September 1942 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
 
  Overview  
  3 Allied warships were sunk by U-boats.  
  5 Allied auxiliary warships were sunk by U-boats.  
  1 armed Liberty ship and 1 German raider were sunk in a surface gunnery action.  
   
  4 U-boats were sunk by Allied warships.  
  3 U-boats were sunk by Allied aircraft.  
  1 U-boat was sunk by a combination of Allied aircraft and a warship.  
  1 U-boat was was lost due to mines.  
  1 U-boat was sunk in an accident.  
   
  88 Allied or neutral merchant ships were sunk by U-boats or mines totaling 445,296 tons.  
  6 Allied merchant ships were sunk by Luftwaffe aircraft totaling 35,143 tons.  
  8 Allied merchant ships were damaged by U-boats or mines totaling 60,067 tons.  
   
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Thursday, September 3, 1942  
  The transport USS Wakefield (AP 21) was extensively damaged by fire while en route from the River Clyde to New York, New York in Convoy TA 18. The light cruiser USS Brooklyn (CL-40), destroyers USS Mayo (DD-422), USS Madison (DD-425), USS Niblack (DD-424) and Charles F. Hughes USS (DD-428) provided assistance. All 1,500 en aboard the USS Wakefield survived. The USS Niblack stood by with a salvage party. The USS Wakefield would not return to service until February 1944.  
   
  Friday, September 4, 1942  
  An unidentified German U-boat came across one boat containing 19 survivors of the U.S. freighter California, sunk by Italian submarine Reginaldo Giuliani on August 13 and provided rations and navigational assistance before departing.  
   
  Monday, September 7, 1942  
  While escorting Convoy QS-33, the Canadian armed yacht HMCS Raccoon was torpedoed and sunk by the U-165, commanded by Fregattenkapitän Eberhard Hoffmann, in the St. Lawrence River. All of the ship’s complement of 37 died.  
   
  Wednesday, September 9, 1942  
  The 1,827 ton weather ship USS Muskeget (WAG 48) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-755, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Walter Göing, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 121 died.  
   
  Friday, September 11, 1942  
  The Canadian corvette HMCS Charlottetown (K 244) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-517, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Paul Härtwig, about 5 miles off Cap-Chat in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The corvette had escorted the convoy SQ-35 to Rimouski and was returning to Gaspe alone when attacked. Of the ship’s complement, 9 died and 55 survivors were picked up by the minesweeper HMCS Clayoquot (J 174).  
   
  Monday, September 14, 1942  
  While escorting Convoy ON-127, the Canadian destroyer HMCS Ottawa (H 60) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-91, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz Walkerling, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 114 died and 67 survived.  
   
  Wednesday, September 16, 1942  
  The Laconia Incident: USAAF B-24 Liberators from Ascension Island bombed the German submarine U-156, which, along with U-506 and U-507 and Italian submarine Capellini, was engaged in rescuing survivors of the torpedoed British transport Laconia that sank on September 17.  
   
  Thursday, September 17, 1942  
  The Laconia Incident: In the wake of the attack by USAAF B-24 Liberators upon German submarines U-156, U-506 and U-507 and Italian submarine Capellini that were engaged in rescuing the survivors of the torpedoed British transport Laconia, Admiral Karl Doenitz issued orders forbidding U-boats from rescuing survivors of sunken ships (the "Laconia Order"). The Vichy French light cruiser Gloire, sloop Dumont D'Urville and minesweeper Annamite rescued 1,041 people from lifeboats and the German submarines that had picked them up, too.  
   
  Friday, September 18, 1942  
  The destroyer HMS Vimy was detached from its convoy to investigate a raft containing survivors from the U.S. freighter West Lashaway (sunk by the U-66 on August 30). The Vimy, believing the hoisted sail to be part of the disguise of a U-boat, opened fire on the raft. Her gunnery was fortunately bad and the survivors hurriedly struck the sail and were rescued. This group included a woman missionary and four children.  
   
  The Laconia Incident: The Vichy French sloop Dumont D'Urville took on board 42 survivors from sunken British transport Laconia that had been rescued by Italian submarine Capellini.  
   
  The U-455, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Henrich Giessler, laid mines off Charleston, South Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  Saturday, September 19, 1942  
  The ASW trawler HMS Alouette (FY 101) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Klaus Popp, approximately 10 miles west of Cape Espichel, Portugal in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 17 died and 27 survived.  
   
  Sunday, September 20, 1942  
  While escorting Convoy QP-14, the fleet minesweeper HMS Leda (J 93) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-435, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Siegfried Strelow , southwest of Spitsbergen, Norway, in the Arctic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and the survivors were picked up by the British rescue ships Rathlin and Zamalek.  
   
  While escorting Convoy QP-14, the fleet minesweeper destroyer HMS Somali (G 33) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-703, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz Bielfeld, in the Arctic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 82 died and the survivors were picked up by the minesweeping trawler HMS Lord Middleton (FY 219) and the destroyer HMS Ashanti(G 51).  
   
  Saturday, September 26, 1942  
  While escorting Convoy RB-1, the destroyer HMS Veteran (D 72) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-404, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto von Bülow, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 237 died.  
   
  Sunday, September 27, 1942  
  The U.S. Liberty ship Stephen Hopkins engaged the German auxiliary cruiser ship Stier (Schiffe 23) and supply ship Tannenfels in a surface gunnery action in the central southern Atlantic Ocean on the shipping lane between Capetown, South Africa and Paramaribo, Dutch Guiana. The Stier sank the Stephen Hopkins, but the German raider sank after receiving heavy damage by the Stephen Hopkins only 4 inch gun manned by the freighter's Armed Guard Ensign Kenneth Willett and civilian volunteer Cadet Midshipman Edwin J. O'Hara. The Tannenfels rescued the Stier’s survivors. When last seen, Willets, although weakened and suffering, was helping to launch life rafts from the flaming freighter in an effort to save lives. For his "great personal valor and gallant spirit of self-sacrifice," Willett was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross. The Stier was the only commerce raider to be sunk by defensively equipped merchant ships.  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  Tuesday, September 1, 1942  
  The U-756, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Klaus Harney, was sunk by depth charges from the Canadian corvette HMCS Morden (K 170) in the North Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 43 died. During its career the U-756 sank or damaged no ships.  
   
  Wednesday, September 2, 1942  
  The U-222, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ralf von Jessen, was sunk after a collision with the U-626 in the Baltic Sea west of Pillau, East Prussia. Of the ship’s complement, 42 died and 3 survived. During its career the U-222 sank or damaged no ships.  
   
  Thursday, September 3, 1942  
  The U-162, commanded by Fregattenkapitän Jürgen Wattenberg, was sunk by depth charges from the destroyers HMS Vimy (D 33), HMS Pathfinder (G 10) and HMS Quentin (G 78) in the eastern Atlantic Ocean northeast of Trinidad. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 49 survived. During its career the U-162 sank 14 merchant ships for a total of 82,027 tons. Wattenberg, who was considered one of Germany’s top U-boat aces, survived the attack and spent the rest of the war as a POW.  
   
  The U-705, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Karl-Horst Horn, was sunk by depth charges from a British Whitley aircraft in the Bay of Biscay west of Brest, France in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 45 died. During its career the U-705 sank 1 merchant ship for a total of 3,279 tons.  
   
  Saturday, September 12, 1942  
  The U-88, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heino Bohmann, was sunk by depth charges from the destroyer HMS Faulknor (H 62) in the Arctic Ocean south of Spitzbergen, Norway. All of the ship’s complement of 46 died. During its career the U-88 sank 2 merchant ships for a total of 12,304 tons.  
   
  Monday, September 14, 1942  
  The U-589, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans-Joachim Horrer, was sunk by depth charges from the destroyer HMS Onslow (G 17), and depth charges from a Swordfish aircraft from the escort carrier HMS Avenger (D 14) in the Arctic Ocean southwest of Spitzbergen, Norway. All of the ship’s complement of 44 died. During its career the U-589 sank 1 auxiliary warship and damaged 1 merchant ship for a total of 2,847 tons.  
   
  Tuesday, September 15, 1942  
  The U-261, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans Lange, was sunk by depth charges from a British Whitley aircraft west of the Shetlands in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 43 died. During its career the U-261 sank or damaged no ships.  
   
  Wednesday, September 16, 1942  
  The U-457, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Karl Brandenburg, was sunk by depth charges from the destroyer HMS Impulsive in the Barents Sea northeast of Murmansk, Soviet Union. All of the ship’s complement of 45 died. During its career the U-457 sank 2 merchant ships for a total of 15,593 tons and damaged 1 merchant ship for a total of 8,939 tons.  
   
  Friday, September 25, 1942  
  The U-253, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Adolf Friedrichs, was sunk by a British mine northwest of Iceland. All of the ship’s complement of 45 died. During its career the U-253 sank or damaged no ships.  
   
  Sunday, September 27, 1942  
  The U-165, commanded by Fregattenkapitän Eberhard Hoffmann, was sunk by depth charges from a Wellington aircraft in the Bay of Biscay west of Lorient, France in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 51 died. During its career the U-165 sank 1 auxiliary warship, damaged 1 auxiliary warship, sank 2 merchant ships for a total of 8,396 tons, and damaged 3 merchant ships for a total of 14,499 tons.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Tuesday, September 1, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Ilorin was torpedoed and sunk by the U-125, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Folkers, off Legu, Gold Coast in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 33 died and 4 survived. The 815 ton Ilorin was carrying ballast and was headed for Takoradi, Ghana.  
   
  Thursday, September 3, 1942  
  Sailing with an unescorted convoy of five ships, the British steam merchant Hollinside was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Harald Gelhaus, three miles from Cape Sines near Setubal, Portugal in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 48 survivors were picked up by Spanish trawlers. The 4,172 ton Hollinside was carrying ballast and was headed for Almeira, Spain.  
   
  Sailing with an unescorted convoy of five ships, the British steam merchant Penrose was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Harald Gelhaus, three miles from Cape Sines near Setubal, Portugal in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 43 survivors were picked up by a Spanish trawler. The 4,393 ton Penrose was carrying ballast and was headed for Gibraltar.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OS-37, the British steam merchant Ocean Might was torpedoed and sunk by the U-109, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bleichrodt, southwest of Takoradi, Ghana in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 50 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 7,173 ton Ocean Might was carrying military stores and was headed for the Middle East.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy LN-7, the Canadian steam merchant Donald Stewart was torpedoed and sunk by the U-517, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Paul Härtwig, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 17 survivors were picked up by the corvettes HMCS Shawinigan (K 136) and HMCS Trail (K 174). The 1,781 ton Donald Stewart was carrying aviation gasoline in drums and bulk cement for U.S. Air Force and was headed for Goose Bay, Labrador.  
   
  Friday, September 4, 1942  
  The unescorted Mexican steam tanker Amatlan was torpedoed and sunk by the U-171, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Pfeffer, about 60 miles off Tampico, Mexico in the Gulf of Mexico. Of the ship’s complement, 10 died and 24 survived. The 6,511 ton Amatlan was carrying ballast and was headed for Tampico.  
   
  Saturday, September 5, 1942  
  While being escorted by the destroyer HMS Brilliant (H 84) and the boom defense vessel HMS Fernmoor (Z 208), the British motor merchant Myrmidon was torpedoed and sunk by the U-506, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erich Würdemann, southeast of Cape Palmas, Liberia in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, all 245 survived and were picked up by the destroyer. The 6,278 ton Myrmidon was carrying passengers, general cargo, including government stores and explosives and was headed for Colombo, Sri Lanka.  
   
  The Canadian steam merchant Lord Strathcona was torpedoed and sunk by the U-513, commanded by Rolf Rüggeberg, in Wabana Roads, Conception Bay, Newfoundland. Of the ship’s complement, all 44 survived and were picked up by a Customs launch. The 7,335 ton Lord Strathcona was carrying iron ore and was headed for Sydney, Nova Scotia.  
   
  The British steam merchant Saganaga was torpedoed and sunk by the U-513, commanded by Rolf Rüggeberg, in Wabana Roads, Conception Bay, Newfoundland. Of the ship’s complement, 30 died and 14 survivors were picked up by a Customs launch. The 5,454 ton Saganaga was carrying iron ore and was headed for Sydney, Nova Scotia.  
   
  Sunday, September 6, 1942  
  The unescorted British motor merchant Tuscan Star was torpedoed and sunk by the U-109, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bleichrodt, about 300 miles southwest of Cape Palmas, Liberia in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 51 died and 63 survivors were picked up by the British passenger ship Otranto except for a wireless operator who was taken prisoner. The 11,449 ton Tuscan Star was carrying frozen meat and general cargo and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy GAT-2, the Canadian steam merchant John A. Holloway was torpedoed and sunk by the U-164, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Otto Fechner, north of Gallinas Punta, Colombia in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 23 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 1,745 ton John A. Holloway was carrying construction material and was headed for Trinidad.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy QS-33, the Greek steam merchant Aeas was torpedoed and sunk by the U-165, commanded by Fregattenkapitän Eberhard Hoffmann, in the St. Lawrence River. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 29 survived. The 4,729 ton Aeas was carrying lumber and steel and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The unarmed British sailing ship Helen Forsey was sunk by gunfire by the U-514, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Jürgen Auffermann, near Bermuda in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 4 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 167 ton Helen Forsey was carrying molasses and rum and was headed for St. John’s, Newfoundland.  
   
  Monday, September 7, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy QS-33, the Greek steam merchant Mount Pindus was torpedoed and sunk by the U-517, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Paul Härtwig, south of Anticosti Island in the St. Lawrence River. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 35 survived. The 5,729 ton Mount Pindus was carrying general cargo and 8 tanks as deck cargo and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy QS-33, the Greek steam merchant Mount Taygetus was torpedoed and sunk by the U-517, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Paul Härtwig, south of Anticosti Island in the St. Lawrence River. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 26 survived. The 3,286 ton Mount Taygetus was carrying general cargo and 8 tanks as deck cargo and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy QS-33, the Canadian steam merchant Oakton was torpedoed and sunk by the U-517, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Paul Härtwig, south of Anticosti Island in the St. Lawrence River. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 17 survivors were picked up by the Canadian motor launch HMCS Q-083. The 1,727 ton Oakton was carrying coal and was headed for Corner Brook, Newfoundland.  
   
  The 292 ton Faroese fishing steam trawler Tor II was sunk by the U-617, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Albrecht Brandi, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 18 died and 3 survived.  
   
  Wednesday, September 9, 1942  
  The unescorted Swedish motor merchant Peiping was torpedoed and sunk by the U-66, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Friedrich Markworth, in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 31 survived. The 6,390 ton Peiping was carrying wool, skins, and fat and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Thursday, September 10, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy ON-127, the Belgian steam merchant Elisabeth van Belgie was torpedoed and sunk by the U-96, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Jürgen Hellriegel, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 55 survived. The 4,241 ton Elisabeth van Belgie was carrying ballast and was headed for Hampton Roads, Virginia.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ON-127, the Norwegian motor tanker Sveve was torpedoed and sunk by the U-96, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Jürgen Hellriegel, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 39 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMCS Sherbrooke (K 152). The 6,313 ton Sveve was carrying ballast and was headed for Curacao.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ON-127, the British motor tanker F.J. Wolfe was torpedoed and damaged by the U-96, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Jürgen Hellriegel, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 56 survived. The 12,190 ton F.J. Wolfe was carrying ballast and was bound for Trinidad.  
   
  Friday, September 11, 1942  
  A straggler from Convoy ON-127, the British steam tanker Empire Oil was torpedoed and sunk by the U-584, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Joachim Deecke, southwest of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 53 survived and were picked up by the destroyers HMCS St. Croix (I 81) and HMCS Ottawa (H 60). The 8,029 ton Empire Oil was carrying ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ON-127, the Norwegian motor merchant Hindanger was torpedoed and sunk by the U-584, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Joachim Deecke, southwest of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 40 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMCS Amherst (K 148). The 4,884 ton Hindanger was carrying ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The 415 ton Portuguese fishing vessel Delães was sunk by gunfire by the U-96, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Jürgen Hellriegel, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 54 survived.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ON-127, the Norwegian motor tanker Fjordaas was torpedoed and damaged by the U-218, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Richard Becker, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The 7,361 ton Fjordaas was carrying ballast and was bound for Curaçao, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ON-127, the Norwegian steam tanker Marit II was torpedoed and damaged by the U-404, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto von Bülow, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died. The 7,417 ton Marit II was carrying ballast and was bound for Curaçao.  
   
  The 5,458 ton Canadian steam merchant Cornwallis was torpedoed by the U-514, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans Jürgen Auffermann, in the harbor of Bridgetown, Barbados. The ship sank in shallow waters but was raised, repaired, and returned to service.  
   
  Saturday, September 12, 1942  
  The unescorted British troop transport Laconia was torpedoed and sunk by the U-156, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Werner Hartenstein, about 360 miles northeast of Ascension Island in the southern Atlantic Ocean. The 19,695 ton Laconia was carrying passengers, troops, and Italian POWs and was headed for Canada. When the Hartenstein realized that the Laconia was carrying approximately 80 civilians, 268 British Army soldiers, about 1,800 Italian prisoners of war, and 160 Polish soldiers he attempted to save as many as possible by cramming as many in his boat as possible, allowing survivors to rest on the U-Boat, and towing life boats. Hartenstein also reported the incident over open channels, calling for assistance and guaranteeing not to attack Allied ships who respond. On September 16, 1942 four rescue submarines with Red Cross flags draped across their gun decks, were spotted by an American B-24 Liberator bomber from Ascension Island. This bomber was given instructions to bomb the U-boats. The incident led to the Rear Admiral Karl Dönitz’s “Laconia Order”, prohibiting U-boat skippers from picking up any survivors from their victims.  
   
  The unescorted Panamanian steam tanker Stanvac Melbourne was torpedoed and sunk by the U-515, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Henke, off the coast of South America in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 48 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 10,013 ton Stanvac Melbourne was carrying ballast and was headed for Aruba.  
   
  The unescorted Dutch motor tanker Woensdrecht was torpedoed and damaged beyond repair by the U-515, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Henke, off the coast of South America in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 73 survivors were picked up by two American patrol vessels. The 4,668 ton Woensdrecht was carrying ballast and was headed for Port of Spain, Trinidad.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ON-127, the British steam merchant Empire Moonbeam was torpedoed and sunk by the U-608, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Rolf Struckmeier, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 52 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMCS Arvida (K 113). The 6,849 ton Empire Moonbeam was carrying ballast and was headed for Norfolk, Virginia.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ON-127, the British whale factory ship Hektoria was torpedoed and sunk by the U-608, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Rolf Struckmeier, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 85 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMCS Arvida (K 113). The 13,797 ton Hektoria was carrying ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ON-127, the 9,272 ton Norwegian motor tanker Daghild was torpedoed and damaged by the U-404, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto von Bülow, in the northern Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy OS-38, the British motor merchant Trevilley was torpedoed and sunk by the U-68, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Karl-Friedrich Merten, east-northeast of Ascension Island in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 51 survived. The 5,296 ton Trevilley was carrying general and military cargo and was headed for Beira, Mozambique.  
   
  Sunday, September 13, 1942  
  German aerial and submarine attacks began against Convoy PQ-18, bound for Archangel, USSR, approximately 100 miles southwest of Spitsbergen,, Norway in the Arctic Ocean.  
     
  Sailing with Convoy PQ-18, the American steam merchant Oliver Ellsworth was torpedoed and sunk by the U-408, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Reinhard von Hymmen, approximately 100 miles southwest of Spitsbergen. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 69 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Copeland and the minesweeping trawler HMS St. Kenan (FY 264). The 7,191 ton Oliver Ellsworth was carrying ammunition and aircraft as deck cargo and was headed for Archangel, Soviet Union.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy PQ-18, the British steam merchant Stalingrad was torpedoed and sunk by the U-408, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Reinhard von Hymmen, approximately 100 miles southwest of Spitsbergen. Of the ship’s complement, 21 died and 66 survivors were picked up by British motor minesweepers. The 3,559 ton Stalingrad was carrying explosives and tanks and aircraft as deck cargo and was headed for Archangel, Soviet Union.  
   
  Luftwaffe planes torpedoed and damaged the 7,177 ton U.S. freighter John Penn, sailing with Convoy PQ-18, in the Barents Sea. Three of the 40-man merchant crew were killed. The British destroyer HMS Eskimo and minesweeper HMS Harrier rescued the survivors, who included the 25-man Armed Guard. The John Penn was then scuttled by escort vessels.  
     
  Luftwaffe planes torpedoed and sank the 4,862 ton U.S. freighter Oregonian, sailing with Convoy PQ-18, in the Barents Sea approximately 200 miles west-northwest of Bear Island. Escort vessels rescued 21 of the 40-man crew, in addition to 8 of the 14-man Armed Guard.  
     
  The unescorted and neutral Swedish motor merchant Lima was torpedoed and sunk by the U-506, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erich Würdemann, off Liberia in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 30 survived. The 3,764 ton Lima was carrying manganese ore, tea. and tobacco and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The unescorted American steam tanker Patrick J. Hurley was sunk by gunfire by the U-512, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wolfgang Schultze, approximately 950 miles northeast of Barbados in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 17 died and 45 survivors were picked up by the Swedish steam merchant Etna and the British steam merchant Loch Dee. The 10,865 ton Patrick J. Hurley was carrying high octane gasoline and diesel oil and was headed for Avonmouth, England.  
   
  The unescorted and unarmed Panamanian steam merchant Nimba was torpedoed and sunk by the U-515, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Henke, off the coast of South America in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 20 died and 12 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS Barney (DD 149). The 1,854 ton Nimba was carrying bauxite and was headed for Trinidad.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Ocean Vanguard was torpedoed and sunk by the U-515, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Henke, off the coast of South America in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 11 died and 40 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian motor merchant Braga. The 7,174 ton Ocean Vanguard was carrying ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy TAG-5, the British motor merchant Empire Lugard was torpedoed and sunk by the U-558, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Krech, off the coast of South America in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 47 survived and were picked up by the Norwegian motor tanker Vilja. The 7,241 ton Empire Lugard was carrying bauxite and was headed for St. John’s, New Brunswick.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy TAG-5, the Dutch steam merchant Suriname was torpedoed and sunk by the U-558, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Krech, off the coast of South America in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 13 died and 69 survivors were picked up by an American escort. The 7,241 ton Suriname was carrying general cargo, including copper and sugar and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy TAG-5, the Norwegian motor tanker Vilja was torpedoed and damaged beyond repair by the U-558, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Krech, off the coast of South America in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 34 survived. The 6,672 ton Vilja was carrying ballast and was headed for New Orleans, Louisiana.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ON-127, the Panamanian steam merchant Stone Street was torpedoed and sunk by the U-594, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Friedrich Mumm, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 13 died and 39 survivors were picked up by the steam merchant Irish Larch. The 6,131 ton Stone Street was carrying ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Monday, September 14, 1942  
  Luftwaffe aircraft planes torpedoed continued to attack the Archangel bound Convoy PQ-18and sank the 5,049 ton U.S. freighter Mary Luckenbach approximately 600 miles west of North Cape, Norway. The Mary Luckenbach was lost with all hands (41 merchant seamen and a 24-man Armed Guard).  
     
  The violent explosion of Mary Luckenbach's ammunition cargo rained debris on the nearby 7,177 ton U.S. freighter Nathanael Greene injuring 11 men (five of whom are transferred to British destroyer HMS Onslaught for medical attention), but the merchantman made port under her own power.  
     
  Concussion from the explosion of the Mary Luckenbach also disabled the 5,432 ton U.S. freighter Wacosta, which was later torpedoed and sunk about 400 miles northeast of Jan Mayen Island. The Wacosta suffered no casualties. The British light cruiser HMS Scylla and minesweeper HMS Harrier rescued all 49 hands (38 merchant sailors and the 11-man Armed Guard.)  
     
  A straggler from Convoy PQ-18, the British motor tanker Atheltemplar was torpedoed and damaged by the U-457, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Karl Brandenburg, and then torpedoed and sunk by the U-408, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Reinhard von Hymmen, in the Arctic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 16 died and 45 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Copeland and the destroyer HMS Offa (G 29). The 8,939 ton Atheltemplar was carrying Admiralty fuel oil and was headed for Archangel, Soviet Union.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Harborough was torpedoed and then sunk by gunfire by the U-515, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Henke, 40 miles east of Trinidad in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 45 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 5,415 ton Harborough was carrying general cargo and bags of mail and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Tuesday, September 15, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Kioto was torpedoed and sunk by the U-514, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Jürgen Auffermann, east of Tobago in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 69 survivors were picked up by the Trinidad government ship Trinidad. The 3,297 ton Kioto was carrying chrome ore and was headed for Baltimore, Maryland.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian motor merchant Sørholt was torpedoed and sunk by the U-515, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Henke, about 100 miles east of Trinidad in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 31 survivors were picked up by two motor torpedo boats. The 4,801 ton Sørholt was carrying general cargo, including canned meats, hides, wool and vegetables and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SQ-36, the Norwegian steam merchant Inger Elisabeth was torpedoed and sunk by the U-517, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Paul Härtwig, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 23 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 2,166 ton Inger Elisabeth was carrying coal and was headed for Port Alfred, Quebec.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SQ-36, the Dutch steam merchant Saturnus was torpedoed and sunk by the U-517, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Paul Härtwig, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 35 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 2,741 ton Saturnus was carrying coal and was headed for Montreal, Quebec.  
   
  Wednesday, September 16, 1942  
  The Dutch steam merchant Breedijk was torpedoed and sunk by the U-68, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Karl-Friedrich Merten, off the coast of French West Africa in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 50 survived. The 6,861 ton Breedijk was carrying tea, jute, and pig iron and was headed for Freetown, Sierra Leone.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SQ-36, the Greek steam merchant Joannis was torpedoed and sunk by the U-165, commanded by Fregattenkapitän Eberhard Hoffmann, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Of the ship’s complement, all 32 survived. The 3,667 ton Joannis was headed for Montreal. Quebec.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SQ-36, the British steam merchant Essex Lance was torpedoed and damaged by the U-165, commanded by Fregattenkapitän Eberhard Hoffmann, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The 6,625 ton Essex Lance was carrying ballast and was bound for Montreal, Canada.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SQ-36, the American steam merchant Pan York was torpedoed and damaged by the U-165, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Fregattenkapitän Eberhard Hoffmann, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The 4,570 ton Pan York was bound for Montreal, Canada.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Commercial Trader was torpedoed and sunk by the U-558, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Krech, about 75 miles east of Trinidad in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 10 died and 28 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 2,606 ton Commercial Trader was carrying caster seed and manganese ore and was headed for the United States.  
   
  Thursday, September 17, 1942  
  Dispersed from Convoy OG-80, the British steam merchant Peterton was torpedoed and sunk by the U-109, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bleichrodt, northwest of the Cape Verde Islands in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 9 died and 34 survivors were picked up by the armed trawler HMS Canna (T 161) and the British steam merchant Empire Whimbrel except for the master who was taken prisoner. The 5,221 ton Peterton was carrying coal and was headed for Buenos Aires, Argentina.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Mae was torpedoed and sunk by the U-515, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Henke, approximately 40 miles north of the Georgetown Beacon, British Guiana in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 40 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian steam merchant Sørvangen. The 5,607 ton Mae was carrying water ballast and was headed for Georgetown.  
   
  Friday, September 18, 1942  
  The unescorted Canadian steam merchant Norfolk was torpedoed and sunk by the U-175, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bruns, northeast of Georgetown, British Guiana in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 13 survivors were picked up by the Spanish merchant Indaucha. The 1,901 ton Norfolk was carrying bauxite and was headed for Trinidad.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian motor merchant Olaf Fostenes was torpedoed and sunk by the U-380, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Josef Röther, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 36 survived and were picked up by the destroyer HMS Firedrake (H 79). The 2,994 ton Olaf Fostenes was carrying ballast and was headed for Halifax , Nova Scotia.  
   
  German torpedo planes continued attacks upon Archangel-bound Convoy PQ-18 and sank the 5,446 ton U.S. freighter Kentucky in the Arctic Ocean approximately 35 miles west of Cape Kanin, Soviet Union. All hands survive the loss of the ship. Two British minesweepers rescued the 38-man merchant complement and the 16-man Armed Guard.  
   
  Saturday, September 19, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Quebec City was torpedoed and sunk by the U-156, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Werner Hartenstein, north-northwest of the Ascension Island in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 41 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Decoy (H 75). The 4,745 ton Quebec City was carrying general cargo and cotton and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The neutral Spanish motor merchant Monte Gorbea was torpedoed and sunk by the U-512, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wolfgang Schultze, east of Martinique in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 52 died and 66 survived. The 3,720 ton Monte Gorbea was carrying wheat and beans and was headed for Bilbao, Spain. Schultze decided to sink the ship despite of seeing the neutral flag. The commander had to expect a war tribunal on his return, but the U-boat was lost during the patrol.  
   
  The unescorted American motor merchant Wichita was torpedoed and sunk by the U-516, commanded by Gerhard Wiebe, approximately 300 miles northeast of Barbados in the western Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 50 died. The 6,174 ton Wichita was carrying general cargo and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Sunday, September 20, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy QP-14, the American steam merchant Silver Sword was torpedoed and sunk by the U-255, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Reinhart Reche, n the Greenland Sea of the Arctic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 63 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ships Rathlin and Zamalek. The 4,937 ton Silver Sword was carrying hides and chrome ore and a deck cargo of wood pulp and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Reedpool was torpedoed and sunk by the U-515, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Henke, approximately 240 miles southeast of Trinidad in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 53 survivors were picked up by the British schooner Millie M. Masher except for the master who was taken prisoner. The 4,838 ton Reedpool was carrying ballast and was headed for Fernandina, Florida.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-100, the British steam merchant Empire Hartebeeste was torpedoed and sunk by the U-596, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Gunter Jahn, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 46 survived and were picked up by the Norwegian merchant Rio Verde and the Norwegian merchant Norhauk. The 5,676 ton Empire Hartebeeste was carrying steel, canned goods, timber, and trucks and was headed for Hull, England.  
   
  Monday, September 21, 1942  
  The unescorted Yugoslavian steam merchant Predsednik Kopajtic was torpedoed and sunk by the U-175, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bruns, off the coast of South America in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 25 survived. The 1,798 ton Predsednik Kopajtic was carrying ballast and was headed for Demerara, British Guiana.  
   
  Tuesday, September 22, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy QP-14, the American steam merchant Bellingham was torpedoed and sunk by the U-435, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Siegfried Strelow, west of Jan Mayen Island in the Arctic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 75 survived and were picked up by the British rescue ship Rathlin and by various escort ships. The 5,345 ton Bellingham was carrying mineral ore and skins and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy QP-14, the British fleet oiler Grey Ranger was torpedoed and sunk by the U-435, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Siegfried Strelow, west of Jan Mayen Island in the Arctic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 33 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Rathlin. The 3,313 ton Grey Ranger was carrying ballast and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy QP-14, the British steam merchant Ocean Voice was torpedoed and sunk by the U-435, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Siegfried Strelow, west of Jan Mayen Island in the Arctic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 89 survived and were picked up by the minesweeper HMS Seagull (N 85) and the British rescue ship Zamalek. The 7,174 ton Ocean Voice was carrying timber and sulfite pulp and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Wednesday, September 23, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Bruyère was torpedoed and sunk by the U-125, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Folkers, southwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 51 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMS Petunia (K 79) and the armed trawler HMS Sir Wistan (4.105). The 5,335 ton Bruyère was carrying foodstuffs and general cargo and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian British steam merchant Lindvangen was torpedoed and sunk by the U-515, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Henke, off the coast of South America in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 15 died and 8 survivors were picked up by the British examination vessel HMS Helene. The 2,412 ton Lindvangen was carrying bauxite and was headed for Port of Spain, Trinidad.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian motor merchant Vibran was torpedoed and sunk by the U-582, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Schulte, southeast of Newfoundland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 48 died. The 2,993 ton Vibran was carrying ballast and was headed for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-100, the British motor tanker Athelsultan was torpedoed and sunk by the U-617, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Albrecht Brandi, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 51 died and 10 survivors were picked up by the corvettes HMCS Weyburn (K 173) and HMS Nasturtium (K 107). The 8,882 ton Athelsultan was carrying molasses and alcohol and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-100, the British steam merchant Tennessee was torpedoed and sunk by the U-617, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Albrecht Brandi, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 15 died and 20 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Nasturtium (K 107) and the cutter USCGC Ingham (WPG 35). The 2,342 ton Tennessee was carrying wheat and was headed for Tyne, England.  
   
  Thursday, September 24, 1942  
  Dispersed from Convoy TRIN-14, the American steam merchant West Chetac was torpedoed and sunk by the U-175, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bruns, approximately 100 miles north of Georgetown, British Guiana in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 31 died and 19 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS Roe (DD 418). The 5,627 ton West Chetac was carrying general war supplies and was headed for Basra, Iraq.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SC-100, the American steam merchant Pennmar was torpedoed and sunk by the U-432, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz-Otto Schultze, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 60 survivors were picked up by the cutter USCGC Bibb (WPG 31). The 5,868 ton Pennmar was carrying general cargo, including steel, food, and trucks and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Antinous was torpedoed and sunk by the U-512, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wolfgang Schultze, southeast of Trinidad in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 48 survived. The 6,034 ton Antinous was carrying bauxite ore and was headed for Georgetown, British Guiana.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SC-100, the Belgian steam merchant Roumanie was torpedoed and sunk by the U-617, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Albrecht Brandi, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 42 died and the one survivor was taken prisoner. The 3,563 ton Roumanie was carrying general cargo and was headed for London, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ON-131, the American steam merchant John Winthrop was torpedoed and then sunk by gunfire by the U-619, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Kurt Makowski, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 52 died. The 7,176 ton John Winthrop was carrying ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Friday, September 25, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy RB-1, the British steam passenger ship Boston was torpedoed and sunk by the U-216, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Karl-Otto Schultz, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 65 survived and were picked up by the destroyer HMS Veteran (D 72) and the American merchant New Bedford. The 4,989 ton Boston was carrying ballast and was headed for Londonderry, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy UR-42, the British steam merchant Empire Bell was torpedoed and sunk by the U-442, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans-Joachim Hesse, west-southwest of the Faroe Islands in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 10 died and 27 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian steam merchant Lysaker IV. The 1,744 ton Empire Bell was carrying coal and was headed for Reykjavik, Iceland.  
   
  Saturday, September 26, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy RB-1, the British steam merchant Yorktown was torpedoed and sunk by the U-619, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Kurt Makowski, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 18 died and 42 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Sardonyx (H 26). The 1,547 ton Yorktown was carrying ballast and was headed for Londonderry, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy RB-1, the British steam merchant New York was torpedoed and sunk by the U-91, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz Walkerling, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 64 died. The 4,989 ton New York was carrying ballast and was headed for Londonderry, England.  
   
  The unescorted Panamanian steam merchant Tambour was torpedoed and sunk by the U-175, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bruns, off the coast of South America in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 24 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian motor merchant Thalatta. The 1,827 ton Tambour was carrying bauxite and was headed for Trinidad.  
   
  Monday, September 28, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam merchant Alcoa Mariner was torpedoed and sunk by the U-175, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bruns, approximately 20 miles off the Orinoco River, Venezuela in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 54 survived and were picked up by the Canadian motor merchant Turret Cape. The 5,590 ton Alcoa Mariner was carrying ballast and was headed for Georgetown, British Guiana.  
   
  Sailing with a small convoy consisting of two merchant ships escorted by the destroyer USS Roe (DD 418), the Brazilian steam merchant Lages was torpedoed and damaged beyond repair by the U-514, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Jürgen Auffermann, approximately 75 miles north of Salinas. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 46 survived. The 5,472 ton Lages was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with a small convoy consisting of two merchant ships escorted by the destroyer USS Roe (DD 418), the Brazilian steam merchant Osório was torpedoed and damaged beyond repair by the U-514, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Jürgen Auffermann, approximately 75 miles north of Salinas. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 34 survived. The 2,730 ton Osório was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted Brazilian steam merchant Antonico was sunk by gunfire by the U-516, commanded by Gerhard Wiebe, at the entrance to the Marowyne River, Brazil in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 16 died and 24 survived. The 1,223 ton Antonico was headed for Paramaribo, Dutch Guiana.  
   
  Tuesday, September 29, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Baron Ogilvy was torpedoed and sunk by the U-125, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Folkers, southwest of Cape Palmas, Liberia in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 33 survivors were picked up by the Portuguese steam passenger ship Mouzinho. The 3,391 ton Baron Ogilvy was carrying iron ore and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Registan was torpedoed and sunk by the U-332, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Johannes Liebe, about 140 miles east of Barbados in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 16 died and 38 survivors were picked up by the Argentinian merchant Rio Neuquen. The 6,008 ton Registan was carrying general cargo and was headed for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SC-101, the British steam merchant Lifland was torpedoed and sunk by the U-610, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Walter von Freyberg-Eisenberg-Allmendingen, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 24 died. The 2,254 ton Lifland was carrying timber and was headed for Milford Haven, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-209, the British steam merchant Ocean Vagabond was torpedoed and damaged by the U-513, commanded by Rolf Rüggeberg, near the Gulf of St. Lawrence in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean.  
   
Wednesday, September 30, 1942
  The unescorted British steam merchant Empire Avocet was torpedoed and sunk by the U-125, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Folkers, approximately 350 miles south of Freetown, Sierra Leone in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 56 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Cowslip (K 196). The 6,015 ton Empire Avocet was carrying meat and general cargo and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The unescorted British steam passenger ship Kumsang was torpedoed and sunk by the U-125, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Folkers, approximately 300 miles south of Freetown, Sierra Leone in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 110 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 5,447 ton Kumsang was carrying general cargo and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The unescorted British motor merchant Siam II was torpedoed and sunk by the U-506, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Erich Würdemann, southwest of Monrovia, Liberia in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 39 survived and were picked up by the British steam merchant Nagpore. The 6,637 ton Siam II was carrying cotton, general cargo, and grain and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Alipore was torpedoed and then sunk by gunfire by the U-516, commanded by Gerhard Wiebe, northeast of Georgetown, British Guiana in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 10 died and 73 survivors were picked up by the fishing schooner United Eagle. The 5,273 ton Alipore was carrying chrome ore and olive oil and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
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