May 1942 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
 
  Overview  
  1 Allied warship was sunk by a U-boat.  
  1 Allied warship was sunk in an accident.  
  3 Allied auxiliary warships were sunk by U-boats.  
  1 Allied warship was damaged by a U-boat.  
  2 Allied auxiliary warships were sunk in accidents.  
  1 Allied warship was damaged in an accident.  
  1 Allied auxiliary warship was damaged in an accident.  
   
  2 U-boats were sunk by Allied warships.  
   
  120 Allied or neutral merchant ships were sunk by U-boats totaling 575,105 tons.  
  18 Allied merchant ships were damaged by U-boats totaling 119,172 tons.  
  1 Allied merchant ship was damaged by German aircraft.  
   
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Friday, May 1, 1942  
  While on duty with convoy PQ-15, visibility suddenly closed in and the battleship HMS King George V (41) accidentally collided with the port side of the destroyer HMS Punjabi (F 21) just abaft the engine room. The HMS Punjabi's stern sank almost immediately. Her ready-use depth charges detonated, bucking the battleship's sides below the waterline and causing severe injuries to the survivors. The battleship USS Washington (BB 56), unable to maneuver to clear the wreckage, had to steam through it. Fortunately, the HMS Punjabi's forepart sank quite slowly allowing 169 people to be rescued by the destroyers HMS Martin (G 44) and HMS Marne (G 35).  
   
  Saturday, May 2, 1942  
  While under tow back to the Kola Inlet the light cruiser HMS Edinburgh was attacked by three German destroyers and was hit by one torpedo from the SMS Z-24. The HMS Edinburgh was then scuttled by a coup de grâce from the destroyer HMS Foresight (H 68). The HMS Edinburgh has been damaged by the U-456 north of Murmansk in the Arctic Ocean on April 30.  
   
  The patrol yacht USS Cythera (PY 26) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-402, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Siegfried von Forstner, approximately 115 miles east of Cape Fear, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 69 died and 2 survivors were taken prisoner by the U-402.  
   
  Wednesday, May 6, 1942  
  The auxiliary USS Semmes (AG 24) was damaged when she accidentally rammed and sank the armed trawler HMS Senateur Duhamel off Cape Lookout, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  Tuesday, May 12, 1942  
  While on anti-submarine patrol under control by the U.S. Navy off Cape Lookout, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean the antisubmarine trawler HMS Bedfordshire (FY 141), commanded by Lt. Russell B. Davis, was torpedoed and sunk by the U-558, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Krech. All of the ship’s complement of 37 died.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-92, the British catapult armed merchant Empire Dell was torpedoed and sunk by the U-124, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Johann Mohr, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 46 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMCS Shediac (K 110) and the British rescue ship Bury. The 7,065 ton Empire Dell was carrying ballast and was headed for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  
   
  Thursday, May 14, 1942  
  The U-213 mined the waters off St. John's, Newfoundland in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  Sunday, May 17, 1942  
  The destroyer USS Hambleton (DD 455) was damaged in a collision with the destroyer USS Ellyson (DD 454) while in U.S. Navy Task Force 36, en route to the United States from the Gold Coast of Africa.  
   
  Wednesday, May 20, 1942  
  District patrol craft YP-387 was sunk in a collision off the coast of Delaware in the western Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  Monday, May 25, 1942  
  While patrolling off Martinique in the French West Indies in the western Atlantic Ocean, the destroyer USS Blakeley (DD 150) was torpedoed and damaged by the U-156, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Hartenstein. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 116 survived.  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  Saturday, May 9, 1942  
  The U-352, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hellmut Rathke, was sunk by depth charges from the U.S. Coast Guard cutter USCGC Icarus in the North Atlantic south-west of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Of the ship’s complement, 15 died and 38 survived. During its career the U-352 sank or damaged no ships.  
   
  Friday, May 29, 1942  
  The U-568, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Joachim Preuss, was sunk by depth charges from the destroyer HMS Hero (H 99) and the escort destroyers HMS Eridge (L 68) and HMS Hurworth (L 28). All of the ship’s complement of 47 died. During its career the U-568 sank 2 warships, damaged 1 warship, and sank 1 merchant ship for a total of 6,023 tons.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Friday, May 1, 1942  
  The unescorted Brazilian steam merchant Parnahyba was torpedoed and then sunk by gunfire by the U-162, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jürgen Wattenberg, near Trinidad in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 65 survived. The 6,692 ton Parnahyba was carrying coffee, cocoa, castor oil seed, and cotton and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The British four-masted schooner James E. Newsom was sunk by gunfire by the U-69, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Ulrich Gräf, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. The 671 ton James E. Newsom was carrying salt and was headed for Nova Scotia.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed Norwegian motor merchant Bidevind was torpedoed and sunk by the U-752, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Karl-Ernst Schroeter, about 75 miles southeast of Ambrose Lightship, New York Harbor in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 36 survived. The 4,956 ton Bidevind was carrying manganese ore, general cargo, and hides and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy QP-11, the Soviet motor merchant Tsiolkovskij was torpedoed and damaged by the U-589, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Joachim Horrer, in the Barents Sea in the Arctic Ocean. The damaged Tsiolkovskij was later sunk as straggler by the German destroyers Z-24 and Z-25. Of the ship’s complement, 27 died and 14 survived and were picked up the ASW Trawler HMS Lord Middleton (FY 219). The 2,847 ton Tsiolkovskij was bound for Loch Ewe, Scotland.  
   
  The unescorted British motor merchant La Paz was torpedoed and damaged by the U-109, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Heinrich Bleichrodt, approximately 10 miles southeast of Cape Canaveral, Florida in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 57 survived. The 6,548 ton La Paz was carrying general cargo, including whisky and was bound for Valparaiso, Chile.  
   
  Saturday, May 2, 1942  
  The unescorted Norwegian motor tanker Sandar was torpedoed and sunk by the U-66, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Richard Zapp, near Trinidad in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 34 survivors were picked up by the American merchant Alcoa Pilot. The 7,624 ton Sandar was carrying fuel oil and was headed for Gibraltar.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy PQ-15, the British steam merchant Jutland as torpedoed and damaged by a German torpedo aircraft of I/KG 26 south of Bear Island in the far northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 62 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Badsworth (L 03). The 6,153 ton Jutland was carrying military stores, including cordite and ammunition and was headed for Murmansk, Soviet Union.  
   
  Sunday, May 3, 1942  
  The unescorted Dutch steam merchant Laertes was torpedoed and sunk by the U-109, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bleichrodt, southeast of Cape Canaveral, Florida in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 18 died and 48 survivors were picked up by a US Navy flying boat. The 5,825 ton Laertes was carrying war material, including 3 aircraft, 17 medium tanks, and 20 trucks and was heading for Bombay, India.  
   
  The unescorted Dominican steam merchant San Rafael was sunk by gunfire by the U-125, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Folkers, in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 37 survived. The 1,973 ton San Rafael was headed for Kingston, Jamaica.  
   
  The abandoned British steam merchant Jutland, which had been damaged the day before by a German torpedo aircraft of I/KG 26, was torpedoed and sunk by the U-251, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Timm, south of Bear Island in the far northern Atlantic Ocean. The 6,153 ton Jutland was carrying military stores, including cordite and ammunition and was headed for Murmansk, Soviet Union.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ON-89, the British steam tanker British Workman was torpedoed and sunk by the U-455, commanded by Hans-Heinrich Giessler, south-southeast of Cape Race, Newfoundland in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 47 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMCS Assiniboine (I 18) and the corvette HMCS Alberni (K 103). The 6,994 ton British Workman was carrying Ballast and was headed for Galveston, Texas.  
   
  The Nicaraguan motor merchant Sama was sunk by the U-506, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erich Würdemann, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 14 survived. The 567 ton Sama was carrying bananas and was headed for Jacksonville, Florida.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Ocean Venus was torpedoed and sunk by the U-564, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Reinhard Suhren, about 12 miles east-southeast of Cape Canaveral, Florida in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 42 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 7,174 ton Ocean Venus was carrying general cargo, including lead, lumber, canned herring, and acetone and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy ON-87, the British motor tanker Geo. W. McKnight was torpedoed and damaged by the U-66, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Richard Zapp, off Trinidad in the southern Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, all 55 survived. The 12,502 ton Geo. W. McKnight was carrying ballast and was bound for Trinidad.  
   
  Monday, May 4, 1942  
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Tuscaloosa City was torpedoed and sunk by the U-125, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Folkers, about 200 miles west of Negrit, Jamaica in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, all 34 survived and were picked up by the American steam merchant Falcon. The 5,687 ton Tuscaloosa City was carrying general cargo, including manganese ore, rubber, jute, and shellac and was headed for New Orleans, Louisiana.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Eastern Sword was torpedoed and sunk by the U-162, commanded by Kapitänleutnant ürgen Wattenberg, about twelve miles off the Georgetown Light, , British Guiana in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 16 died and 13 survived. The 3,785 ton Eastern Sword was carrying general cargo and was headed for Georgetown.  
   
  The British sailing ship Florence M. Douglas was sunk by gunfire by the U-162 off the coast of British Guiana.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Norlindo was torpedoed and sunk by the U-507, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Harro Schacht, about 80 miles northwest of Dry Tortugas Island in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 23 survivors were picked up by the Panamanian steam merchant San Blas. The 2,686 ton Norlindo was carrying ballast and was headed for Havana, Cuba.  
   
  Dispersed from convoy ON-87 the British steam tanker Eclipse was torpedoed and damaged by the U-564, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Reinhard Suhren, off Fort Lauderdale, Florida in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 45 survived. The 9,767 ton Eclipse was carrying ballast and was bound for Port Arthur, Texas.  
   
  Tuesday, May 5, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Stanbank was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Winter, northeast of Bermuda in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 9 died and 39 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Rhexenor. The 5,966 ton Stanbank was carrying military stores and was headed for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  The unescorted Canadian steam passenger ship Lady Drake was torpedoed and sunk by the U-106, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hermann Rasch, about 90 miles north of Bermuda in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 12 died and 256 survivors were picked up by the minesweeper USS Owl (AM 2). The 7,985 ton Lady Drake was carrying passengers and was headed for St. Johns, Newfoundland.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American Steam merchant Afoundria was torpedoed and sunk by the U-108, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Klaus Scholtz, eight miles north of Le Male Light, Haiti in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, all 46 survived. The 5,010 ton Afoundria was carrying general cargo, including bombs, dynamite, food, lumber, and road-building machinery and was headed for San Juan, Puerto Rico.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker Joseph M. Cudahy was torpedoed and sunk by the U-507, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Harro Schacht, approximately 125 miles west of Naples, Florida in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, 27 died and 10 survivors were picked up by PBYs. The 6,950 ton Joseph M. Cudahy was carrying crude and lubricating oils and was headed for Marcus Hook, Pennsylvania.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker Munger T. Ball was torpedoed and sunk by the U-507 approximately 80 miles northwest of Dry Tortugas Island in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 30 died and 4 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian motor tanker Katy. The 5,104 ton Munger T. Ball was carrying gasoline and was headed for Norfolk, Virginia.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Delisle was torpedoed and damaged by the U-564, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Reinhard Suhren, approximately 15 miles off Jupiter Inlet, Florida in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 36 survived. The 3,478 ton Delisle was carrying general cargo, including a deck cargo of camouflage paint in steel drums and was bound for San Juan, Puerto Rico.  
   
  Wednesday, May 6, 1942  
  The unescorted Latvian steam merchant Abgara was torpedoed and sunk by the U-108, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Klaus Scholtz, 15 miles southeast of Great Inagua Island, Bahamas in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 34 survived. The 4,422 ton Abgara was carrying sugar and was headed for Montreal, Canada.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Empire Buffalo was torpedoed and sunk by the U-125, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Folkers, west of the Cayman Islands in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 13 died and 29 survivors were picked up by the American merchant Cacique. The 6,404 ton Empire Buffalo was carrying ballast and was headed for New Orleans, New Orleans.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American motor merchant Green Island was torpedoed and sunk by the U-125, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Folkers, about 80 miles southwest of Grand Cayman Island in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, all 22 survived and were picked up by the British steam merchant Fort Qu´Appelle. The 1,946 ton Green Island was carrying general cargo and was headed for Aruba.  
   
  The unescorted Dutch steam merchant Amazone was torpedoed and sunk by the U-333, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Peter-Erich Cremer, off Miami, Florida in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and 11 survivors were picked up by the submarine chaser USS PC-484. The 1,294 ton Amazone was carrying general cargo, mainly coffee and oil and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker Halsey was torpedoed and sunk by the U-333 off Jupiter Inlet, Florida. Of the ship’s complement, all 32 survived and were picked up by the two fishing vessels. The 7,088 ton Halsey was carrying naphtha and heating oil and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Alcoa Puritan was shelled and then torpedoed and sunk by the U-507, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Harro Schacht, about 15 miles off the entrance to the Mississippi River in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, all 54 survived and were picked up by the U.S. Coast Guard cutter USS Boutwell (WPC 130). The 6,759 ton Alcoa Puritan was carrying bauxite and was headed for Mobile, Alabama.  
   
  The unescorted American steam tanker Java Arrow was torpedoed and damaged by the U-333, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Peter-Erich Cremer, eight miles off Vero Beach, Florida in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 45 survived. The 8,327 ton Java Arrow was carrying water ballast and drums of lube oil and was bound for Capetown, South Africa.  
   
  Thursday, May 7, 1942  
  The unescorted Norwegian steam merchant Frank Seamans was torpedoed and sunk by the U-162, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jürgen Wattenberg, off the northeast coast of South America in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 27 survived and were picked up by a Dutch ship. The 4,271 ton Frank Seamans was carrying bauxite and was headed for Trinidad.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed Honduran steam merchant Ontario was sunk by gunfire by the U-507, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Harro Schacht, in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, all 45 survived and were picked up by the patrol yacht USS Onyx (PYc 5). The 3,099 ton Ontario was carrying bananas and was headed for Mobile, Alabama.  
   
  Friday, May 8, 1942  
  The 300 ton Canadian sailing ship Mildred Pauline was sunk by gunfire by the U-136, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Zimmermann, off Nova Scotia in the western Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 7 died.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian steam merchant Torny was torpedoed and sunk by the U-507, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Harro Schacht, in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 24survivors were picked up by two seaplanes. The 2,424 ton Torny was carrying nitrate and was headed for Panama City, Florida.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Ohioan was torpedoed and sunk by the U-564, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Reinhard Suhren, about 10 miles off Boynton Beach, Florida. Of the ship’s complement, 15 died and 22 survivors were picked up by the U.S. Coast Guard. The 6,078 ton Ohioan was carrying manganese ore, wool, and licorice root and was headed for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  
   
  Saturday, May 9, 1942  
  The unescorted Canadian motor tanker Calgarolite was torpedoed and then sunk by gunfire by the U-125, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Folkers, about 50 miles southwest of Grand Cayman Island in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, all 45 survived reached land by lifeboat. The 11,941 ton Calgarolite was carrying ballast and was headed for Cartagena, Colombia.  
   
  The unescorted Canadian steam merchant Mont Louis was torpedoed and sunk by the U-162, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jürgen Wattenberg, southwest of Trinidad in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 13 died and 8 survivors were picked up by the Canadian sailing ship Mona Marie. The 1,905 ton Mont Louis was carrying bauxite and was headed for Trinidad.  
   
  The unescorted Panamanian motor tanker Lubrafol was torpedoed and sunk by the U-564, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Reinhard Suhren, about 3.5 miles off Hillsboro Inlet, Florida in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 13 died and 31 survivors were picked up by the two U.S. Coast Guard boats. The 7,138 ton Lubrafol was carrying heating oil and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Greylock was torpedoed and damaged by the U-588, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Viktor Vogel, outside Halifax Harbor in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. The TON ton Greylock was carrying general cargo and was bound for the Soviet Union.  
   
  Sunday, May 10, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Clan Skene was torpedoed and sunk by the U-333, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Peter-Erich Cremer, about 300 miles southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 9 died and 73 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS McKean (APD 5). The 5,214 ton Clan Skene was carrying chrome ore and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Kitty´s Brook was torpedoed and sunk by the U-588, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Victor Vogel, about 35 miles southeast of Cape Sable, Nova Scotia in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 9 died and 25 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The U-588 ton Kitty´s Brook was carrying U.S. Army stores and trucks as deck cargo and was headed for Argentia, Newfoundland.  
   
  The unescorted American motor tanker Aurora was torpedoed and damaged by the U-506, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erich Würdemann, approximately 40 miles off Southwest Pass, Louisiana in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 49 survived. The 7,050 ton Aurora was carrying water ballast and was bound for Beaumont, Texas.  
   
  Monday, May 11, 1942  
  The unescorted British motor merchant Cape of Good Hope was torpedoed and then sunk by gunfire by the U-502, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jürgen von Rosenstiel, northeast of the Virgin Islands in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 37 survived reached land by lifeboat. The 4,963 ton Cape of Good Hope was carrying general and military cargo and was headed for Abadan, Iran.  
   
  Tuesday, May 12, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-92, the British steam merchant Cristales was torpedoed and sunk by the U-124, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Johann Mohr, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 82 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMCS Shediac. The 5,389 ton Cristales was carrying general cargo and china clay and was headed for Montreal, Canada.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-92, the British steam merchant Llanover was torpedoed and sunk by the U-124 southeast of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, all 46 survived and were picked up by the British rescue ship Bury. The 4,959 ton Llanover was carrying coal and was headed for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-92, the Greek steam merchant Mount Parnes was torpedoed and sunk by the U-124, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Johann Mohr, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 33 survived. The 4,371 ton Mount Parnes was carrying coal and was headed for Montreal, Canada.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American turbine tanker Virginia was torpedoed and sunk by the U-507, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Harro Schacht, off the entrance to Southwest Pass, Mississippi River in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, 27 died and 14 survivors were picked up by the PT-157. The 10,731 ton Virginia was carrying gasoline and was headed for Baton Rouge, Louisiana.  
   
  The unescorted Dutch steam merchant Leto was torpedoed and sunk by the U-553, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Karl Thurmann, about eight miles north of Cape de la Madeleine at the entrance to the St. Lawrence River in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 12 died and 41 survived. The 4,712 ton Leto was carrying grain and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Nicoya was torpedoed and sunk by the U-553, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Karl Thurmann, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence south of Anticosti Island in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 82 survived. The 5,364 ton Nicoya was carrying general cargo, including aircraft and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian motor tanker Lise was torpedoed and then sunk by gunfire by the U-69, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Ulrich Gräf, off the coast of South America in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 12 died and 21 survived. The 6,826 ton Lise was carrying ballast and was headed for Curaçao.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-92, the Panamanian steam merchant Cocle was torpedoed and sunk by the U-94, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Otto Ites, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 37 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Bury. The 5,630 ton Cocle was carrying general cargo and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Wednesday, May 13, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy SL-109, the British steam merchant Denpark was torpedoed and sunk by the U-128, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Heyse, about 300 miles northwest of the Cape Verde Islands in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 21 died and 25 survivors were picked up by the Danish merchant Nordlys and the British merchant City of Windsor. The 3,491 ton Denpark was carrying manganese ore and was headed for Workington, England.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant City of Melbourne was torpedoed and sunk by the U-156, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Hartenstein, west of Barbados in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 86 survived. The 6,630 ton City of Melbourne was carrying general cargo and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted Dutch motor merchant Koenjit was torpedoed and sunk by the U-156 approximately 300 miles north-northeast of Barbados. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 86 survived. Of the ship’s complement, all 37 survived. The 4,551 ton Koenjit was carrying general cargo and a motor boat as deck cargo and was headed for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  The unescorted American steam tanker Esso Houston was torpedoed and sunk by the U-162, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jürgen Wattenberg, about 150 miles east of Barbados in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 41 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian motor tanker Havprins or reached land by lifeboat. The 7,699 ton Esso Houston was carrying fuel oil and was headed for Montevideo, Uruguay.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker Gulfpenn was torpedoed and sunk by the U-506, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erich Würdemann, about 30 miles off the entrance to the Mississippi River in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, 13 died and 25 survivors were picked up by the Honduran steam merchant Telde. The 8,862 ton Gulfpenn was carrying fuel oil and was headed for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Norlantic was sunk by gunfire by the U-69, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Ulrich Gräf, 90 miles east of Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 22 survivors were picked up by the merchant Marpesia. The 2,606 ton Norlantic was carrying general cargo, including cement, steel, and iron pipes and was headed for Puerto La Cruz, Venezuela.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-92, the British steam merchant Batna was torpedoed and sunk by the U-94, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Otto Ites, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 41 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Bury. The 4,399 ton Batna was carrying coal and was headed for Nova Scotia.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-92, the Swedish steam merchant Tolken was torpedoed and sunk by the U-94 southeast of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, all 34 survived and were picked up by the British rescue ship Bury. The 4,471 ton Tolken was carrying ballast and was headed for Wabana, Newfoundland.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker Gulfprince was torpedoed and damaged by the U-507, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erich Würdemann, approximately six miles south of the Ship Shoals Sea Buoy, Louisiana. The 6,561 ton Gulfprince was carrying crude oil and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Thursday, May 14, 1942  
  The unescorted Honduran steam merchant Comayagua was torpedoed and sunk by the U-125, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Folkers, about 14 miles west by south of Georgetown, Grand Cayman the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 35 survivors were picked up by the motor schooner Cimboco. The 2,493 ton Comayagua was carrying ballast and was headed for Niquero, Cuba.  
   
  The unescorted Belgian motor merchant Brabant was torpedoed and sunk by the U-155, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Adolf Cornelius Piening, off the coast of South America in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 34 survived. The 2,483 ton Brabant was carrying ballast and was headed for Curaçao.  
   
  The unescorted British steam tanker British Colony was torpedoed and sunk by the U-162, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jürgen Wattenberg, 90 miles northeast of Bridgetown, Barbados in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 43 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 6,917 ton British Colony was carrying Admiralty fuel oil and was headed for Gibraltar.  
   
  The unescorted American steam tanker David McKelvy was torpedoed and damaged by the U-506, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erich Würdemann, about 35 miles south of the mouth of the Mississippi River in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, 17 died and 25 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian motor tanker Norsol. The 6,821 ton David McKelvy was carrying crude oil and was headed for Bayonne, New Jersey. A salvage crew reboarded the burned out tanker on May 29, 1942. After beaching on the coast of Louisiana, she was declared a total loss.  
   
  The unescorted and neutral Mexican steam tanker Potrero del Llano was torpedoed and sunk by the U-564, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Reinhard Suhren, east of Cape Florida in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 13 died and 22 survivors were picked up by the patrol vessel USS PC-536. The 4,000 ton Potrero del Llano was carrying petroleum and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted Greek Steam merchant Stavros was torpedoed and damaged by the U-593, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Gerd Kelbling, off the east coast of the United States in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 33 survived.  
   
  Friday, May 15, 1942  
  The unescorted Norwegian motor merchant Siljestad was torpedoed and sunk by the U-156, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Hartenstein, about 420 miles northeast of Barbados in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 31 survived were picked up by the Yugoslavian steam merchant Kupa. The Kupa would be sunk a short time later. The 4,301 ton Siljestad was carrying general cargo and war material and was headed for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  The Yugoslavian steam merchant Kupa was torpedoed and sunk by the U-156 off the coast of South America. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 70 survived. The 4,382 ton Kupa was carrying military trucks, aircraft parts and oil in drums and was headed for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  German planes bombed Allied shipping at Murmansk. The U.S. freighter Yaka suffered a direct hit that caused extensive damage but no casualties to the 38-man merchant crew or the 11-man Armed Guard. The ship was beached to prevent loss. The Yaka would be refloated and left in convoy QP-13 for New York, New York in on July 6.  
   
  Saturday, May 16, 1942  
  The unescorted and unarmed Honduran steam merchant Amapala was sunk by gunfire by the U-507, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Harro Schacht, in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 56 survivors were picked up by the fishing schooner Gonzalez. The 4,148 ton Amapala was carrying general cargo and was headed for La Ceiba, Honduras.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Nicarao was torpedoed and sunk by the U-751, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Gerhard Bigalk, north of San Salvador, Bahamas in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 31 survivors were picked up by the American motor tanker Esso Augusta. The 1,445 ton Nicarao was carrying fruit, bananas, coconuts, and charcoal and was headed for Jacksonville, Florida.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American motor tanker Sun was torpedoed and damaged by the U-506, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erich Würdemann, near Southwest Pass, Louisiana in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, all 42 survived. The 9,002 ton Sun was carrying water ballast and was bound for Beaumont, Texas.  
   
  The unescorted American motor tanker William C. McTarnahan was torpedoed and damaged by the U-506 approximately 35 miles east of the Ship Shoal Light, Louisiana. Of the ship’s complement, 18 died and 27 survived. The 7,306 ton William C. McTarnahan was carrying water ballast and was bound for Port Isabel, Texas.  
   
  Sunday, May 17, 1942  
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Ruth Lykes was sunk by gunfire by the U-103, commanded by Kapitänleutnant U-103, off Cape Falso, Nicaragua in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 26 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian motor merchant Somerville. The 2,612 ton Ruth Lykes was carrying coffee and was headed for Houston, Texas.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Fort Qu´Appelle was torpedoed and sunk by the U-135, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Friedrich-Hermann Praetorius, north of Bermuda in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and 11 survivors were picked up by the minesweeper HMCS Melville (J 263). The 7,127 ton ort Qu´Appelle was carrying general cargo, including acetone and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The American motor merchant Challenger was torpedoed and sunk by the U-155, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Adolf Cornelius Piening, 25 miles east of Granada in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 56 survivors were picked up by the armed yacht USS Turquoise (PY 18). The 7,667 ton Challenger was carrying general cargo and was headed for Bombay, India.  
   
  The unescorted British motor tanker San Victorio was torpedoed and sunk by the U-155 sank southwest of Grenada. Of the ship’s complement, 52 died and 1 survivor were picked up by the armed yacht USS Turquoise (PY 18). The 8,136 ton San Victorio was carrying benzine and paraffin and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Barrdale was torpedoed and sunk by the U-156, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Hartenstein, east of Martinique in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 52 survivors were picked up by the Argentinean motor passenger ship Rio Iguazi. The 5,072 ton Barrdale was carrying government and general cargo and was headed for Abadan, Iran.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam trawler 324 ton Foam was sunk by gunfire by the U-432, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz-Otto Schultze, about 85 miles south of Halifax, Nova Scotia in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 20 survivors were picked up by a Canadian patrol boat and the corvette HMCS Halifax (K 237).  
   
  The unescorted American steam tanker Gulfoil was torpedoed and sunk by the U-506, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erich Würdemann, about 75 miles southwest of the Mississippi River Delta in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, 21 died and 19 survivors were picked up by the American steam tanker Benjamin Brewster. The 5,189 ton Gulfoil was carrying diesel oil, gas enrichment and bunker oil and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian steam merchant Skottland was torpedoed and sunk by the U-588, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Victor Vogel, about 20 miles west-southwest of Cape Sable, Nova Scotia in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 23 survivors were picked up by the Canadian lobster boat O.K. Servise 4. The 2,117 ton Skottland was carrying lumber and was headed for London, England.  
   
  The unescorted British motor merchant Peisander was torpedoed and sunk by the U-653, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Gerhard Feiler, about 350 miles southeast of Nantucket Island in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 65 survived and were picked up by the patrol vessel USCGC General Greene (WPC 140). The 6,225 ton Peisander was carrying wheat, tungsten, and wool and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Monday, May 18, 1942  
  The unescorted and unarmed American motor tanker Mercury Sun was torpedoed and sunk by the U-125, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Folkers, about 125 miles south of Cape Corrientes, Cuba in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 29 survivors were picked up by the American steam merchant Howard. The 8,893 ton Mercury Sun was carrying Navy fuel oil and was headed for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant William J. Salman was torpedoed and sunk by the U-125 approximately 125 miles south of Cape Frances, Cuba. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 22 survivors were picked up by the Latvian steam merchant Kegums. The 2,616 ton William J. Salman was carrying building material and was headed for Antigua.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Quaker City was torpedoed and sunk by the U-156, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Hartenstein, about 300 miles east of Barbados in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 11 died and 29 survivors reached land by lifeboat/. The 4,961 ton Quaker City was carrying manganese ore and was headed for Norfolk, Virginia.  
   
  The Norwegian motor tanker Beth was torpedoed and sunk by the U-162, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jürgen Wattenberg, in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 30 survivors reached land by lifeboat/. The 6,852 ton Beth was carrying fuel oil and was headed for Freetown, Sierra Leone.  
   
  The unescorted Dutch steam merchant Fauna was torpedoed and sunk by the U-558, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Krech, in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 27 survived. The 1,254 ton Fauna was carrying general cargo and was headed for Turks Island, Bahamas.  
   
  The U.S. freighter Deer Lodge, anchored in Kola Inlet, Soviet Union was bombed by German planes and damaged by near-misses. There were no casualties among the 34-man merchant complement or among the 11-man Armed Guard sailors, and the ship was moved to another anchorage.  
   
  Tuesday, May 19, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam merchant Ogontz was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Winter, about 70 miles southeast of Cozumel Island off Yucatan in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 19 died and 22 survivors were picked up by the American steam tanker Esso Dover. The 5,037 ton Ogontz was carrying nitrate and was headed for Panama City, Florida.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Heredia was torpedoed and sunk by the U-506, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erich Würdemann, wo miles southeast of the Ship Shoal Buoy, Louisiana in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, 36 died and 26 survivors were picked up by the four shrimp trawlers and a seaplane. The 4,732 ton Heredia was carrying bananas and coffee and was headed for New Orleans, Louisiana.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Isabela was torpedoed and sunk by the U-751, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Gerhard Bigalk, 35 miles south of Navassa Island Lighthouse in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 34 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 3,110 ton Isabela was carrying general cargo and cars as deck cargo and was headed for San Juan, Puerto Rico.  
   
  Wednesday, May 20, 1942  
  Dispersed from Convoy ON-93, the Norwegian motor tanker Norland was torpedoed and then sunk by gunfire by the U-108, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Klaus Scholtz, in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 48 survived and were picked up by the Dutch motor merchant Polyphemus. The 8,134 ton Norland was carrying ballast and was headed for Corpus Christi, Texas.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OT-1, the Panamanian steam tanker Sylvan Arrow was torpedoed and sunk by the U-155, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Adolf Cornelius Piening, off the coast of South America in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 43 survived. The 7,797 ton Sylvan Arrow was carrying Bunker C oil and was headed for Capetown, South Africa.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy ON-93, the British motor tanker Darina was torpedoed and sunk by the U-158, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erwin Rostin, about 500 miles east-southeast of Bermuda in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 50 survivors were picked up by the British tanker British Ardour, the American merchant Exanthia, and the Norwegian merchant Dagrun. The 8,113 ton Darina was carrying ballast and was headed for Texas City, Texas.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker Halo was torpedoed and sunk by the U-506, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erich Würdemann, about 50 miles from the Southwest Pass of the Mississippi River in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, 39 died and 3 survived. The 6,986 ton Halo was carrying crude oil and was headed for New Orleans, Louisiana.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant George Calvert was torpedoed and sunk by the U-753, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Alfred Manhardt von Mannstein, about 50 miles off the northwest coast of Cuba in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 48 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 7,191 ton George Calvert was carrying general cargo and was headed for Bandar Shahpur, Iran.  
   
  Thursday, May 21, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam merchant Clare was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Winter, approximately 40 miles off the coast of Cuba in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, all 40 survived. The 3,372 ton Clare was carrying general cargo and was headed for San Juan, Puerto Rico.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Elizabeth was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Winter, approximately 30 miles south of Cape Corrientes, Cuba. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 36 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 4,727 ton Elizabeth was carrying general cargo, including 40 U.S. Army trucks and construction material and was headed for San Juan, Puerto Rico.  
   
  The unescorted and neutral Mexican steam tanker Faja de Oro was torpedoed and sunk by the U-106, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hermann Rasch, off Key West, Florida in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 10 died and 27 survived. The 6,067 ton Faja de Oro was carrying ballast and was headed for Tampico, Mexico.  
   
  The unescorted Dominican steam merchant Presidente Trujillo was torpedoed and sunk by the U-156, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Hartenstein, just after leaving Fort de France, Martinique in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 24 died and 15 survived. The 1,668 ton Presidente Trujillo was carrying general cargo, including beer, machinery, and forage and was headed for San Juan, Puerto Rico.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OS-28, the British fleet oiler Montenol was torpedoed and sunk by the U-159, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Witte, approximately 140 miles east-southeast of Santa Maria, Azores in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 61 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Wellington (L 65). The 2,646 ton Montenol was carrying ballast and was headed for Freetown, Sierra Leone.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy OS-28, the steam merchant New Brunswick was torpedoed and sunk by the U-159 approximately 140 miles east-southeast of Santa Maria, Azores. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 59 survived. The 6,529 ton New Brunswick was carrying general cargo and government stores, including 20 RAF aircraft and was headed for Lagos, Nigeria.  
   
  The unescorted Canadian steam merchant Troisdoc was sunk by gunfire by the U-558, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Krech, about 40 miles northwest of Jamaica in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, all 18 survived and were picked up by the U.S. Coast Guard cutter USS Mohawk (WPG 78). The 1,925 ton Troisdoc was carrying general cargo, including cement and was headed for Georgetown, British Guiana.  
   
  The unescorted Canadian steam merchant Torondoc was torpedoed and sunk by the U-69, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Ulrich Gräf, about 60 miles northwest of Martinique in the Caribbean. All of the ship’s complement of 21 died. The 1,927 ton Torondoc was carrying bauxite and was headed for Trinidad.  
   
  Friday, May 22, 1942  
  The unescorted Canadian steam merchant Frank B. Baird was sunk by gunfire by the U-158, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erwin Rostin, east-southeast of Bermuda in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 23 survived and were picked up by the Norwegian merchant Talisman. The 1,748 ton Frank B. Baird was carrying bauxite and was headed for Sydney, Nova Scotia.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Plow City was torpedoed and sunk by the U-588, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Victor Vogel, about 200 miles off Cape May, New Jersey in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 30 survivors were picked up by the patrol yacht USS Sapphire (PYc 2). The 3,282 ton Plow City was carrying bauxite ore and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The British sailing ship E.P. Theriault was stopped with gunfire by the U-753, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Alfred M. von Mannstein, in the Gulf of Mexico. Demolition charges were placed on board and the vessel was heavily damaged but did not sink. The 326 ton E.P. Theriault was carrying pitch pine and was bound for Kingston, Jamaica.  
   
  Saturday, May 23, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam tanker Samuel Q. Brown was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Winter, about 100 miles south of Cape Corrientes, Cuba in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 53 survivors were picked up by a U.S. Navy patrol plane and the destroyer USS Goff (DD 247). The 6,625 ton Samuel Q. Brown was carrying fuel oil and was headed for Honolulu, Hawaii.  
   
  The unescorted Panamanian steam merchant Watsonville was torpedoed and sunk by the U-155, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Adolf Cornelius Piening, in the St. Vincent passage in the Caribbean. The 2,220 ton Watsonville was carrying general cargo and was headed for Trinidad.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Zurichmoor was torpedoed and sunk by the U-432, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz-Otto Schultze, east of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the western Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 45 died. The 4,455 ton Zurichmoor was carrying Ballast and was headed for St .Thomas, Virgin Islands.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Margot was torpedoed and sunk by the U-588, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Victor Vogel, southeast of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 44 survivors were picked up by the Swedish motor merchant Sagoland. The 4,545 ton Margot was carrying general cargo and military stores, including aircraft parts, tanks, and explosives and was headed for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed 7,061 ton American steam tanker William Boyce Thompson was torpedoed and damaged by the U-558 approximately 120 miles south of Kingston, Jamaica in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, passengers, and armed guards, all 39 survived.  
   
  Sunday, May 24, 1942  
  The unescorted Dutch motor merchant Hector was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Winter, 60 miles northwest of the Grand Cayman Island in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 29 survivors were picked up by the American tanker F.Q. Barstow. The 1,828 ton Hector was carrying general cargo and was headed for Curaçao.  
   
  The unescorted and neutral Brazilian steam merchant Gonçalves Dias was torpedoed and sunk by the U-502, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jürgen von Rosenstiel, sank about 100 miles south of Ciudad Trujillo, Santo Domingo. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 39 survived. The 4,996 ton Gonçalves Dias was carrying general cargo, including coffee and was headed for New Orleans, Louisiana.  
   
  Monday, May 25, 1942  
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Beatrice was torpedoed and then sunk by gunfire by the U-558, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Krech, in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 30 survivors were picked up by the patrol boat HMS Hauken or reached land by lifeboat. The 3,451 ton Beatrice was carrying raw sugar and was headed for Pensacola, Florida.  
   
  The Panamanian Motor tanker Persephone was torpedoed and damaged beyond repair by the U-593, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Gerd Kelbling, off Barnegat Light, New Jersey in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 9 died and 28 survivors were picked up by the U.S. Coast Guard. The 8,426 ton Persephone was carrying crude oil and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The Norwegian motor tanker Haakon Hauan was torpedoed and damaged by the U-753, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Alfred M. von Mannstein, in the Gulf of Mexico. The 6,582 ton Haakon Hauan was carrying ballast and was bound for Galveston, Texas.  
   
  German planes attacked convoy PQ 16 as it proceeded toward Murmansk, Soviet Union, from Reykjavik, Iceland, The U.S. freighter Carlton was damaged by near-misses. She left the convoy under tow of ASW trawler HMS Northern Spray (FY 129). There were no casualties among the Carlton's 35-man merchant crew or 11-man Armed Guard.  
   
  Tuesday, May 26, 1942  
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Alcoa Carrier was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Winter, about 125 miles west-northwest of Montego Bay, Jamaica in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, all 35 survived and were picked up by a Cuban gunboat and an aircraft of the U.S. Navy. The 5,588 ton Alcoa Carrier was carrying general cargo and was headed for Kingston, Jamaica.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker Carrabulle was shelled and then torpedoed and sunk by the U-106, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hermann Rasch, in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, 22 died and 18 survivors were picked up by the American steam merchant Thompson Lykes. The 5,030 ton Carrabulle was carrying liquid asphalt and was headed for San Juan, Puerto Rico.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy PQ-16, the American steam merchant Syros was torpedoed and sunk by the U-703, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz Bielfeld, about 200 miles southwest of Bear Island, Norway in the far northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 11 died and 28 survivors were picked up by the Asw trawler HMS Lady Madeleine (FY 283) and the corvette FFL Roselys (K 57). The 6,191 ton Syros was carrying general war cargo, including ammunition and was headed for Murmansk, Soviet Union.  
   
  German planes attack the Reykjavik, Iceland-bound U.S. freighter Carlton which was detached from convoy PQ 16 for repairs after being damaged by German attacks the previous day, under tow of ASW trawler HMS Northern Spray (FY 129), but caused no additional damage. As in the previous day's attack, there were no casualties.  
   
  Wednesday, May 27, 1942  
  Dispersed from Convoy OS-28, the British motor tanker Athelknight was torpedoed and then sunk by gunfire by the U-172, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Carl Emmermann, southeast of Bermuda in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 9 died and 43 survivors were picked up by the British merchant Empire Austin or reached land by lifeboat, both sets of survivors having been at sea for nearly a month. The 8,940 ton Athelknight was carrying ballast and was headed for Curaçao.  
   
  The unescorted American army transport Jack was torpedoed and sunk by the U-558, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Krech, about 100 miles southwest of Port Salut, Haiti in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 37 died and 23 survived. The 2,622 ton Jack was carrying bags of sugar and was headed for New Orleans, Louisiana.  
   
  The unescorted Dutch motor merchant Polyphemus was torpedoed and sunk by the U-578, commanded by Fregattenkapitän Ernst-August Rehwinkel, about 340 miles north of Bermuda in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 15 died and 60 survived. The 6,269 ton Polyphemus was carrying wheat and wool and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian motor tanker Hamlet was torpedoed and sunk by the U-753, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Alfred Manhardt von Mannstein, in the Gulf of Mexico south of Louisiana. Of the ship’s complement, all 36 survived and were picked up by some fishing vessels. The 6,578 ton Hamlet was carrying crude oil and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Atenas was torpedoed and damaged by the U-106, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hermann Rasch, approximately 175 miles south of the entrance to the Mississippi River in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, all 72 survived. The 4,639 ton Atenas was carrying general cargo and was bound for Cristobal.  
   
  Thursday, May 28, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam tanker New Jersey was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Winter, about 90 miles southwest of Grand Cayman Island in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, all 42 survived and were picked up by the destroyer USS Tattnall (DD 125). The 6,414 ton New Jersey was carrying water ballast and was headed for Aruba.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Mentor was torpedoed and sunk by the U-106, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hermann Rasch, north of Cabo Catoche, Mexico in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 82 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Antilochus. The 7,383 ton Mentor was carrying war material, supplies, and sulfur and was headed for Bombay, India.  
   
  The unescorted Dutch steam merchant Poseidon was torpedoed and sunk by the U-155, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Adolf Cornelius Piening, near Barbados in the western Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 32 died. The 1,928 ton Poseidon was carrying ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Alcoa Pilgrim was torpedoed and sunk by the U-502, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jürgen von Rosenstiel, about 150 miles south of the Mona Passage in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 31 died and 9 survivors were picked up by the American steam merchant Thomas Nelson. The 6,759 ton Alcoa Pilgrim was carrying bauxite ore and was headed for Mobile, Alabama.  
   
  The British steam merchant Yorkmoor was sunk by gunfire by the U-506, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erich Würdemann, north-northeast of the Bahamas. Of the ship’s complement, all 46 survived and were picked up by a U.S. Coast Guard cutter. The 4,457 ton Yorkmoor was carrying bauxite and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Friday, May 29, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Western Head was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Harald Gelhaus, in the Windward Passage 50 miles east of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 24 died and 6 survivors were picked up by a U.S. Navy patrol ship. The 2,599 ton Western Head was carrying sugar and was headed for Sydney, Nova Scotia.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Norman Prince was torpedoed and sunk by the U-156, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Hartenstein, about 60 miles west of St. Lucia in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 16 died and 33 survivors were picked up by the French merchant Angouleme and the U.S. Coast Guard cutter USS Unalga. The 1,913 ton Norman Prince was carrying ballast and was headed for St. Lucia.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Allister was torpedoed and sunk by the U-504, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans-Georg Friedrich Poske, about 50 miles south of Grand Cayman Island in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 15 died and 8 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 1,597 ton Allister was carrying bananas and was headed for Tampa, Florida.  
   
  Saturday, May 30, 1942  
  The unescorted Norwegian motor merchant Baghdad was torpedoed and sunk by the U-155, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Adolf Cornelius Piening, east of Martinique in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, 9 died and 21 survived. The 2,161 ton Baghdad was carrying general cargo and mail and was headed for Pernambuco, Brazil.  
   
  The American steam merchant Alcoa Shipper was torpedoed and sunk by the U-404, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto von Bülow, about 500 miles east of Cape Charles, Virginia in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 25 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian steam merchant Margrethe Bakke. The 5,491 ton Alcoa Shipper was carrying bauxite ore and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Sunday, May 31, 1942  
  The unescorted Canadian steam merchant Liverpool Packet was torpedoed and sunk by the U-432, commanded by Kapitänleutnant einz-Otto Schultze, 15 miles west of Seal Island, Nova Scotia in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 19 survivors were picked up by the reached land by lifeboat. The 1,188 ton Liverpool Packet was carrying U.S. government stores and was headed for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Fred W. Green was sunk by gunfire by the U-506, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erich Würdemann, about 200 miles southeast of Bermuda in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 36 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS Ludlow (DD 438). The 2,292 ton Fred W. Green was carrying government stores and general cargo, including motor trucks, and ballast and was headed for Freetown, Sierra Leone.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  Friday, May 1, 1942  
  The Naval Base and Naval Auxiliary Air Facility, Great Exuma, Bahama Islands, and Naval Base, Grand Cayman, British West Indies, were established.  
   
  Monday, May 4, 1942  
  Commander in Chief U.S. Fleet Admiral Ernest J. King directed the Coast Guard Auxiliary to organize civilian small craft as coastal pickets.  
   
  Sunday, May 10, 1942  
  The aircraft carrier USS Ranger (CV 4) in U.S. Navy Task Force 36 launched 68 USAAF P-40 Warhawks fighters off Accra, Gold Coast of Africa. The USS Ranger had transported them from Naval Air Station Quonset Point, Rhode Island.  
   
  Wednesday, May 13, 1942  
  Vichy France agreed to immobilize the aircraft carrier Béarn, light cruiser Emile Bertin, and training cruiser Jeanne D'Arc at Martinique, French West Indies.  
     
   
     
   
 

The objective of WW2Timelines.com is to provide a day by day account of the events that lead up to and were part of the greatest conflict known to mankind. There are accounts for the activities of each particular day and timelines for subjects and personalities. It is the of this website intent to provide an unbiased account of the war. Analysis, effects caused by an event, or prior or subsequent pertinent events are presented separately and indicated as text that is italicized.

 
   
  Copyright 2011
WW2timelines.com
Contact us using our email page