June 1942 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
  Overview  
  1 Allied warship was sunk by a U-boat.  
  3 Allied warships were sunk German warships.  
  2 Allied auxiliary warships were sunk by U-boats.  
  1 Allied warship was damaged by a U-boat.  
  1 Allied warship was sunk by a mine.  
  1 Allied warship was damaged by a mine.  
   
  1 U-boat was sunk by an Allied warship.  
  1 U-boat was sunk by Allied aircraft.  
   
  129 Allied or neutral merchant ships were sunk by U-boats or mines totaling 658,689 tons.  
  9 Allied merchant ships were damaged by U-boats or mines totaling 25,173 tons.  
  1 Allied merchant ship was damaged by German aircraft at Murmansk, Soviet Union.  
  1 Allied merchant ship was sunk by a mine at Murmansk, Soviet Union.  
   
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Sunday, June 7, 1942  
  The small aircraft tender USS Gannet (AVP 8) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-653, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Gerhard Feiler, in the north central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and 62 survivors were picked up by two PBM Mariner aircraft and by the destroyer USS Hamilton (DMS-18).  
   
  Monday, June 8, 1942  
  While sailing through the Norwegian Sea, the aircraft carrier HMS Glorious (77) and her two escorts, the destroyers HMS Acasta (H 09) and HMS Ardent (H 41), were intercepted by the German battlecruisers Scharnhorst and Gneisenau. In the surface action that ensued all three British ships were sunk. The Scharnhorst was badly damaged by a torpedo from Acasta, and both German vessels took a number of 4.7-inch shell hits. The damage to the German ships was sufficient to cause the Germans to retire to Trondheim, which allowed the safe passage of a British evacuation convoy through the area later that day.  
   
  Tuesday, June 9, 1942  
  While escorting Convoy ONS-100 the French corvette FFL Mimosa (J 6254) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-124, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Johann Mohr, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 65 died and 4 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMCS Assiniboine (I 18). The majority of the French sailors that went down with this ship came from the same small community of St. Pierre et Miquelon. The loss of so many of the young men had lasting effects on that community.  
   
  Monday, June 15, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy KN-109, the destroyer USS Bainbridge (DD 246) struck a mine and was damaged off the coast of Virginia, United States.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy KN-109, the anti submarine trawler HMS Kingston Ceylonite (FY 214) struck a mine and sank off Virginia Beach, Virginia. Of the ship’s complement, 18 died and 14 survived.  
   
  Thursday, June 19, 1942  
  The anti submarine trawler USS YP-389 was sunk by gunfire by the U-701, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Horst Degen, off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 21 survived.  
   
  Friday, June 27, 1942  
  Convoy PQ-17 left Hvalfjordur, Iceland for Archangel, Soviet Union. The convoy consisted of 35 ships and was heavily loaded with 297 aircraft, 594 tanks, 4246 lorries and gun carriers and additional 156,000 tons of cargo. This was enough to equip an army of 50,000 men and valued at $700 million at the time. Only 9 of the ships would reach their destination.  
   
  Saturday, June 28, 1942  
  Elements of the British Home Fleet left Scapa Flow to provide distant escort for Convoy PQ-17. The escort included the battleships HMS Duke of York (17) and USS Washington (BB 56) and the aircraft carrier HMS Victorious (38) along with a force of cruisers and destroyers.  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  Saturday, June 13, 1942  
  The U-157, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Wolf Henne, was sunk by depth charges from the U.S. Coast Guard cutter USS Thetis north-east of Havana, Cuba in the Caribbean Sea. All of the ship’s complement of 52 died. During its career the U-157 sank 1 merchant ship for a total of 6,401 tons.  
   
  Tuesday, June 30, 1942  
  The U-158, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erwin Rostin, was sunk by depth charges from a U.S. Mariner aircraft west of the Bermudas in the western Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 54 died. During its career the U-158 sank 17 merchant ships for a total of 101,321 tons and damaged 2 merchant ships for a total of 15,264 tons.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Monday, June 1, 1942  
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Hampton Roads was torpedoed and sunk by the U-106, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hermann Rasch, northwest of Cape San Antonio, Cuba in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 23 survivors were picked up by the American steam merchant Alcoa Pathfinder. The 2,689 ton Hampton Roads was carrying phosphate rock and was headed for San Juan, Puerto Rico.  
   
  The Panamanian steam merchant Bushranger was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Harald Gelhaus, in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 17 died and 26 survivors were picked up by the U.S. Coast Guard cutter USS Nike. The 4,536 ton Bushranger was carrying bauxite and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The neutral Brazilian steam merchant Alegrete was torpedoed and sunk by the U-156, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Werner Hartenstein, between St. Lucia and St. Vincent in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 64 survived and were picked up by the destroyer USS Tarbell (DD 142). The 5,970 ton Alegrete was carrying general cargo, including coffee, cacao, castor oil, and chestnuts and was headed for New Orleans, Louisiana.  
   
  The American steam merchant West Notus was sunk by gunfire by the U-404, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto von Bülow, about 320 miles east of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 36 survivors were picked up by the Greek steam merchant Constantinos H. and the Swiss steam merchant Saentis. The 5,492 ton West Notus was carrying flax seed and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Westmoreland was torpedoed and sunk by the U-566, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Dietrich Borchert, about 240 miles north-northeast of Bermuda in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 65 survivors were picked up by the Canadian steam merchant Cathcart and the American troop transport Henry R. Mallory. The 8,967 ton Westmoreland was carrying general cargo, refrigerated meat and foodstuffs, wool, and mail and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Tuesday, June 2, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam merchant Knoxville City was torpedoed and sunk by the U-158, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erwin Rostin, about 50 miles southeast of Cape Corrientes, Cuba in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 53 survivors were picked up by the Cuban gunboat Donativo. The 5,686 ton Knoxville City was carrying general cargo and was headed for Suez, Egypt.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Illinois was torpedoed and sunk by the U-159, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Witte, about 400 miles northwest of Puerto Rico in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 32 died and 6 survivors were picked up by the American steam tanker Esso Montpelier. The 5,447 ton Illinois was carrying manganese ore and was headed for Baltimore, Maryland.  
   
  The British motor merchant Mattawin was torpedoed and sunk by the U-553, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Karl Thurmann, southeast of New York in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 71 survived and were picked up by the the Norwegian steam merchant Torvanger and the patrol vessel USCGC General Greene (WPC 140). The 6,919 ton Mattawin was carrying military stores and was headed for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  The unescorted Dutch steam merchant Triton was sunk by gunfire by the U-558, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Krech, about 470 miles southeast of Bermuda in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 30 survivors were picked up by the American steam merchant Mormack Port. The 2,078 ton Triton was carrying bauxite and timber and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  After being missed by the U-213 the unescorted Norwegian motor merchant Berganger was torpedoed and sunk by the U-578, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Ernst-August Rehwinkel, southeast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 43 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian motor merchant Bañaderos, the destroyer USS Madison (DD 425) and the American fishing vessel Mary J. Landry. The 6,826 ton Berganger was carrying general cargo, including coffee, linters, sunflower seed oil, and hides and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The U.S. freighter Domino was machine-gunned by an unidentified submarine off Nuevitas, Cuba. The ship suffered no casualties.  
   
  Wednesday, June 3, 1942  
  The unescorted Norwegian motor tanker Høegh Giant was torpedoed and sunk by the U-126, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Bauer, about 400 miles east of Guiana in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 39 survived. The 10,990 ton Høegh Giant was carrying ballast and was headed for Trinidad.  
   
  The British schooner Lillian was sunk by gunfire by the U-156, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Werner Hartenstein, off the coast of South America in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 3 died and 22 survived. The 80 ton Lillian was carrying passengers and rum and was headed for Trinidad.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant City of Alma was torpedoed and sunk by the U-172, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Carl Emmermann, about 400 miles northeast of San Juan, Puerto Rico in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 29 died and 10 survivors were picked up by the patrol boat USS YP-67. The 5,446 ton City of Alma was carrying manganese ore and was headed for Baltimore, Maryland.  
   
  The unescorted Swedish steam merchant Anna was sunk by gunfire after two torpedoes missed by the U-404, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto von Bülow, in the western Atlantic Ocean. The 1,345 ton Anna was carrying coal and two motor boats as deck cargo and was headed for St. Georges, Bermuda.  
   
  The 41 ton American motor fishing vessel Aeolus was sunk by gunfire by the U-432, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz-Otto Schultze, in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 6 survived reached land by lifeboat.  
   
  The 102 ton American motor fishing vessel Ben and Josephine was sunk by gunfire by the U-432 in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 8 survived reached land by lifeboat.  
   
  The unescorted American steam tanker M.F. Elliott was torpedoed and sunk by the U-502, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jürgen von Rosenstiel, about 150 miles northwest of Trinidad off the coast of South America in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 13 died and 32 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS Tarbell (DD 142) and the Brazilian steam tanker Santa Maria. The 6,940 ton M.F. Elliott was carrying water ballast and was headed for Caripito, Venezuela.  
   
  The U.S. freighter Steel Worker hit a mine at Kola Inlet, Murmansk, Soviet Union. There were no casualties among the 36 merchant seamen or two U.S. Navy signalmen.  
   
  Thursday, June 4, 1942  
  The unescorted Norwegian steam merchant Nidarnes was torpedoed and sunk by the U-158, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erwin Rostin, in the Yucatan Strait in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, 13 died and 11 survivors were picked up by an American ship. The 2,647 ton Nidarnes was carrying U.S. military stores and was headed for Cristobal, Dominican Republic.  
   
  Friday, June 5, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam merchant Velma Lykes was torpedoed and sunk by the U-158, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erwin Rostin, about 20 miles off Puerto Juarrez in the Yucatan Channel in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, 15 died and 17 survivors were picked up by the British motor merchant Ardenvohr.  The 2,572 ton Velma Lykes was carrying general cargo and was headed for Cristobal, Dominican Republic. The Ardenvohr would be sunk 5 days later on June 10, 1942 but all the crew of the Velma Lykes would survive the second sinking.  
   
  The Honduran sailing ship Sally was sunk by gunfire by the U-159, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Witte, in the Caribbean Sea.  
   
  The unescorted 265 ton Brazilian sailing ship Paracury was damaged by gunfire by the U-159 south of the Dominican Republic in the eastern Caribbean Sea.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Delfina was torpedoed and sunk by the U-172, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Carl Emmermann, about 100 miles north of San Juan, Puerto Rico in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 27 survivors were picked up by the American patrol craft USS PC-67 or reached land by lifeboat. The 3,480 ton Delfina was carrying raw sugar and was headed for Charleston, South Carolina.  
   
  The unescorted American steam tanker L.J. Drake was torpedoed and sunk by the U-68, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Karl-Friedrich Merten, in the Caribbean Sea. All of the ship’s complement of 40 died. The 6,693 ton L.J. Drake was carrying gasoline and was headed for San Juan, Puerto Rico.  
   
  The neutral 320 ton Portuguese sailing ship Maria da Gloria was sunk by gunfire by the U-94, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto Ites, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 36 died and 8 survived.  
   
  Saturday, June 6, 1942  
  The unescorted Panamanian motor tanker C.O. Stillman was torpedoed and sunk by the U-68, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Karl-Friedrich Merten, in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 55 survivors were picked up by the U.S. Coast Guard patrol boat #83310 or reached land by lifeboat. The 13,006 ton C.O. Stillman was carrying fuel oil and dry cargo and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Sunday, June 7, 1942  
  The unescorted Honduran steam merchant Castilla was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Harald Gelhaus, in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 24 died and 35 survivors were picked up by the patrol vessel USS Nike (WPC 112). The 3,910 ton Castilla was carrying flour and was headed for Kingston, Jamaica.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed Panamanian steam merchant Hermis was torpedoed and sunk by the U-158, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erwin Rostin, in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 46 survivors were picked up by the U.S. Army transport Toloa. The 5,234 ton Hermis was carrying general cargo and was headed for Aruba.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Edith was torpedoed and sunk by the U-159, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Witte, about 200 miles southeast of Jamaica in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 29 survived. The 3,382 ton Edith was carrying general cargo and was headed for Mayaguez, Puerto Rico.  
   
  Monday, June 8, 1942  
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Suwied was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Harald Gelhaus, about 140 miles southeast of Cozumel Island off the Yucatan Peninsula in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, 6D died and 27 survivors were picked up by the patrol vessel USCGC Nemesis (WPC 111). The 3,249 ton Suwied was carrying bauxite ore and was headed for Mobile, Alabama.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian motor tanker South Africa was torpedoed and sunk by the U-128, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Heyse, about 400 miles east of Trinidad off the coast of South America in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 36 survived. The 9,234 ton South Africa was carrying lube distillate and diesel oil and was headed for Freetown, Sierra Leone.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian motor merchant Pleasantville was torpedoed and sunk by the U-135, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Friedrich-Hermann Praetorius, northwest of Bermuda in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 45 survivors were picked up by the American steam merchant Chickasaw City and the Polish motor merchant Paderewski. The 4,549 ton Pleasantville was carrying phosphate and war material, including cars, trucks, aircraft, and two locomotives as deck cargo and was headed for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  The unescorted American motor merchant Sicilien was torpedoed and sunk by the U-172, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Carl Emmermann, about 10 miles south of Cape Beata, Dominican Republic in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 44 died and 31 survivors reached land using rafts. The 1,654 ton Sicilien was carrying general cargo, including beer, foodstuffs, and mattresses and was headed for San Juan, Puerto Rico.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Rosenborg was sunk by gunfire after being missed by two torpedoes by the U-504, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans-Georg Friedrich Poske, east of the Yucatan Peninula in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 23D survivors were picked up by the Norwegian motor merchant Geisha. The 1,512 ton Rosenborg was carrying bauxite and was headed for Mobile, Alabama.  
   
  The unescorted Honduran steam merchant Tela was torpedoed and sunk by the U-504 east of the Yucatan Peninula. Of the ship’s complement, 11 died and 43 survivors were picked up by the Colombian schooner Hiloa. The 3,901 ton Tela was carrying general cargo and was headed for Puerto Limon, Costa Rica.  
   
  Tuesday, June 9, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy TO-5, the steam merchant Bruxelles was torpedoed and sunk by the U-502, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jürgen von Rosenstiel, approximately 35 miles northeast of Cape Blanco, Venezuela in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 53 survived. The 5,085 ton Bruxelles was carrying general cargo and was headed for Kingston, Jamaica.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy TO-5, the American steam tanker Franklin K. Lane was torpedoed and sunk by the U-502 approximately 35 miles northeast of Cape Blanco. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 37 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Churchill (I 45). The 6,589 ton Franklin K. Lane was carrying crude oil and was headed for Aruba.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy BX-23A, the Norwegian motor merchant Kronprinsen was torpedoed and damaged by the U-432, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz-Otto Schultze, south of Cape Sable, Nova Scotia in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died. The 7,073 ton Kronprinsen was carrying general cargo, including carbide and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy BX-23A, the British motor merchant Malayan Prince was torpedoed and damaged by the U-432 south of Cape Sable. The 8,593 ton Malayan Prince was carrying general cargo and was bound for the Cardiff, Wales.  
   
  Wednesday, June 10, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam merchant Merrimack was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Harald Gelhaus, about 60 miles off Cozumel Island, south of the Yucatan Channel in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, 43 died and 10 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS Borie (DD 215) and the steam merchant Argentina. The 2,606 ton Merrimack was carrying military supplies and was headed for Cristobal, Dominican Republic.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian motor merchant L.A. Christensen was torpedoed and sunk by the U-129, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Ludwig Witt, in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 31 survived and were picked up by the Norwegian steam merchant Bill. The 4,362 ton L.A. Christensen was carrying ballast and was headed for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  
   
  The British motor merchant Ardenvohr was torpedoed and sunk by the U-68, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Karl-Friedrich Merten, northeast of the Panama Canal in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 70 survivors were picked up by the Dutch steam merchant Flora and by the destroyers USS Edison (DD 439) and USS Barry (DD 248). The 5,025 ton Ardenvohr was carrying general cargo, including munitions, tanks, guns, and machinery and was headed for Melbourne, Australia.  
   
  The British motor merchant Port Montreal was torpedoed and sunk by the U-68, northeast of the Panama Canal in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 86 survivors were picked up by the Colombian schooner Hiloa. The 5,882 ton Port Montreal was carrying ammunition and a deck cargo of 14 aircraft and was headed for Melbourne, Australia.  
   
  The British steam merchant Surrey was torpedoed and sunk by the U-68, northeast of the Panama Canal in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 12 died and 55 survivors were picked up by the Columbian sailing ship Resolute, by Dutch steam merchant Flora, and the Panamanian steam merchant Potomac. The 8,581 ton Surrey was carrying general cargo, including ammunition, tanks, guns, and machinery and was headed for Sydney, Australia.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-100, the British steam merchant Empire Clough was torpedoed and sunk by the U-94, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Otto Ites, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 44 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Dianthus (K 95) and the Portuguese trawler Argus. The 6,147 ton Empire Clough was carrying ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-100, the British steam merchant Ramsay was torpedoed and sunk by the U-94 southeast of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, 40 died and 8 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Vervain (K 190). The 4,855 ton Ramsay was carrying ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Thursday, June 11, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam tanker Hagan was torpedoed and sunk by the U-157, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Wolf Henne, about five miles off the north coast of Cuba in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 38 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 6,401 ton Hagan was carrying blackstrap molasses and was headed for Havana, Cuba.  
   
  The unescorted Panamanian motor tanker Sheherazade was torpedoed and sunk by the U-158, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erwin Rostin, about 20 miles west of Ship Shoal Buoy, Louisiana in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 58 survivors were picked up by fishing vessels. The 13,467 ton Sheherazade was carrying ballast and was headed for Houston, Texas.  
   
  Sailing with a small convoy the steam merchant Fort Good Hope was torpedoed and sunk by the U-159, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Witte, north-northwest of Colon, Panama in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 45 survivors were picked up by the American gunboat USS Erie (PG 50). The 7,130 ton Fort Good Hope was carrying wheat, timber, lead, and zinc and was headed for Garston, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SL-111, the British steam tanker Geo H. Jones was torpedoed and sunk by the U-455, commanded by Hans-Heinrich Giessler, north-northeast of the Azores in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 40 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMIS Orissa (J 200). The 6,914 ton Geo H. Jones was carrying fuel oil and was headed for Ardrossan, Scotland.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant American was torpedoed and sunk by the U-504, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans-Georg Friedrich Poske, off Honduras in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 34 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Kent. The 4,846 ton American was carrying manganese ore, coffee, gunny sacks, jute, and oil and was headed for New Orleans, Louisiana.  
   
  The unescorted Dutch Steam passenger ship Crijnssen was torpedoed and sunk by the U-504 in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 1 died and 92 survived. The 4,282 ton Crijnssen was passengers and was headed for New Orleans, Louisiana.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ONS-100, the British steam merchant Pontypridd was torpedoed and sunk by the U-94, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Otto Ites, northeast of St. Johns, Canada in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 46 survived. The 4,458 ton Pontypridd was carrying ballast and was headed for Sydney, Newfoundland.  
   
  Friday, June 12, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-100, the British steam merchant Dartford was torpedoed and sunk by the U-124, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Johann Mohr, south of Cape Race, Newfoundland in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 30 died and 17 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Gothland. The 4,093 ton Dartford was carrying ballast and was headed for Sydney, Newfoundland.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Hardwicke Grange was torpedoed and sunk by the U-129, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Ludwig Witt, north of Puerto Rico in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 75 survivors were picked up by the British motor tanker Athelprince and a second unknown ship. The 9,005 ton Hardwicke Grange was carrying refrigerated cargo and was headed for Buenos Aires, Argentina.  
   
  The unescorted American steam tanker Cities Service Toledo was torpedoed and sunk by the U-158, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erwin Rostin, Trinity Shoal Light Buoy, Louisiana in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, 15 died and 30 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian motor tanker Belinda, the American steam tanker Gulfking, and the Panamanian steam merchant San Antonio. The 8,192 ton Cities Service Toledo was carrying crude oil and was headed for Portland, Maine.  
   
  Saturday, June 13, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam passenger ship Sixaola was torpedoed and sunk by the U-159, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Witte, approximately 50 miles off Bocas del Toro, Panama in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 29 died and 172 survivors were picked up by the US Army tug Shast or reached land by lifeboat. The 4,693 ton Sixaola was carrying passengers, U.S. Army supplies, including trucks, trailers, clothing, and foodstuffs and was headed for New Orleans, Louisiana.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Solon Turman was torpedoed and sunk by the U-159 approximately 100 miles north of Cristobal, Canal Zone in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 52 survivors were picked up by the Colombian schooners Envoy and Zaroma. The 6,762 ton Solon Turman was carrying naval stores, explosives, and construction equipment and was headed for Bora Bora, Society Islands.  
   
  The U.S. freighter Yaka was damaged by near-misses when German aircraft bombed Allied shipping at Murmansk, Soviet Union.  
   
  Sunday, June 14, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam merchant Lebore was torpedoed and sunk by the U-172, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Carl Emmermann, about 200 miles north of Cristobal, Panama in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 93 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS Tattnall (DD 125) after boats and rafts had been spotted by an aircraft on June 16, 1942. Another 25 survivors were picked up from a boat by gunboat USS Erie (PG 50). The 8,289 ton Lebore was carrying coal and was headed for Cruz Grande, Chile.  
   
  The Latvian steam merchant Regent was torpedoed and sunk by the U-504, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans-Georg Friedrich Posk, in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 11 died and 14 survived. The 3,280 ton Regent was headed for Cristobal, Dominican Republic.  
   
  Monday, June 15, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy HG-84, the British steam merchant City of Oxford was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Erich Topp, west of Cape Finisterre off the west coast Spain in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 43 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Copeland. The 2,759 ton City of Oxford was carrying ore and cork and was headed for Garston.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HG-84, the British steam merchant Etrib was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552 west of Cape Finisterre. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 41 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Marigold (K 87). The 1,943 ton Etrib was carrying general cargo, including fruit, wine, and cork and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HG-84, the British motor merchant Pelayo was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Erich Topp west of Cape Finisterre. Of the ship’s complement, 17 died and 30 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Copeland. The 1,346 ton Pelayo was carrying government stores and scrap iron and was headed for Swansea, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HG-84, the British steam merchant Thurso was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552 west of Cape Finisterre. Of the ship’s complement, 13 died and 29 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Marigold (K 87). The 2,436 ton Thurso was carrying general cargo, including cork and mail for German prisoners of war and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HG-84, the Norwegian motor tanker Slemdal was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Erich Topp west of Cape Finisterre. Of the ship’s complement, all 37 survived and were picked up by the British rescue ship Copeland. The 7,374 ton Slemdal was carrying fuel oil and was headed for Clyde, United Kingdom.  
  The 125 ton British sailing ship Dutch Princess was sunk by gunfire by the U-126, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Bauer, in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, all 9 survived.  
   
  The Norwegian steam merchant Bennestvet was torpedoed and sunk by the U-172, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Carl Emmermann, north of Cristobal, Panama in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 12 died and 13 survivors were picked up by the submarine chaser USS PC-458. The  2,438 ton Bennestvet was carrying war material, including trucks, tanks, fuel, alcohol, cement, and steel and was headed for Cristobal, Panama.  
   
  The Panamanian steam merchant Cold Harbor was torpedoed and sunk by the U-502, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jürgen von Rosenstiel, northwest of Trinidad in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 44 survived. The 5,010 ton Cold Harbor was carrying war material, including 28 tanks, aircrafts, and ammunition and was headed for the Persian Gulf.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Scottsburg was torpedoed and sunk by the U-502 approximately 90 miles west of Grenada in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 46 survived. The 8,001 ton Scottsburg was carrying general cargo and war material, including tanks and aircraft and was headed for the Basra, Iraq.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant West Hardaway was torpedoed and sunk by the U-502 approximately 30 miles west of Grenada. Of the ship’s complement, all 50 survived and reached land by lifeboat. The 5,702 ton West Hardaway was carrying war supplies and coal and was headed for Suez, Egypt.  
   
  The neutral French steam tanker Frimaire was torpedoed and sunk by the U-68, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Karl-Friedrich Merten, northeast of Barranquilla, Colombia in the Caribbean Sea. All of the ship’s complement of 60 died. The 9,242 ton Frimaire was carrying ballast and was headed for Coveñas, Colombia.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy KN-109, the American motor tanker Esso Augusta struck a mine and was damaged off the coast of Virginia, United States. Of the ship’s complement, all 57 survived. The 11,237 ton Esso Augusta was carrying diesel oil and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy KN-109, the American steam tanker Robert C. Tuttle struck a mine and was damaged off the coast of Virginia, United States. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 46 survivors were picked up by the patrol craft USS PC-474. The 11,615 ton Robert C. Tuttle was carrying crude oil and was headed for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy KN-109, the American motor tanker Esso Augusta was damaged after hitting a mine in a minefield laid on June 11 by the U-701 off Virginia Beach in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 57 survived. The 11,237 ton Esso Augusta was carrying diesel oil and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy KN-109, the American steam tanker Robert C. Tuttle was damaged after hitting a mine in a minefield laid on June 11 by the U-701 off Virginia Beach in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 46 survived. The 11,237 ton Robert C. Tuttle was carrying crude oil and was bound for the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  
   
  Tuesday, June 16, 1942  
  The unarmed and unescorted American steam merchant Arkansan was torpedoed and sunk by the U-126, commanded by Kapitänleutnant U-126, in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 36 survivors were picked up by the USS Pastores (AF 16). The 6,997 ton Arkansan was carrying general cargo including coffee and was headed for New Orleans, Louisiana.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Kahuku was torpedoed and sunk by the U-126 approximately 90 miles west of Grenada in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 17 died and 92 survivors were picked up by the Venezuelan vessel Minataora and the American patrol vessels USS Opal (PYc 8) and USS YP-63. The 6,062 ton Kahuku was carrying general cargo, including cranes, tractors, and construction equipment and was headed for Bandar Shapur, Iran.  
   
  The Dominican sailing ship Nueva Altagracia was sunk by gunfire by the U-161, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Albrecht Achilles, in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, all 8 survived. The 30 ton Nueva Altagracia was carrying vegetables and fruits and was headed for Aruba.  
   
  The Nicaraguan steam merchant Managua was torpedoed and sunk by the U-67, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Müller-Stöckheim, north of Cuba in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, all 25 survived. The 2,220 ton Managua was carrying potash and was headed for Havana, Cuba.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy XB-25, the American steam passenger ship Cherokee was torpedoed and sunk by the U-87, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Joachim Berger, northeast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 86 died and 83 survivors were picked up by the steam merchant Norlago and by the U.S. Coast Guard cutter USS Escanaba (WPG 77). The 5,896 ton Cherokee was carrying passengers sand ballast and was headed for Boston, Massachusetts.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy XB-25, the British steam merchant Port Nicholson was torpedoed and sunk by the U-87 northeast of Cape Cod. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 85 survived. The 8,402 ton Port Nicholson was carrying automobile parts and military stores and was headed for Wellington, New Zealand.  
   
  Wednesday, June 17, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam merchant Millinocket was torpedoed and sunk by the U-129, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Ludwig Witt, off La Isabela, Cuba in the Straits of Florida. Of the ship’s complement, 11 died and 24 survivors were picked up by Cuban motor boat and two Cuban fishing boats. The 3,274 ton Millinocket was carrying bauxite ore and was headed for Mobile, Alabama.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian steam tanker Moira was was torpedoed and then sunk by gunfire by the U-158, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erwin Rostin, off Corpus Christi, Texas in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 18 survived. The 1,560 ton Moira was headed for Vera Cruz, Mexico.  
   
  The unescorted Panamanian steam merchant San Blas was torpedoed and sunk by the U-158 in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, 30 died and 14 survivors were picked up by a U.S. Navy Catalina flying boat. The 3,601 ton San Blas was carrying ballast and was headed for Puerto Barrios, Guatemala.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy KS-511, the American steam merchant Santore struck a mine and sank in the Chesapeake Bay. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 43 survivors were picked up by U.S. Coast guard vessels. The 7,117 ton Santore was carrying coal and was headed for Balboa, Panama.  
   
  Thursday, June 18, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-102, the American steam merchant Seattle Spirit was torpedoed and sunk by the U-124, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Johann Mohr, off the coast of in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 51 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMCS Agassiz (K 129) and the British rescue ship Perth. The 5,627 ton Seattle Spirit was carrying ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The Dutch steam merchant Flora was sunk by gunfire by the U-159, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Witte, off the coast of Colombia in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 36 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 1,417 ton Flora was carrying general cargo and was headed for Curaçao.  
   
  The British motor tanker Motorex was sunk by gunfire by the U-172, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Carl Emmermann, northwest of Colon, Venezuela in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 20 survived. The 1,958 ton Motorex was carrying diesel oil and was headed for Cristobal, Dominican Republic.  
   
  Friday, June 19, 1942  
  The unescorted and unarmed American sailing ship Cheerio was sunk by gunfire by the U-107, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Harald Gelhaus, eight miles southeast of Mona Island, Puerto Rico in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, all 9 survived and were picked up by the U.S. Coast Guard ship USS CG-459. The 35 ton Cheerio was carrying mahogany.  
   
  The unescorted Yugoslavian steam merchant Ante Matkovic was sunk by gunfire by the U-159, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Witte, off the Colombian coast in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 23 survived. The 2,710 ton Ante Matkovic was carrying coal and was headed for Santiago, Chile.  
   
  Saturday, June 20, 1942  
  The Norwegian motor tanker Nortind was torpedoed and damaged by the U-67, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Müller-Stöckheim, off New Orleans in the Gulf of Mexico.  
   
  The U.S. freighter Alcoa Cadet hit a mine in Kola Inlet, Murmansk, Soviet Union, and broke in two. Ships in the vicinity rescue the survivors (33 merchant seamen and 10 passengers).  
   
  Sunday, June 21, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam merchant West Ira was torpedoed and sunk by the U-128, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Heyse, about 120 miles southeast of Barbados in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 48 survivors were picked up by the Dutch steam merchant Macuba or reached land by lifeboat. The 5,681 ton West Ira was carrying general cargo and was headed for Persian Gulf.  
   
  Monday, June 22, 1942  
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker E.J. Sadler was sunk by gunfire by the U-159, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Witte, about 175 miles south of the Windward Passage in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, all 36 survived and were picked up by the destroyer USS Biddle (DD 151). The 9,639 ton E.J. Sadler was carrying kerosene and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted and neutral Argentinean steam merchant Rio Tercero was torpedoed and sunk by the U-202, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Heinz Linder, about 120 miles off New York in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 37 survived. The 4,864 ton Rio Tercero was carrying general cargo, including coal and mail and was headed for Buenos Aires, Argentina.  
   
  Tuesday, June 23, 1942  
  The Norwegian motor tanker Andrea Brøvig was torpedoed and sunk by the U-128, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Heyse, off Trinidad in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 38 survived reached land by lifeboat. The 10,173 ton Andrea Brøvig was carrying oil and was headed for Freetown, Sierra Leone.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Major General Henry Gibbins was torpedoed and sunk by the U-158, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erwin Rostin, about 375 miles west of Key West, Florida in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, all 68 survived. The 5,766 ton Major General Henry Gibbins was carrying coffee and was headed for New Orleans, Louisana.  
   
  The 35 ton Colombian sailing ship Resolute was sunk by gunfire by the U-172, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Carl Emmermann, near Saint Andrews and Old Providence in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 4 survived.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam tanker Rawleigh Warner was torpedoed and sunk by the U-67, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Müller-Stöckheim, about 40 miles south of South Pass, Louisiana in the Gulf of Mexico. All of the ship’s complement of 33 died. The 3,66 ton Rawleigh Warner was carrying gasoline and was headed for Port St. Joe, Florida.  
   
  The unescorted Panamanian motor tanker Arriaga was torpedoed and sunk by the U-68, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Karl-Friedrich Merten, about 50 miles off the coast of Colombia in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 24 survivors were picked up by Colombian fishing vessels. The 2,345 ton Arriaga was carrying fresh water for a refinery and was headed for Aruba.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy HX-194, the Norwegian steam merchant Torvanger was torpedoed and sunk by the U-84, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Horst Uphoff, about 450 miles west of the Azores in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 33 survived. The 6,568 ton Torvanger was carrying war materials and general cargo, including tanks, ammunition, beer and gliders in crates as deck cargo and was headed for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  Wednesday, June 24, 1942  
  The 396 ton American steam tug John R. Williams struck a mine and sank off Cape May, New Jersey in the western Atlantic Ocean. The tug had just refloated the British freighter Port Darwin that had run aground off Fenwick Island Shoal and was returning to Cape May. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and 4 survivors were picked up by the YP-334.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Willimantic was sunk by gunfire by the U-156, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Werner Hartenstein, about 700 miles southeast of Bermuda in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 32 survived. The 4,857 ton Willimantic was carrying ballast and was headed for Baltimore, Maryland.  
   
  The unescorted Yugoslavian steam merchant Ljubica Matkovic was torpedoed and sunk by the U-404, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto von Bülow, in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 30 survived. The 3,289 ton Ljubica Matkovic was carrying sugar, fuel oil, and wood and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Thursday, June 25, 1942  
  The unescorted British motor merchant Anglo-Canadian was torpedoed and sunk by the U-153, commanded by Fregattenkapitän Wilfried Reichmann, about 800 miles northeast of Antigua in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 49 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 5,268 ton Anglo-Canadian was carrying ballast and was headed for Baltimore, Maryland.  
   
  Sailing with a three-column convoy of ten ships, the American steam merchant Manuela was torpedoed and sunk by the U-404, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto von Bülow, approximately 75 miles east of Cape Lookout, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 41 survived. The 4,772 ton Manuela was carrying sugar and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with a three-column convoy of ten ships, the Panamanian steam merchant Nordal was torpedoed and sunk by the U-404 approximately 75 miles east of Cape Lookout. Of the ship’s complement, all 32 survived. The 3,845 ton Nordal was carrying manganese ore, burlap, gunny bales, hides, coffee, and castor seeds and was headed for Baltimore, Maryland.  
   
  Friday, June 26, 1942  
  The unescorted Dutch motor merchant Jagersfontein was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Harald Gelhaus, about 500 miles west of Bermuda in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, all 220 survived and were picked up by the Swiss steam merchant St. Cergue. The 10,083 ton Jagersfontein was carrying passengers, general cargo, including lead, copper, resins, cotton, and timber and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  The unescorted and neutral Brazilian steam merchant Pedrinhas was torpedoed and then sunk by gunfire by the U-203, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Rolf Mützelburg, about 300 miles northeast of Puerto Rico in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 48 survived. The 3,666 ton Pedrinhas was headed for New York, New York. The neutral ship was attacked because it was armed with a 120mm gun on the after deck.  
   
  The unescorted and British motor merchant Putney Hill was torpedoed and sunk by the U-203, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Rolf Mützelburg, about 450 miles east-northeast of Puerto Rico in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 35 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Saxifrage (K 04). The 5,216 ton Putney Hill was carrying ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian motor merchant Tamesis was torpedoed and damaged by the U-701, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Horst Degen, off Diamond Shoal, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. The 7,256 ton Tamesis was carrying copper and tin and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Saturday, June 27, 1942  
  The unescorted Norwegian motor tanker Leiv Eiriksson was torpedoed and sunk by the U-126, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Bauer, west of Barbados in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 40 survivors were picked up by a British motor torpedo boat. The 9,952 ton Leiv Eiriksson was carrying fuel oil and was headed for Gibraltar.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Polybius was torpedoed and sunk by the U-128, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Heyse, about 250 miles east of Trinidad. Of the ship’s complement, 10 died and 34 survived. The 7,041 ton Polybius was carrying manganese ore and general cargo and was headed for Norfolk, Virginia.  
   
  The unescorted Mexican steam tanker Las Choapas was torpedoed and sunk by the U-129, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Ludwig Witt, north of Tecotutla, Vera Cruz in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 28 survived. The 2,005 ton Las Choapas was carrying crude oil and was headed for Tampico, Mexico.  
   
  The unescorted Mexican steam tanker Tuxpam was torpedoed and sunk by the U-129 approximately 40 miles northeast from Gutiérrez Zamora in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 31 survived. The 7,008 ton Tuxpam was carrying ballast and was headed for Tampico, Mexico.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Potlatch was torpedoed and sunk by the U-153, commanded by Fregattenkapitän Wilfried Reichmann, about 650 miles east of the Virgin Islands in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 47 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 6,085 ton Potlatch was carrying army supplies, trucks and tanks and was headed for Suez, Egypt.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian motor merchant Moldanger was torpedoed and sunk by the U-404, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto von Bülow, about 300 miles southeast of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and 30 survived. The 6,827 ton Moldanger was carrying general cargo, including salted hides, tallow, wool, and vegetable oil and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy KS-514, the British motor tanker British Freedom was torpedoed and damaged by the U-701, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Horst Degen, off Diamond Shoal, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. The 6,985 ton British Freedom was carrying ballast and was bound for Trinidad.  
   
  Sunday, June 28, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam merchant Tillie Lykes was torpedoed and sunk by the U-154, commanded by Walther Kölle, in the Gulf of Mexico. All of the ship’s complement of 33 died. The 2,572 ton Tillie Lykes was carrying general cargo, including food and machinery and was headed for San Juan, Puerto Rico.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Sam Houston was torpedoed and sunk by the U-203, commanded by Kapitänleutnant olf Mützelburg, about 160 miles northeast of the Virgin Island in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 38 survivors were picked up by the minesweeper USS Courier (AMc 72). The 7,176 ton Sam Houston was carrying army supplies and was headed for Bombay, India.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed American steam merchant Raphael Semmes was torpedoed and sunk by the U-332, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Johannes Liebe, about 875 miles east of Cape Canaveral, Florida in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 19 died and 18 survivors were picked up by the American steam merchant Explorer. The 6,027 ton Raphael Semmes was carrying manganese ore, tobacco, licorice, wool, and rugs and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Sea Thrush was torpedoed and sunk by the U-505, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Axel-Olaf Loewe, about 425 miles northeast of San Juan, Puerto Rico in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 66 survived. The 5,447 ton Sea Thrush was carrying general cargo and war material, including ammunition and aircraft and was headed for Bandar Shapur, Iran.  
   
  Despite being escorted by the US Coast Guard vessel USS CG-460, the American steam tanker William Rockefeller was torpedoed and sunk by the U-701, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Horst Degen, about 16 miles east-northeast of Diamond Shoals Light Buoy, North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 50 survived and were picked up by the escort. The 14,054 ton William Rockefeller was carrying fuel oil and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Monday, June 29, 1942  
  The Canadian schooner Mona Marie was torpedoed and sunk by the U-126, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Bauer, in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 8 survived. The 126 ton Mona Marie was carrying empty oil drums and was heading for Trinidad.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Ruth was torpedoed and sunk by the U-153, commanded by Fregattenkapitän Wilfried Reichmann, about 100 miles north of Cape Maysi, Cuba in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 34 died and 4 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS Corry (DD-463). The 4,833 ton Ruth was carrying manganese ore and was headed for Baltimore, Maryland.  
   
  The unescorted Latvian steam merchant Everalda was shelled and stopped by the U-158, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erwin Rostin, with the last rounds from the deck gun. The ship caught fire but did not sink, so a boarding party went on board and sank the vessel by opening the bottom valves in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 36 survived. The Germans captured secret orders, routing instructions and other important documents and took the master and another crewman as prisoners on board. Both prisoners were lost when the U-boat was sunk the next day. The 3,950 ton Everalda was carrying general cargo and was headed for Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Thomas McKean was torpedoed and sunk by the U-505, commanded by Axel-Olaf Loewe, about 350 miles northeast of Puerto Rico in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 55 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 7,191 ton Thomas McKean was carrying Lend-Lease war supplies, including tanks, foodstuffs, and 11 aircraft as deck cargo and was headed for Bandar Shapur, Iran.  
   
  The unescorted British steam tanker Empire Mica was torpedoed and sunk by the U-67, commanded by Günther Müller-Stöckheim, southwest of Cape St. George, Florida in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, 33 died and 14 survivors were picked up by the motor boats Sea Dream and Countess. The 8,032 ton Empire Mica was carrying vaporizing oil and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The unescorted British motor merchant Waiwera was torpedoed and sunk by the U-754, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans Oestermann, about 450 miles north of the Azores in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 97 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian motor merchant Oregon Express. The 12,435 ton Waiwera was carrying foodstuffs, including butter, beef, tea, and bags of mail and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Tuesday, June 30, 1942  
  The unescorted Norwegian motor merchant Mosfruit was torpedoed and sunk by the U-458, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Kurt Diggins, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 36 survived and were picked up by the British motor merchant Empire Hope. The 2,714 ton Mosfruit was carrying general cargo and frozen meat and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  Friday, June 26, 1942  
  The German government announced the policy of unrestricted submarine warfare off the U.S. east coast.  
     
   
     
   
 

The objective of WW2Timelines.com is to provide a day by day account of the events that lead up to and were part of the greatest conflict known to mankind. There are accounts for the activities of each particular day and timelines for subjects and personalities. It is the of this website intent to provide an unbiased account of the war. Analysis, effects caused by an event, or prior or subsequent pertinent events are presented separately and indicated as text that is italicized.

 
   
  Copyright 2011
WW2timelines.com
Contact us using our email page