 survived. The 2,647 ton Korsholm was carrying phosphate and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Leslie was torpedoed and sunk by the U-123 approximately three miles southeast of the Hetzel Shoals Gas Buoy, Florida. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 28 survivors were picked up by the American tanker Esso Bayonne. The 2,609 ton Leslie was carrying raw sugar and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted British steam tanker Empire Amethyst was torpedoed and sunk by the U-154, commanded by Walther Kölle, about 40 miles south of Haiti in the Caribbean. All of the ship’s complement of 47 died. The 8,032 ton Empire Amethyst was carrying motor fuel and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy ON-80, the British steam merchant Empire Progress was torpedoed and sunk by the U-402, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Siegfried von Forstner, south of Cape Race, Newfoundland in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 12 died and 38 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian motor merchant Olaf Fostenes. The 5,249 ton Empire Progress was carrying ballast and was headed for Tampa, Florida.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy QP-10, the Panamanian steam merchant El Occidente was torpedoed and sunk by the U-435, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Siegfried Strelow, in the far northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 20 died and 21 survivors were picked up by the minesweeper HMS Speedwell. The 6,008 ton El Occidente was carrying chrome ore as ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy QP-10, the British steam merchant Harpalion was bombed and heavily damaged by German Ju88 aircraft. The vessel was abandoned by the crew and a reported scuttling attempt by the escort failed because her abandoned wreck was located by U-435 in the far northern Atlantic Ocean which sank the vessel. Of the ship’s complement, all 70 survived. The 5,486 ton Harpalion was carrying mineral ores as ballast and was headed for Reykjavik, Iceland.  
   
  The Soviet steam merchant Kiev was torpedoed and sunk by the U-436, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Seibicke, in the far northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 survived and were picked up by the ASW trawler HMS Blackfly. The 5,823 ton Kiev was carrying chrome and timber and was headed for Iceland.  
   
  Tuesday, April 14, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Empire Thrush was torpedoed and sunk by the U-203, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Rolf Mützelburg, about 8 miles north of Diamond Shoals off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 55 survived and were picked up by the American Q-ship USS Asterion (AK 100). The 6,160 ton Empire Thrush was carrying rock phosphate, TNT, and citrus pulp and was headed for River Mersey, England.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Margaret was torpedoed and sunk by the U-571, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Möhlmann, off Cape Cod, Massachusetts. All of the ship’s complement of 29 died. The 3,352 ton Margaret was carrying sugar and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted Greek steam merchant Korthion was torpedoed and sunk by the U-66, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Richard Zapp, south of Barbados in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and 9 survived. The 2,116 ton Korthion was carrying bauxite and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Thursday, April 16, 1942  
  The ship of the convoy commodore of Convoy PQ-14, the British steam merchant Empire Howard was torpedoed and sunk by the U-403, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz-Ehlert Clausen, in the far northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 25 died and 37 survivors were picked up by the British armed trawler HMS Lord Middleton (FY 219) and the British armed trawler HMS Northern Wave (FY 153). The 6,985 ton Empire Howard was carrying war materials, including army trucks and was headed for Murmansk, Soviet Union.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed Panamanian steam merchant Desert Light was torpedoed and sunk by the U-572, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz Hirsacker, in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 30 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS Roper (DD 147). The 2,368 ton Desert Light was carrying supplies for the Naval Operating Base in Bermuda, including ammunition and dynamite.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Robin Hood was torpedoed and sunk by the U-575, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Heydemann, about 300 miles southeast of Nantucket Island, Massachusetts in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and 24 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS Greer (DD 145). The 6,887 ton Robin Hood was carrying chrome ore, asbestos, concentrates, and general cargo and was headed for Boston, Massachusetts.  
   
  The unescorted Dutch steam tanker Amsterdam was torpedoed and sunk by the U-66, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Richard Zapp, 60 miles west of British Grenada in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 38 survivors were picked up by the Yugoslavian steam merchant Ivan. The 7,329 ton Amsterdam was carrying oil and was headed for Freetown, Sierra Leone.  
   
  Friday, April 17, 1942  
  The unarmed and unescorted American steam merchant Alcoa Guide was sunk by gunfire by the U-123, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Reinhard Hardegen, about 300 miles east of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 28 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS Broome (DD-210) and the British steam merchant Hororata. The 4,834 ton Alcoa Guide was carrying general Army supplies, including flour and 8 tanks and was headed for Pointe-à-Pitre, Guadeloupe.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed Panamanian motor tanker Heinrich von Riedemann was torpedoed and sunk by the U-66, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Richard Zapp, off the coast of South America in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, all 44 survived  by reaching land by lifeboat or were picked up by the steam merchant Maricaibo. The 11,020 ton Heinrich von Riedemann was carrying barrels of crude oil and was headed for Aruba, Lesser Antilles.  
   
  Saturday, April 18, 1942  
  The unescorted and neutral Argentinean motor tanker Victoria was torpedoed and damaged by the U-201, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Adalbert Schnee, approximately 300 miles east of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 39 survived. The 7,417 ton Victoria was carrying linseed oil and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Sunday, April 19, 1942  
  Sailing in a two column convoy, the unarmed American steam tanker Axtell J. Byles was torpedoed and damaged by the U-136, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Zimmermann, approximately four miles off Wimble Shoals, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 40 survived. The 8,955 ton Axtell J. Byles was carrying crude oil and fuel oil and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Monday, April 20, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Harpagon was torpedoed and sunk by the U-109, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bleichrodt, about 150 miles north-northwest of Bermuda in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 41 died and 8 survivors were picked up by the Argentinean merchant Rio Diamante. The 5,719 ton Harpagon was carrying general cargo, including explosives, aircraft, and tanks and was headed for Bombay, India.  
   
  The unescorted Canadian steam merchant Vineland was torpedoed and sunk by the U-154, commanded by Walther Kölle, north of Cap Haitien, Haiti in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 34 survived. The 5,587 ton Vineland was carrying ballast and was headed for St. Thomas, Virgin Islands.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Empire Dryden was torpedoed and sunk by the U-572, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz Hirsacker, east of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Of the ship’s complement, 26 died and 25 survivors were picked up by the passenger ship Monarch of Bermuda. The 7,164 ton Empire Dryden was carrying government and general cargo and was headed for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  The unescorted Swedish motor merchant Agra was torpedoed and sunk by the U-654, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Ludwig Forster, in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 33 survived. The 4,569 ton Agra was carrying general cargo, including nitrate, and motor trucks and was headed for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Steel Maker was torpedoed and sunk by the U-654 approximately 350 miles east of Wilmington, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 47 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS Rowan (DD-405) and the British steam merchant Pacific Exporter. The 6,176 ton Steel Maker was carrying war supplies and was headed for Abadan, Iran.  
   
  Tuesday, April 21, 1942  
  The Norwegian steam merchant Bris was torpedoed and sunk by the U-201, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Adalbert Schnee, in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 21 survivors were picked up by the American motor tanker Chester D. Swain and the YT-132. The 2,027 ton Bris was carrying asphalt and flour and was headed for Natal, Brazil.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Pipestone County was torpedoed and sunk by the U-576, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Dieter Heinicke, about 475 miles east of Cape Henry, Virginia in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 46 survived and were picked up by the Norwegian steam merchant Tropic Star, the patrol vessel USCGC Calypso (WPC 104), and the American fishing vessel Irene. The 5,102 ton Pipestone County was carrying bauxite and was headed for Boston, Massachusetts.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant West Imboden was torpedoed and sunk by the U-752, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Karl-Ernst Schroeter, east of Nantucket Lightship, Massachusetts. Of the ship’s complement, all 35 survived and were picked up by the destroyer USS Bristol (DD 453). The 5,751 ton West Imboden was carrying general cargo and was headed for Boston, Massachusetts.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed Panamanian steam merchant Chenango was torpedoed and sunk by the U-84, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Horst Uphoff, southeast of Cape Henry, Virginia in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 31 died and 1 survivor was picked up by a PBY Catalina flying boat of the U.S. Coast Guard. The 3,014 ton Chenango was carrying manganese ore and was headed for Baltimore, Maryland.  
   
  Wednesday, April 22, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Derryheen was torpedoed and sunk by the U-201, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Adalbert Schnee, southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 51 survived and were picked up by the British motor merchant Lobos. The 7,217 ton Derryheen was carrying general cargo, including nitrates, and motor trucks and was headed for the Middle East.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam passenger ship San Jacinto was torpedoed and sunk by the U-201approximately 375 miles southeast of Cape Hatteras. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 14 died and 169 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS Rowan (DD-405). The 6,069 ton San Jacinto was carrying general cargo and passengers and was headed for San Juan, Puerto Rico.  
   
  Thursday, April 23, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam merchant Lammot Du Pont was torpedoed and sunk by the U-125, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Folkers, about 500 miles southeast of Bermuda in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 17 died and 37 survivors were picked up by the Swedish motor merchant Astri and the destroyer USS Tarbell (DD-142). The 5,102 ton Lammot Du Pont was carrying linseed and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian motor merchant Reinholt was torpedoed and damaged by the U-752, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Karl-Ernst Schroeter, off the eastern coast of the United States in the western Atlantic Ocean. The 4,799 ton Reinholt was carrying hides and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Friday, April 24, 1942  
  The unescorted British motor merchant Empire Drum was torpedoed and sunk by the U-136, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Zimmermann, north of Bermuda in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 51 survived and were picked up by the Swedish merchant Venezia and a U.S. destroyer. The 7,244 ton Empire Drum was carrying war supplies and explosives and was headed for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  Saturday, April 25, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Modesta was torpedoed and sunk by the U-108, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Klaus Scholtz, about 110 miles northwest of Bermuda in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 18 died and 23 survivors were picked up by the Belgian steam merchant Belgian Airman. The 3,849 ton Modesta was carrying bauxite and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Sunday, April 26, 1942  
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Alcoa Partner was torpedoed and sunk by the U-66, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Richard Zapp, about 80 miles north-northeast of Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 10 died and 25 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 5,513 ton Alcoa Partner was carrying bauxite ore and was bound for Mobile, Alabama.  
   
  Tuesday, April 28, 1942  
  The unescorted steam merchant Arundo was torpedoed and sunk by the U-136, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Zimmermann, about 15 miles south of the Ambrose Lightship, the marker for Ambrose Channel, the main shipping channel for New York Harbor. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 37 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS Lea (DD-118). The 5,163 ton Arundo was carrying government cargo, including nitrate, jeeps, trucks, 5000 crates of Canadian beer, and two locomotives as deck cargo and was headed for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  Wednesday, April 29, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam tanker Mobiloil was torpedoed and sunk by the U-108, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Klaus Scholtz, about 350 miles northeast of Turks Island in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 52 survived and were picked up by the patrol craft USS PC-490. The 9,925 ton Mobiloil was carrying water ballast and was headed for Caripito, Venezuela.  
   
  The unescorted Panamanian motor tanker Harry G. Seidel was torpedoed and sunk by the U-66, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Richard Zapp, northwest of Trinidad in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 48 survived. The 10.354 ton Harry G. Seidel was carrying ballast and was headed for Caripito, Venezuela.  
   
  Thursday, April 30, 1942  
  Dispersed from Convoy OS-25, the British motor tanker Athelempress was torpedoed and sunk by gunfire by the U-162, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jürgen Wattenberg, about 180 miles east of Barbados in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and and some of the 47 survivors reached land by lifeboat and others were picked up by the Norwegian motor tanker Atlantic. The 8,941 ton Athelempress was carrying ballast and was bound for Trinidad.  
   
  The Soviet steam merchant Ashkhabad was torpedoed and sunk by the U-402, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Siegfried von Forstner, about 8 miles south of Cape Lookout, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 47 survived and were picked up by an escort. The 5,284 ton Ashkhabad was carrying ballast and was bound for Matanzas, Cuba.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker Federal was sunk by gunfire by the U-507, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Harro Schacht, off the coast of Cuba in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 28 survivors were picked up by fishing craft from Gibara. The 2,881 ton Federal was carrying water ballast and was bound for Banes, Cuba.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian steam merchant Taborfjell was torpedoed and sunk by the U-576, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Dieter Heinicke, about 95 miles east of Cape Cod, Massachusetts in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 17 died and 3 survivors were picked up by the submarine HMS P-552. The 1,339 ton Taborfjell was carrying unrefined sugar and chrome ore and was bound for Montreal, Canada.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  Tuesday, April 7, 1942  
  The destroyer USS Wilkes (DD 441) was damaged when accidentally rammed by the British tanker Davila at Boston, Massachusetts.  
   
  Wednesday, April 8, 1942  
  The submarine USS Mackerel (SS 204) was attacked by a USAAF plane six miles south of Watch Hill Light, Rhode Island but was not damaged in the accidental encounter.  
   
  Thursday, April 9, 1942  
  The motor torpedo boat PT-59, on a practice run in upper Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, accidentally torpedoed the cargo ship USS Capella (AK 13). Tugs were on the scene immediately and anchored the damaged auxiliary in shoal water. Eight crewmen were injured in the mishap.  
   
  Sunday, April 12, 1942  
  The U.S. Coast Guard cutter USCG Vigilant (WPC 154) ran aground during a search for submarine off St. Lucie Inlet, Florida but emerged from the incident with only minor damage.  
   
  Tuesday, April 28, 1942  
  A nightly "dim-out" or "black-out" went into effect along a fifteen-mile strip of the Atlantic coast around New York to counter German submarine activity in the area. Lights were allowed to be used at the Polo Grounds and Ebbets Field for only one hour around sunset. The New York Giants and Brooklyn Dodgers decided to replace night games originally scheduled with “twilight” games.  
   
  Wednesday, April 29, 1942  
  The first coastal convoy left New York, New York for the Delaware River.  
   
  Thursday, April 30, 1942  
  Admiral Harold R. Stark assumed command of U.S. Naval Forces Europe.  
     
   
     
   
 

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