October 1942 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
 
  Overview  
  3 Allied warships were damaged by U-boats.  
  1 Soviet warship was sunk by a mine.  
   
  7 U-boats were sunk by Allied aircraft.  
  3 U-boats were sunk by Allied warships.  
  1 U-boat was was lost due to mines.  
  1 U-boat went missing, cause unknown.  
  1 U-boat was damaged by Allied aircraft.  
   
  83 Allied merchant ships were sunk by U-boats or mines totaling 531,175 tons.  
  7 Allied merchant ships were damaged by U-boats or mines totaling over 48,891 tons.  
     
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Tuesday, October 6, 1942  
  The corvette HMS Crocus (K 49) fought a battle with the U-333, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Peter Erich Cremer, approximately 60 miles southwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. The U-boat was rammed twice and a gun duel was fought out on close distance. Both vessels suffered damage and sustained casualties. The HMS Crocus lost three men dead and several men wounded, including the commander. U-333 was heavily damaged and limped back to base with help from the Milk Cow U-459.  
   
  Sunday, October 11, 1942  
  The Soviet anti-submarine trawler Musson (No 23) struck a mine and sank approximately 5 miles from Chernyj Kamen´ Island in the Barents Sea in the Arctic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 25 died and 18 survived.  
   
  Friday, October 23, 1942  
  The light cruiser HMS Phoebe (43) was torpedoed and damaged by the U-161, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Albrecht Achilles, six miles from Pointe Noire, French Equatorial Africa in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 42 died.  
   
  Friday, October 30, 1942  
  The A/S trawler HMS Northern Spray (FY 129) was damaged by an explosion, apparently from a torpedo. No attack report has been found in the U-boat logs to match the claim.  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  Friday, October 2, 1942  
  The U-512, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wolfgang Schultze, was sunk by depth charges from an American B-18 Bolo bomber north of Cayenne, French Guiana. Of the ship’s complement, 51 died and 1 survived. During its career the U-512 sank 3 merchant ships sunk for a total of 20,619 tons.  
   
  Monday, October 5, 1942  
  The U-582, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Werner Schulte, was sunk by depth charges from an American PBY Catalina patrol bomber southwest of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 46 died. During its career the U-582 sank 1 warship and 6 merchant ships for a total of 38,826 merchant tons.  
   
  The U-619, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Kurt Makowski, was sunk by 4 depth charges from a British Hudson aircraft southwest of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 44 died. During its career the U-619 sank 2 merchant ships for a total of 8,723 tons.  
   
  Tuesday, October 6, 1942  
  The U-116, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Wilhelm Grimme, went missing in the North Atlantic, details and position not known. The last radiogram was sent on October 6, 1942. All of the ship’s complement of 56 died. During its career the U-116 sank 1 merchant ship for a total of 4,284 tons sunk and damaged 1 merchant ship for a total of 7,093 tons.  
   
  Thursday, October 8, 1942  
  The U-179, commanded by Fregattenkapitän Ernst Sobe, was sunk by depth charges from the British destroyer HMS Active (H 14) in the South Atlantic near Cape Town, South Africa after sinking the British steam merchant City of Athens. All of the ship’s complement of 61 died. During its career the U-179 sank 1 merchant ship for a total of 6,558 tons.  
   
  Friday, October 9, 1942  
  The U-171, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Pfeffer, was sunk by mines in the Bay of Biscay near Lorient, France in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 22 died and 30 survived. During its career the U-171 sank 3 merchant ships for a total of 17,641 tons.  
   
  The U-505, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Peter Zschech, was damaged by U.S. aircraft off Trinidad, British West Indies, in the western Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  Monday, October 12, 1942  
  The U-597, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Eberhard Bopst, was sunk by depth charges from a British Liberator aircraft southwest of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 49 died. During its career the U-597 sank or damaged no ships.  
   
  Thursday, October 15, 1942  
  The U-661, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Erich Lilienfeld, was sunk after being rammed by the British destroyer HMS Viscount (D 92) in the North Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 44 died. During its career the U-661 sank 1 merchant ship for a total of 3,672 tons.  
   
  Friday, October 16, 1942  
  The U-353, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wolfgang Römer, was sunk by depth charges from the British destroyer HMS Fame (H 78) in the North Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 39 survived. During its career the U-353 sank or damaged no ships.  
   
  Tuesday, October 20, 1942  
  The U-216, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Karl-Otto Schultz, was sunk by depth charges from a British Liberator aircraft southwest of Ireland in the North Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 45 died. During its career the U-216 sank 1 merchant ship for a total of 4,989 tons.  
   
  Thursday, October 22, 1942  
  The U-412, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Walther Jahrmärker, was sunk by depth charges from a British Wellington aircraft northeast of the Faroe Islands in the North Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 47 died. During its career the U-412 sank or damaged no ships.  
   
  Saturday, October 24, 1942  
  The U-599, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wolfgang Breithaupt, was sunk by depth charges from a British Liberator aircraft northeast of the Azores in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 44 died. During its career the U-599 sank or damaged no ships.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Thursday, October 1, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Empire Tennyson was torpedoed and sunk by the U-175, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bruns, southeast of Trinidad in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 36 survivors were picked up by the American gunboat USS PG-58. The 2,880 ton Empire Tennyson was carrying bauxite and was bound for Trinidad.  
   
  The unescorted Dutch steam merchant Achilles was torpedoed and sunk by the U-202, commanded by Günter Poser, off the coast of South America in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 35 survived. The 1,815 ton Achilles was carrying sugar and general cargo and was bound for Trinidad.  
   
  Friday, October 2, 1942  
  The unescorted Panamanian steam merchant Aneroid was torpedoed and sunk by the U-175, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bruns, about 130 miles off Georgetown, British Guiana in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 43 survivors were picked up by the Yugoslavian steam merchant Ivan and the Honduran steam merchant Olambala. The 5,074 ton Aneroid was carrying bauxite and was bound for Trinidad.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Alcoa Transport was torpedoed and sunk by the U-201, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Rosenberg, southeast of Trinidad in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 30 survivors were picked up by the submarine-chaser USS PC-490. The 2,084 ton Alcoa Transport was carrying bauxite ore and was bound for Georgetown, British Guiana.  
   
  Saturday, October 3, 1942  
  The unescorted American motor tanker Esso Williamsburg was torpedoed and sunk by the U-254, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Odo Loewe, approximately 500 miles south of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 60 died. The 11,237 ton Esso Williamsburg was carrying special Navy fuel oil and was bound for Reykjavik, Iceland.  
   
  Sunday, October 4, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam merchant Caribstar was torpedoed and sunk by the U-175, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bruns, off the mouth of the Orinoco River off the coast of South America in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 29 survivors were picked up by the patrol craft USS PC-469. The 2,592 ton Caribstar was carrying ballast and was bound for Georgetown, British Guiana.  
   
  Monday, October 5, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam merchant William A. McKenney was torpedoed and sunk by the U-175, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Bruns, approximately 50 miles east of Corocoro Island, Venezuela in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 34 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS Blakeley (DD 150). The 6,153 ton William A. McKenney was carrying bauxite ore and general cargo and was bound for Mobile, Alabama.  
   
  Wednesday, October 7, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam passenger ship Andalucia Star was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Harald Gelhaus, approximately 180 miles southwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 4 died and 251 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Petunia (K 79). The 14,943 ton Andalucia Star was carrying passengers, frozen meat and eggs and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  The unescorted British motor merchant Boringia was torpedoed and sunk by the U-159, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Witte, about 200 miles west-southwest of Capetown, South Africa in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 25 died and 35 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Clan Mactavish and the British merchant Matheran. The 5,821 ton Boringia was carrying potash, cotton, gum, and colonial produce and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Chickasaw City was torpedoed and sunk by the U-172, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Carl Emmermann, approximately 85 miles south-southwest of Capetown, South Africa in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 42 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Rockrose (K 51). The 6,196 ton Chickasaw City was carrying chrome ore, coffee and hides and was bound for Port of Spain, Trinidad.  
   
  The unescorted Panamanian motor merchant Firethorn was torpedoed and sunk by the U-172 approximately 60 miles northwest of Capetown. Of the ship’s complement, 12 died and 49 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Rockrose (K 51) and a minesweeper. The 4,700 ton Firethorn was carrying war materials and a deck cargo of tanks and was bound for Suez, Egypt.  
   
  Thursday, October 8, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Glendene was torpedoed and sunk by the U-125, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Folkers, southwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 36 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Agapenor, which was sunk on October 11 by the U-87. All survivors from the Glendene were then picked up by the corvette HMS Petunia (K 79). The 4,412 ton Glendene was carrying general cargo and was bound for Mersey, England.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Clan Mactavish was torpedoed and sunk by the U-159, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Witte, approximately 250 miles east of Cape of Good Hope in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 61 died and 67 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Matheran. The 7,631 ton Clan Mactavish was carrying passengers, copper, extract, and general cargo and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted Greek steam merchant Pantelis was torpedoed and sunk by the U-172, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Carl Emmermann, off Capetown, South Africa in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 28 died and 5 survived. The 3,845 ton Pantelis was carrying ballast and was bound for Buenos Aires, Argentina.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant City of Athens was torpedoed and sunk by the U-179, commanded by Fregattenkapitän Ernst Sobe, 60 miles west-northwest of Capetown, South Africa in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 1 died and 98 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Active (H 14). The 6,558 ton City of Athens was carrying government stores and general cargo and was bound for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant John Carter Rose was torpedoed and sunk by the U-201, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Rosenberg, approximately 850 miles east of Trinidad in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 53 survivors were picked up by the American steam merchant West Humhaw and the Argentinean steam tanker Santa Cruz. The 7,191 ton John Carter Rose was carrying gasoline and general cargo, including foodstuffs, piping, tires, and trucks and was bound for Freetown, Sierra Leone.  
   
  The unescorted Dutch steam merchant Gaasterkerk was torpedoed and sunk by the U-68, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Karl-Friedrich Merten, west of Capetown, South Africa in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 64 survived and were picked up by the destroyer HMAS Nizam (G 38). The 8,679 ton Gaasterkerk was carrying ballast and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted Greek steam merchant Koumoundouros was torpedoed and sunk by the U-68 approximately 20 miles southwest of Cape Point, South Africa. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 26 survived. The 3,598 ton Koumoundouros was carrying maize and was bound for Beira, Mozambique.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Sarthe was torpedoed and sunk by the U-68 southwest of the Cape of Good Hope. Of the ship’s complement, all 57 survived and were picked up by the South African whaler HMSAS Vereeniging (T 62). The 5,271 ton Sarthe was carrying bauxite and pinewood and was bound for Buenos Aires, Argentina.  
   
  Friday, October 9, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam merchant Coloradan was torpedoed and sunk by the U-159, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Witte, approximately 200 miles southwest of Capetown, South Africa in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 48 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Active (H 14) and a fishing boat. The 6,557 ton Coloradan was carrying manganese ore, gold ore, and general cargo and was bound for Port of Spain, Trinidad.  
   
  The unescorted Dutch steam merchant Flensburg was torpedoed and sunk by the U-201, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Rosenberg, approximately 500 miles from Suriname in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 48 survived and were picked up by the Dutch landing craft Prinses Juliana. The 6,421 ton Flensburg was carrying water ballast and British military mail and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SC-103, the British steam merchant Pennington Court was torpedoed and sunk by the U-254, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Odo Loewe, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 40 died. The 6,098 ton Pennington Court was carrying grain and trucks as deck cargo and was bound for Belfast, Ireland.  
   
  The unescorted Belgian steam merchant Belgian Fighter was torpedoed and sunk by the U-68, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Karl-Friedrich Merten, south-southeast of Capetown, South Africa in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 49 survived. The 5,403 ton Belgian Fighter was carrying general cargo and was bound for Baltimore, Maryland.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Examelia was torpedoed and sunk by the U-68 approximately 20 miles south of the Cape of Good Hope. Of the ship’s complement, 11 died and 40 survived. The 4,981 ton Examelia was carrying chrome ore, jute, and hemp and was bound for Capetown, South Africa.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy NL-9, the Canadian steam merchant Carolus was torpedoed and sunk by the U-69, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Ulrich Gräf, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Of the ship’s complement, 11 died and 19 survivors were picked up by the Canadian corvettes HMCS Hepatica (K 159) and HMCS Arrowhead (K 145). The 2,375 ton Carolus was carrying empty barrels and was bound for Montreal, Quebec.  
   
  Saturday, October 10, 1942  
  The unescorted British troop transport Orcades was torpedoed and sunk by the U-172, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Carl Emmermann, about 280 miles northwest of Capetown, South Africa in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 48 died and 1017 survivors were picked up by the Polish steam merchant Narwik. The 23,456 ton Orcades was carrying passengers, troops, and general cargo and was bound for the United Kingdom. The Orcades was one of the largest ships sunk by U-boats during the war.  
   
  The unescorted British steam passenger ship Duchess of Atholl was torpedoed and sunk by the U-178, commanded by Kapitän zur See Hans Ibbeken, approximately 200 miles east-northeast of Ascension Island in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 827 survivors were picked up by the ocean boarding vessel HMS Corinthian (F 103). The 20,119 ton Duchess of Atholl was carrying passengers, including women and children and was bound for the United Kingdom. The Duchess of Atholl was one of the largest ships sunk by U-boats during the war.  
   
  Sunday, October 11, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy BS-31, the British steam merchant Waterton was torpedoed and sunk by the U-106, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hermann Rasch, north of Cape Breton Island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Of the ship’s complement, all 27 survived and were picked up by the Canadian armed yacht HMCS Vison. The 2,140 ton Waterton was carrying wood sulphate and newsprint and was bound for Cleveland, Ohio.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ONS-136, the Panamanian steam merchant El Lago was torpedoed and sunk by the U-615, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ralph Kapitzky, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 57 died and 2 survivors were taken prisoner by the U-615. The 4,221 ton El Lago was carrying ballast and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
The unescorted British steam merchant Agapenor was torpedoed and sunk by the U-87, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Joachim Berger, approximately 180 miles south of Freetown, Sierra Leone in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and 36 survivors from the British steam merchant Glendene, which had been sunk by the U-125 on October 8, 7 died and 124 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Petunia (K 79). The 7,392 ton Agapenor was carrying general cargo and copper and was bound for the United Kingdom.
   
  Monday, October 12, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam merchant Steel Scientist was torpedoed and sunk by the U-514, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Jürgen Auffermann, approximately 95 miles north of Cayenne, French Guiana in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 46 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 5,688 ton Steel Scientist was carrying general cargo and salt ballast and was bound for Paramaribo, Dutch Guiana.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ONS-136, the British steam merchant Stornest was torpedoed and sunk by the U-706, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Alexander von Zitzewitz, west of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 48 died. The 4,265 ton Stornest was carrying coal and was bound for Boston. Massachusetts.  
   
  The U.S. freighter Pan Gulf, in Convoy TAG 18S, blundered into a U.S. minefield in the Gulf of Paria off Trinidad, British West Indies, in the western Atlantic Ocean. The Pan Gulf returned to Trinidad under her own power. There were no casualties among the 38-man merchant complement and 21-man Armed Guard.  
   
  Tuesday, October 13, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Empire Nomad was torpedoed and sunk by the U-159, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Witte, about 250 miles south of Cape Point, South Africa in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 10 died and 44 survivors were picked up by the Panamanian motor tanker Elisha Walker and the British merchant Tynebank. The 7,167 ton Empire Nomad was carrying ballast and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-104, the British steam merchant Ashworth was torpedoed and sunk by the U-221, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Hartwig Trojer, about 500 miles east of Newfoundland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 49 died. The 5,227 ton Ashworth was carrying bauxite and was bound for Belfast, Ireland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-104, the Norwegian steam merchant Fagersten was torpedoed and sunk by the U-221, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Hartwig Trojer, approximately 500 miles east of Newfoundland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 19 died and 10 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Potentilla (K 214). The 2,342 ton Fagersten was carrying lumber and steel and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-104, the Norwegian steam merchant Senta was torpedoed and sunk by the U-221 approximately 500 miles east of Newfoundland. All of the ship’s complement of 35 died. The 3,785 ton Senta was carrying wood pulp and steel and was bound for London, England.  
   
  Wednesday, October 14, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy SC-104, the British whale factory ship Southern Empress was torpedoed and sunk by the U-221, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Hartwig Trojer, northeast of St. John’s, Newfoundland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 48 died and 77 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Potentilla (K 214). The 12,398 ton Southern Empress was carrying fuel oil and a deck cargo of 21 landing craft and was bound for Glasgow, Scotland. Eleven small British landing craft and the following bigger vessels were lost aboard the Southern Empress.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-104, the American steam merchant Susana was torpedoed and sunk by the U-221 northeast of St. John’s. Of the ship’s complement, 48 died and 77 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Potentilla (K 214). The 5,929 ton Susana was carrying general cargo, including valuables and mail and was bound for Cardiff, Wales.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-104, the 4,826 ton Greek steam merchant Nellie was torpedoed and sunk by the U-607, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Mengersen, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 32 died and 5 survived.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-104Y, the British steam merchant Empire Mersey was torpedoed and sunk by the U-618, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Kurt Baberg, south-southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 16 died and 39 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Gothland. The 5,791 ton Empire Mersey was carrying government stores and was bound for Manchester, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-104, the Yugoslavian motor merchant Nikolina Matkovic was torpedoed and sunk by the U-661, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Erich Lilienfeld, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and 21 survived. The 3,672 ton Nikolina Matkovic was carrying sugar and lumber and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy NL-9, the British steam merchant Caribou was torpedoed and sunk by the U-69, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Ulrich Gräf, in the Cabot Strait at the mouth of the Gulf of St. Lawrence in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 136 died and 101 survivors were picked up by the Canadian minesweeper HMCS Grandmere (J 258). The 2,222 ton Caribou was carrying service personnel and passengers and was bound for Port-aux-Basques, Newfoundland.  
   
  The Soviet steam merchant Shchors struck a mine and sank off the western entrance to the Yugor Strait in the Kara Sea in the Arctic Ocean. The 3,770 ton Shchors was carrying furs and was bound for Iceland.  
   
  Thursday, October 15, 1942  
  A straggler from Convoy ONS-136, the British steam merchant Newton Pine was torpedoed and sunk by the U-410, commanded by Kurt Sturm, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 47 died. The 4,212 ton Newton Pine was carrying ballast and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Friday, October 16, 1942  
  The unescorted Norwegian motor merchant Trafalgar was torpedoed and sunk by the U-129, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Ludwig Witt, about 1100 miles northeast of Guadeloupe in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 43 survived and reached land by lifeboat. The 5,542 ton Trafalgar was carrying general cargo, including sunflower seed oil, wet salted hides, corned beef, and quebracho and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy TRIN-19, the British steam merchant Castle Harbour was torpedoed and sunk by the U-160, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg Lassen, 50 miles east-northeast of Trinidad in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 9 died and 14 survivors were picked up by the submarine chaser USS SC-53. The 730 ton Castle Harbour was carrying ballast and was bound for Pernambuco, Brazil.  
   
  Saturday, October 17, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Empire Chaucer was torpedoed and sunk by the U-504, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans-Georg Friedrich Poske, about 450 miles south of Capetown, South Africa in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 47 survivors were picked up by the British merchant Nebraska or reached land by lifeboat. The 5,970 ton Empire Chaucer was carrying pig iron and general cargo, including tea and bags of mail and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Sunday, October 18, 1942  
  A straggler from Convoy ON-137, the American steam merchant Angelina was torpedoed and sunk by the U-618, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Kurt Baberg, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 47 died and 8 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Bury. The 4,772 ton Angelina was carrying sand ballast and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Monday, October 19, 1942  
  The unescorted British motor merchant Rothley was torpedoed and sunk by the U-332, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Johannes Liebe, approximately 300 miles east of Barbados in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 40 survivors were picked up by the reached land by lifeboat. The 4,996 ton Rothley was carrying ballast and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ON-137, the American steam merchant Steel Navigator was torpedoed and sunk by the U-610, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Walter von Freyberg-Eisenberg-Allmendingen, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 36 died and 16 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Decoy (H 75). The 5,718 ton Steel Navigator was carrying sand ballast and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Thursday, October 22, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy ON-139, the British motor merchant Donax was torpedoed and sunk by the U-443, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Konstantin von Puttkamer, southwest of Fastnet, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 63 survived and were picked up by the Canadian corvette HMCS Drumheller (K 167), a British destroyer, and the rescue tug HMS Nimble (W 123). The 8,036 ton Donax was carrying ballast and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ON-139, the British steam passenger ship Winnipeg II was torpedoed and sunk by the U-443 southwest of Fastnet. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, all 192 survived and were picked up by the Canadian corvette HMCS Morden (K 170). The 9,807 ton Winnipeg II was carrying passengers and general cargo and was bound for St. John, New Brunswick.  
   
  Friday, October 23, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy ON-139, the British steam passenger ship Winnipeg II was torpedoed and sunk by the U-443, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Konstantin von Puttkamer, southwest of Fastnet, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, all 192 survived and were picked up by the Canadian corvette HMCS Morden (K 170). The 9,807 ton Winnipeg II was carrying passengers and general cargo and was bound for St. John, New Brunswick.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant Reuben Tipton was torpedoed and sunk by the U-129, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Ludwig Witt, approximately 400 miles northeast of Trinidad in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 51 survivors were picked up by a US Navy PBM flying boat and a British motor torpedo boat. The 6,829 ton Reuben Tipton was carrying chrome ore, rubber, coconut oil, and general cargo and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted British motor merchant Empire Star was torpedoed and sunk by the U-615, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ralph Kapitzky, north of the Azores in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 42 died and 61 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Black Swan (L 57). The 12,656 ton Empire Star was carrying general and government stores and was bound for East London, South Africa.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ONS-136, the British steam merchant Empire Turnstone was torpedoed and sunk by the U-621, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Horst Schünemann, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 46 died. The 6,113 ton Empire Turnstone was carrying ballast and was bound for Port Sulphur, Louisiana.  
   
  Saturday, October 24, 1942  
  The 423 ton Icelandic steam fishing trawler Jon Olafsson was torpedoed and sunk by the U-383, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Horst Kremser, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 13 died.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Holmpark was torpedoed and sunk by the U-516, commanded by Gerhard Wiebe, approximately 900 miles east of Barbados in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 49 survived. The 5,780 ton Holmpark was carrying ballast and was bound for Philadelphia, Philadelphia.  
   
  Sunday, October 25, 1942  
  The unescorted Norwegian motor merchant Primero was torpedoed and sunk by the U-67, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Müller-Stöckheim, east of Barbados in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 40 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 4,414 ton Primero was carrying salt as ballast and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Tuesday, October 27, 1942  
  A three day German submarine attack began on Convoy HX-212 as it headed toward the British Isles.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-212, the British whale factory ship Sourabaya was torpedoed and sunk by the U-436, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Seibicke, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 77 died and 81 survivors and passengers were picked up by the Canadian corvettes HMCS Alberni and HMCS Ville de Quebec (K 242) and the Canadian Steam merchant Bic Island. The 10,107 ton Sourabaya was carrying passengers, fuel oil, war stores, and a landing craft as deck cargo and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-125, the British steam merchant Pacific Star was torpedoed and sunk by the U-509, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Werner Witte, northwest of the Canary Islands in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 96 survived and were picked up by the Spanish tanker Campilo , the Spanish merchant Ciudad de Valencia or reached land by lifeboat. The 7,951 ton Pacific Star was carrying frozen meat and general cargo and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-125, the British motor merchant Stentor was torpedoed and sunk by the U-509 northwest of the Canary Islands. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 44 died and 202 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Woodruff (K 53). The 6,148 ton Stentor was passengers and West African produce and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SL-125, the British motor tanker Anglo Mærsk was torpedoed and sunk by the U-604, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Horst Höltring, west of the Canary Islands in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 35 survived and reached land by lifeboat. The 7,705 ton Anglo Mærsk was carrying ballast and was bound for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  Wednesday, October 28, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy SL-125, the British steam merchant Nagpore was torpedoed and sunk by the U-509, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Werner Witte, northwest of the Canary Islands in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 20 died and 53 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Crocus (K 49) or reached land by lifeboat. The 5,283 ton Nagpore was carrying general cargo, including copper and was bound for Manchester, England.  
   
  German submarines continued their three day attack on Convoy HX-212 as it headed toward the British Isles.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-212, the American steam tanker Gurney E. Newlin was torpedoed and sunk by the U-606, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Heinrich Döhler, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 56 survived. The 8,225 ton Gurney E. Newlin was carrying gasoline and kerosene and was bound for Manchester, England.  
   
  Thursday, October 29, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Laplace was torpedoed and sunk by the U-159, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Witte, southeast of Cape Agulhas, South Africa in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 63 survived. The 7,327 ton Laplace was carrying coal and was bound for Buenos Aires, Argentina.  
   
  The unescorted British motor merchant Ross was torpedoed and sunk by the U-159 southeast of Cape Agulhas. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 39 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Rockrose (K 51). The 4,978 ton Ross was carrying manganese ore and was bound for Trinidad.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SL-125, the British motor merchant Hopecastle was torpedoed and sunk by the U-203, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hermann Kottmann, northwest of the Canary Islands in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 40 survivors were picked up by the British merchant Mano or reached land by lifeboat. The 5,178 ton Hopecastle was carrying magnesite and ilmenite and general cargo, including tea and was bound for Mersey, England.  
   
  German submarines finished their three day attack on Convoy HX-212 as it headed toward the British Isles.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-212, the Canadian steam merchant Bic Island was torpedoed and sunk by the U-224, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Karl Kosbadt, southwest of Rockall in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement – including the 77 survivors from the British Whale factory ship Sourabaya, sunk on October 27 by the U-436 – all 165 died. The 3,921 ton Bic Island was carrying foodstuffs and government stores and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-212, the British steam merchant Barrwhin was torpedoed and sunk by the U-436, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Seibicke, south of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 24 died and 90 survivors were picked up by the Canadian HMCS Kenogami (K 125). The 4,998 ton Barrwhin was carrying grain and military stores and was bound for London, England.  
   
  The unescorted British motor passenger ship Abosso was torpedoed and sunk by the U-575, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Heydemann, about 700 miles northwest of the Azores in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 362 died and 31 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Bideford (L 43). The 11,330 ton Abosso was carrying passengers, wool, and bags of mail and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-212, the Norwegian whale factory ship Kosmos II was torpedoed and sunk by the U-624, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Graf Ulrich von Soden-Fraunhofen, approximately 600 miles southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 33 died and 117 survivors were picked up by the Canadian corvette HMCS Kenogami (K 125). The 16,966 ton Kosmos II was carrying passengers, crude oil and the British landing craft HMS LCT-2190, HMS LCT-2192 and HMS LCT-2284 as deck cargo and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-212, the American steam tanker Pan-New York was torpedoed and sunk by the U-624 approximately 550 miles west of Malin Head, Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, 43 died and 14 survivors were picked up by the Canadian corvette HMCS Rosthern (K 169). The 7,701 ton Pan-New York was carrying aviation gasoline and was bound for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy ON-139, the British catapult armed merchant Primrose Hill was torpedoed and sunk by the UD-5, commanded by Kapitän zur See Bruno Mahn, northwest of the Cape Verde Islands in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 46 survivors were picked up by the British motor merchant Sansu. The 7,628 ton Primrose Hill was carrying coal and general cargo, including war material and 11 aircraft and was bound for Apapa, Nigeria.  
   
  Friday, October 30, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam merchant West Kebar was torpedoed and sunk by the U-129, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Ludwig Witt, approximately 350 miles northeast of Barbados in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 54 survivors were picked up by a British patrol boat, the Spanish motor tanker Campero or reached land by lifeboat. The 5,620 ton West Kebar was carrying manganese ore, palm oil, mahogany, rubber, and general cargo and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SL-125, the British steam merchant Corinaldo was torpedoed and sunk by the U-203, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hermann Kottmann, north of the Canary Islands in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 50 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Cowslip (K 196). The 7,131 ton Corinaldo was carrying frozen meat and was bound for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-125, the British motor merchant Silverwillow was torpedoed, damaged by the U-409, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hanns-Ferdinand Massmann, north-northeast of Madeira in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. The ship for six days before it finally sank. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 61 survivors were picked up by the auxiliary patrol vessel HMS Kelantan (F 166). The 6,373 ton Silverwillow was carrying general cargo and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-125, the British motor merchant Brittany was torpedoed and sunk by the U-509, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Werner Witte, near Madeira in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and 43 survivors were picked up by the auxiliary patrol vessel HMS Kelantan (F 166). The 4,772 ton Brittany was carrying hides, rice, and cotton and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-125, the British steam merchant Baron Vernon was torpedoed and sunk by the U-604, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Horst Höltring, north of Madeira in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 49 survived and were picked up by the British steam merchant Baron Elgin. The 3,642 ton Baron Vernon was carrying iron ore and was bound for Port Talbot, Wales.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-125, the British troop transport Président Doumer was torpedoed and sunk by the U-604 northeast of Madeira. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 260 died and 85 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian steam merchant Alaska and the corvette HMS Cowslip (K 196). The 11,898 ton Président Doumer was carrying troops, general cargo, including palm kernels and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  straggler from Convoy SL-125, the British motor tanker Bullmouth was torpedoed and sunk by the U-659, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans Stock, approximately 100 miles north-northwest of Maderia in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 50 died and 6 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 7,519 ton Bullmouth was carrying ballast and was bound for Tyne, England.  
   
  Saturday, October 31, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy SL-125, the British motor merchant Tasmania was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Gustav-Adolf Janssen, north of Madeira in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 44 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Baron Elgin and the Norwegian steam merchant Alaska. The 6,405 ton Tasmania was carrying foodstuffs, tea, jute, pig iron, and ore and was bound for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  The unescorted British motor merchant Aldington Court was torpedoed and sunk by the U-172, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Carl Emmermann, west of Port Nolloth, South West Africa in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 33 died and 11 survivors were picked up by the British merchant City of Christiania except for the first officer who was taken prisoner. The 4,891 ton Aldington Court was carrying government stores, coal, and general cargo and was bound for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Marylyn was torpedoed and sunk by the U-174, commanded by Ulrich Thilo, approximately 450 miles west-northwest of St. Paul Rocks in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 15 died and 27 survivors were picked up by the British merchant Ettrickbank. The 4,555 ton Marylyn was carrying general cargo and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  Friday, October 2, 1942  
  The former luxury liner Queen Mary, acting as a troop transport and bringing 10,000 Americans to Britain, rammed her escort, the cruiser HMS Curacao, cutting the cruiser in two off the coast of Ireland. The captain of the Queen Mary, fearing the presence of German submarines, didn’t bother to slow down to determine the damage to her escort or to pick up survivors. Of the HMS Curacao’ complement, 338 died and 101 survived. After the war, a court of inquiry determined that the cruiser was at fault for not staying out of the way.  
     
   
     
   
 

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