November 1942 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
  Overview  
  8 Allied warships were sunk by U-boats.  
  5 Allied warships were damaged by U-boats.  
   
  3 U-boats were sunk by Allied aircraft.  
  1 U-boat was sunk by Allied aircraft from an aircraft carrier.  
  2 U-boats were sunk by Allied warships.  
  1 U-boat was lost in the explosion of one of its victims.  
  1 U-boat was was lost in an accidental collision with another U-boat.  
  1 U-boat went missing, cause unknown.  
  1 Vichy French submarine was damaged by an Allied warship.  
   
  86 Allied merchant ships were sunk by U-boats totaling 520,523 tons.  
  5 Allied merchant ships were damaged by U-boats totaling 32,319 tons.  
  1 Allied merchant ship was damaged by Luftwaffe aircraft.  
   
  5 Vichy French merchant ship was sunk by an Allied submarine totaling 5,083 tons.  
   
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Sunday, November 8, 1942  
  U.S. Naval forces participated in Operation Torch, the invasion of Vichy French occupied North Africa.  
   
  Monday, November 9, 1942  
  In continuing Operation Torch activities SOC Curtiss scout-observation planes from the light cruiser USS Philadelphia (CL 41) bombed and damaged the Vichy French submarine Meduse near Cape Mazagan, French Morocco. A SBD Dauntless from the auxiliary aircraft carrier USS Santee (ACV 29) also attacked a surface submarine.  
   
  Wednesday, November 11, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy UGF-1 and at anchor in the Fedhala roads off the coast of Morocco in the eastern Atlantic Ocean, the American troop transport USS Joseph Hewes (AP 50) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-173, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Adolf Schweichel,. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 100 died and 258 survived. The 9,359 ton USS Joseph Hewes landed 80 officers and 1074 rankings of the reinforced 3rd U.S. Army Division, vehicles and supplies. At the time of the attack, she had been completely unloaded and had taken 30 wounded soldiers on board. Torpedoes from the U-173 also damaged the destroyer USS Hambleton (DD 455) and the fleet oiler USS Winooski (AO 38).  
   
  Thursday, November 12, 1942  
  While participating in Operation Torch the destroyer tender HMS Hecla (F 20) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-515, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Henke, west of Gibraltar in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 279 died and 568 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Venomous (D 75). The 10,850 ton HMS Hecla (F 20) was carrying supplies for destroyers and was bound for North Africa. The U-515 also damaged the the destroyer HMS Marne (G 35).  
   
  While participating in Operation Torch the as part of Convoy UGF-1, the American troop transport USS Edward Rutledge (AP 52) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-130, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Ernst Kals, at anchor in the heavily guarded Fedhala Roads off the coast of Morocco in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 15 died. The 9,360 ton USS Edward Rutledge was carrying war material and troops.  
   
  While participating in Operation Torch the as part of Convoy UGF-1, the American troop transport USS Hugh L. Scott (AP 43) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-130, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Ernst Kals, at anchor in the heavily guarded Fedhala Roads off the coast of Morocco in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 59 died and 60 survivors. The 12,479 ton USS Hugh L. Scott was carrying war material and troops.  
   
  While participating in Operation Torch the as part of Convoy UGF-1, the American troop transport USS Tasker H. Bliss (AP 42) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-130, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Ernst Kals, at anchor in the heavily guarded Fedhala Roads off the coast of Morocco in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. The 12,568 ton USS Tasker H. Bliss was carrying war material and troops.  
   
  While escorting Convoy TAG-20, the gunboat USS Erie (PG 50) was torpedoed and damaged by the U-163, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Kurt-Eduard Engelmann, north of Venezuela in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 173 survived. The USS Erie was towed into the harbor of Willemstad for repairs but would be declared a total loss.  
   
  Sunday, November 15, 1942  
  While escorting Convoy MKF-1Y the HMS Avenger (D 14) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-155, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Adolf Cornelius Piening, approximately 120 miles northwest of Gibraltar in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 514 died and 12 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian escort destroyer HNoMS Glaisdale (L 44).  
   
  While sailing with Convoy MKF-1Y the American cargo transport USS Almaack (AK 27) was torpedoed and damaged by the U-155 approximately 120 miles northwest of Gibraltar in the eastern Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  While participating in Operation Torch the, the cargo transport USS Electra (AK 21) was torpedoed and damaged by the U-173, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Adolf Schweichel, off Casablanca in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died. The minesweeper USS Raven (AM 55) was damaged alongside the USS Electra during salvage operations but succeeded in saving the crippled auxiliary.  
   
  Wednesday, November 18, 1942  
  While escorting Convoy ONS-144, the Norwegian corvette HNoMS Montbretia (K 208) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-262, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Heinz Franke, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 47 died and 23 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian corvette HNoMS Potentilla (K 214).  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  Wednesday, November 4, 1942  
  The U-132, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Vogelsang, was sunk when it was probably within the lethal radius of the ammunition ship Hatimura which had been hit by the U-442. All of the ship’s complement of 47 died. During its career under Kapitänleutnant Vogelsang the U-132 sank 1 warship, sank or damaged irreparably 9 merchant ships for a total of 37,331 tons, and damaged 1 merchant ship for a total of 6,690 tons.  
   
  Thursday, November 5, 1942  
  The U-408, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Reinhard von Hymmen, was sunk by depth charges from a U.S. Catalina aircraft north of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 45 died. During its career under Korvettenkapitän von Hymmen the U-408 sank 3merchant ships for a total of 19,689 tons.  
   
  Thursday, November 12, 1942  
  The U-272, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Horst Hepp, was sunk after a collision with the U-634 near Hela in the Baltic Sea. All of the ship’s complement of 29 died and 19 survived. During its career under Oberleutnant zur See Hepp the U-272 sank or damaged no ships.  
   
  Friday, November 13, 1942  
  The U-411, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Johann Spindlegger, was sunk by 4 depth charges from a British Hudson aircraft in the North Atlantic Ocean west of Gibraltar. All of the ship’s complement of 46 died. During its career under two commanders the U-411 sank or damaged no ships.  
   
  Sunday, November 15, 1942  
  The U-98, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Kurt Eichmann, was sunk by depth charges from the British destroyer HMS Wrestler (D 35) in North Atlantic Ocean west of Gibraltar. All of the ship’s complement of 46 died. During its career under three commanders the U-98 sank 1 auxiliary warship, damaged 1 warship, sank 10 merchant ships for a total of 48,878 tons.  
   
  Monday, November 16, 1942  
  The U-173, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Adolf Schweichel, was sunk by depth charges from the US destroyers USS Woolsey (DD 437), USS Swanson (DD 443) and USS Quick (DD 490) at Casablanca in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 57 died. During its career under two commanders the U-173 sank 1 auxiliary warship and damaged 1 warship and 2 auxiliary warships.  
   
  Saturday, November 21, 1942  
  The U-517, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Paul Hartwig, was sunk by depth charges from Albacore aircraft of the aircraft carrier HMS Victorious in the North Atlantic Ocean southwest of Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 52 survived. During its career under Kapitänleutnant Hartwig the U-517 sank 1 warship and sank 8 merchant ships for a total of 26,383 tons sunk.  
   
  The U-184, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Dangschat, was listed as missing in the North Atlantic Ocean east of Newfoundland. All of the ship’s complement of 50 died. During its career under Kapitänleutnant Dangschat the U-184 sank 1 merchant ship for a total of 3,192 tons.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Sunday, November 1, 1942  
  While proceeding under escort by two Free French corvettes the American steam merchant George Thatcher was torpedoed and sunk by the U-126, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Bauer, approximately 100 miles off the west coast of Africa in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 18 died and 48 survivors were picked up by the corvettes. The 7,176 ton George Thatcher was carrying Army ambulances, trucks, gasoline in drums, and road building equipment and was bound for Point Noire, French Equatorial Africa.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy TRIN-20, the British steam merchant Elmdale was torpedoed and sunk by the U-174, commanded by Ulrich Thilo, approximately 400 miles west of St. Paul’s Rocks in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 36 survivors were picked up by the Brazilian steam merchant Therezina M.. The 4,872 ton Elmdale was carrying coal, military stores, and general cargo and was bound for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  Monday, November 2, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Llandilo was torpedoed and sunk by the U-172, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Carl Emmermann, southeast of St. Helena in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 24 died and 20 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian merchant Olaf Bergh. The 4,966 ton Llandilo was carrying U.S. military stores and was bound for Bombay, India.  
   
  The unescorted Dutch motor passenger ship Zaandam was torpedoed and sunk by the U-174, commanded by Ulrich Thilo, approximately 300 miles north of Cape Sao Roque, Brazil in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 134 died and 165 survived. The 10,909 ton Zaandam was carrying copper and chrome ore and general cargo and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted Greek steam merchant Aegeus was torpedoed and sunk by the U-177, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Robert Gysae, off Cape Columbine, South Africa in the western Indian Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 29 died. The 4,538 ton Aegeus was carrying government stores and general cargo and was bound for Durban, South Africa.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-107, the British steam merchant Dalcroy was torpedoed and sunk by the U-402, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Siegfried von Forstner, approximately 500 miles east of Belle Isle, Newfoundland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 49 survived and were picked up by the British rescue ship Stockport. The 4,558 ton Dalcroy was carrying steel and timber and was bound for Tyne, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-107, the British steam merchant Empire Antelope was torpedoed and sunk by the U-402 approximately 500 miles east of Belle Isle. Of the ship’s complement, all 50 survived and were picked up by the British rescue ship Stockport. The 4,945 ton Empire Antelope was carrying general cargo, including steel and was bound for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-107, the British steam merchant Empire Leopard was torpedoed and sunk by the U-402 approximately 500 miles east of Belle Isle. Of the ship’s complement, 39 died and 3 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Stockport. The 5,676 ton Empire Leopard was carrying zinc concentrates and munitions and was bound for Avonmouth, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-107, the Greek steam merchant Rinos was torpedoed and sunk by the U-402 approximately 500 miles east of Belle Isle. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 23 survived. The 4,649 ton Rinos was carrying general cargo and vehicles and was bound for Hull, England.  
   
  The British steam merchant P.L.M. 27 was torpedoed and sunk by the U-518, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Friedrich-Wilhelm Wissmann, off Bell Island, Conception Bay, Newfoundland in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 42 survivors swam to shore. The 5,633 ton P.L.M. 27 was carrying iron ore and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The Canadian steam merchant Rose Castle was torpedoed and sunk by the U-518 off Bell Island. Of the ship’s complement, 23 died and 20 survivors were rescued by Canadian Fairmile motor launches. The 7,803 ton Rose Castle was carrying iron ore and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SC-107, the British steam merchant Hartington was torpedoed and sunk by the U-521, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Klaus Bargsten, approximately 450 miles east of Belle Isle, Newfoundland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The Hartington has been damaged earlier that day by a torpedo from the U-522. Of the ship’s complement, 24 died and 24 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Winchelsea (D 46). The 5,496 ton Hartington was carrying wheat and 6 tanks as deck cargo and was bound for Belfast, Ireland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-107, the British steam merchant Maritima was torpedoed and sunk by the U-522, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Schneider, approximately 500 miles northeast of St. John’s, Newfoundland in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 32 died and 27 survivors were picked up by the Canadian corvette HMCS Arvida (K 113). The 5,801 ton Maritima was carrying general cargo, including explosives and was bound for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-107, the Greek steam merchant Mount Pelion was torpedoed and sunk by the U-522 approximately 500 miles northeast of St. John’s. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 32 survived. The 5,655 ton Mount Pelion was carrying general cargo and motorized transports and was bound for Belfast Lough, Ireland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-107, the Greek steam merchant Parthenon was torpedoed and sunk by the U-522 approximately 500 miles northeast of St. John’s. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 23 survived. The 3,189 ton Parthenon was carrying general cargo and was bound for Mersey, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SC-107, the British steam merchant Empire Sunrise was torpedoed and sunk by the U-84, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Horst Uphoff, approximately 500 miles east of Belle Isle, Newfoundland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 51 survived and were picked up by the British rescue ship Stockport. The 7,459 ton Empire Sunrise was carrying steel and timber and was bound for Belfast, Ireland.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Empire Gilbert was torpedoed and sunk by the U-586, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Dietrich von der Esch, southwest of Jan Mayen Island in the Arctic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 64 died and 3 survivors landed ashore by the U-boat. The 6,640 ton Empire Gilbert was carrying war material, including tanks and aircraft and was bound for Archangel, Soviet Union.  
   
  Tuesday, November 3, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy TAG-18, the Canadian steam merchant Chr. J. Kampmann was torpedoed and sunk by the U-160, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg Lassen, northwest of Grenada in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 19 died and 8 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS Lea (DD 118). The 2,260 ton Chr. J. Kampmann was carrying sugar and rum and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy TAG-18, the British steam merchant Gypsum Empress was torpedoed and sunk by the U-160 west of Grenada. Of the ship’s complement, all 40 survived and were picked up by the Spanish steam tanker Gobeo. The 4,034 ton Gypsum Empress was carrying bauxite and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy TAG-18, the Panamanian motor tanker Leda was torpedoed and sunk by the U-160 west of Grenada. Of the ship’s complement, all 48 survived. The 8,546 ton Leda was carrying fuel oil and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy TAG-18, the Norwegian motor tanker Thorshavet was torpedoed and sunk by the U-160 north of Margarita Island off the coast of Venezuela. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 43 survivors were picked up by a destroyer. The 11,015 ton Thorshavet was carrying fuel oil and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The unescorted American motor merchant East Indian was torpedoed and sunk by the U-181, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wolfgang Lüth, approximately 300 miles southwest of the Cape of Good Hope, South Africa in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 58 died and 16 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Durando. The 8,159 ton East Indian was carrying manganese ore, tea, and general cargo and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-107, the American steam tanker Hahira was torpedoed and sunk by the U-521, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Klaus Bargsten, approximately 400 miles south of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 53 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Stockport. The 6,855 ton Hahira was carrying fuel oiand was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-107, the British steam merchant Jeypore was torpedoed and sunk by the U-89, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Dietrich Lohmann, south-southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 90 survivors were picked up by the American naval tugs Uncas and Pessacus. The 5,318 ton Jeypore was carrying general cargo, including explosives and was bound for Hull, England.  
   
  Wednesday, November 4, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Oued Grou was torpedoed and sunk by the U-126, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Bauer, southwest of Forcados in the Bight of Benin off the coast of central Africa in the southeastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 34 survivors eached land by lifeboat. The 792 ton Oued Grou was carrying ballast and was bound for Port Harcourt, Nigeria.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-107, the British steam merchant Empire Lynx was torpedoed and sunk by the U-132, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Vogelsang, approximately 500 miles southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 43 survived and were picked up by the Dutch merchant Titus. The 6,379 ton Empire Lynx was carrying general cargo and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-107, the Dutch steam merchant Hobbema was torpedoed and sunk by the U-132 approximately 500 miles southeast of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, 28 died and 16 survivors were picked up by the American tugs Uncas and Pessacus. The 5,507 ton Hobbema was carrying general cargo and ammunition and was bound for Belfast Lough, Ireland.  
   
  The unescorted American steam merchant William Clark was torpedoed and sunk by the U-354, commanded by Kapitänleutnant arl-Heinz Herbschleb, off Jan Mayen Island in the Arctic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 31 died and 40 survivors were picked up by the ASW trawlers HMS St. Elstan (FY 240) and HMS Cape Palliser (FY 256). The 7,176 ton William Clark was carrying lend-lease cargo, including tires, ammunition, tanks and aircraft as deck cargo and was bound for Murmansk, Soviet Union.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SC-107, the British steam merchant Hatimura was torpedoed and sunk by the U-442, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans-Joachim Hesse, approximately 500 miles southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 86 survivors were picked up by the American tugs Pessacus and Uncas. The 6,690 ton Hatimura was carrying general cargo, including TNT, gunpowder, and incendiary bombs and was bound for Manchester, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-107, the British steam merchant Daleby was torpedoed and sunk by the U-89, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Dietrich Lohmann, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 47 survived and were picked up by the Icelandic steam merchant Brúarfoss. The 4,640 ton Daleby was carrying grain, tanks, and motor parts and was bound for London, England.  
   
  The U.S. freighter John H. B. Latrobe, proceeding independently from Reykjavik, Iceland, to Archangel, Soviet Union, was attacked by HE 115 torpedo seaplane bombers in the Arctic Ocean. Armed Guard gunfire disrupts the attack by the enemy floatplanes and none of the seven torpedoes launched hit the ship. Strafing, however, slightly damaged the merchantman, and 3 of the 25-man Armed Guard were wounded. The John H.B. Latrobe returned to Reykjavik for repairs.  
   
  Thursday, November 5, 1942  
  Dispersed from Convoy TS-23, the British steam merchant New Toronto was torpedoed and sunk by the U-126, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Bauer, southeast of Kotonu, French West Adrica in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 102 survivors were picked up by the motor launch HMS ML-263. The 6,568 ton New Toronto was carrying African produce, including kernels, seeds, cotton, palm oil, Kapok, wolfram, tin, gold, and mail and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy TAG-18, the Norwegian motor tanker Astrell was torpedoed and sunk by the U-129, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Ludwig Witt, approximately 100 miles of the north coast of Curaçao in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 42 survivors were picked up by the Dutch motor torpedo boat HNMS TM-23 and the U.S. Coast Guard vessel USCGC CG-475. The 7,595 ton Astrell was carrying fuel oil and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy TAG-18, the American steam tanker Meton was torpedoed and sunk by the U-129 approximately 100 miles of the north coast of Curaçao Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 49 survivors were picked up by the Dutch motor torpedo boat. The 7,595 ton Meton was carrying bunker C fuel oil and was bound for Cienfuegos, Cuba.  
   
  The unescorted British motor merchant La Cordillera was torpedoed and sunk by the U-163, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Kurt-Eduard Engelmann, approximately 85 miles east of Barbados in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 38 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 5,185 ton La Cordillera was carrying ballast and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted Chulmleigh was bombed and damaged by a German Ju88 aircraft of II./KG 30 based at Banak, North Cape and beached at South Cape, Spitzbergen, Norway in the Arctic Ocean. The destruction of the Chulmleigh would be completed the next day by the U-625.  
   
  Friday, November 6, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy TRIN-24, the British steam merchant Arica was torpedoed and sunk by the U-160, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg Lassen, eight miles north of Galera Point, Trinidad in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 12 died and 55 survivors were picked up by the armed trawler HMS Lady Elsa (FY 124). The 5,431 ton Arica was carrying general cargo and mail and was bound for Demerara, British Guiana.  
   
  On 5 November 5, 1942, the unescorted Chulmleigh was bombed and damaged by a German Ju88 aircraft of II./KG 30 based at Banak, North Cape and beached at South Cape, Spitzbergen, Norway in the Arctic Ocean. On November 6, the U-625, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans Benker, torpedoed the stranded Chulmleigh and completed the destruction of the vessel with gunfire. Of the ship’s complement, 45 died and 13 survived. The 5,445 ton Chulmleigh was carrying government stores and was bound for Archangel, Soviet Union  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Empire Sky was torpedoed and sunk by the U-625 south of Spitzbergen, Norway. All of the ship’s complement of 41 died. The 7,455 ton Empire Sky was carrying government stores and was bound for Archangel, Soviet Union.  
   
  The unescorted British steam passenger ship City of Cairo was torpedoed and sunk by the U-68, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Karl-Friedrich Merten, in the middle of the South Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 104 died and 207 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchants Clan Alpine and Bendoran. The 8,034 ton City of Cairo was carrying passengers, general cargo, including pig iron, timber, wool, cotton, manganese ore, and boxes of silver coins and was bound for Pernambuco, Brazil.  
   
  Saturday, November 7, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Ocean Justice was torpedoed and sunk by the U-505, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Peter Zschech, east of Trinidad in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 56 survived and were picked up by the British motor torpedo boats. The 7,173 ton Ocean Justice was carrying manganese ore as ballast and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy TAG-19, the British steam merchant Lindenhall was torpedoed and sunk by the U-508, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg Staats, approximately 40 miles north of Margarita Island, Venezuela in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 42 died and 6 survivors were picked up by the corvette USS Surprise (PG 63). The 5,248 ton Lindenhall was carrying iron ore and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy TAG-19, the American steam merchant Nathaniel Hawthorne was torpedoed and sunk by the U-508 approximately 40 miles north of Margarita Island. Of the ship’s complement, 38 died and 14 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS Biddle (DD 151). The 7,176 ton Nathaniel Hawthorne was carrying bauxite ore and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ON-142, the unescorted British steam merchant Glenlea was torpedoed and sunk by the U-566, commanded by Gerhard Remus, north of the Azores in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 44 died and 15 survivors were picked up by the Norwegian merchant Thorstrand except for the master who was taken prisoner. The 4,252 ton Glenlea was carrying coal, general cargo, and trucks as deck cargo and was bound for Suez, Egypt.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ON-142, the British steam merchant Roxby was torpedoed and sunk by the U-613, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Köppe, southwest of Cape Clear, Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 34 died and 13 survivors were picked up by the Irish merchant Irish Beech. The 4,252 ton Roxby was carrying coal and was bound for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  
   
  Sunday, November 8, 1942  
  Dispersed from Convoy ON-138, the unescorted Norwegian motor merchant Maloja was torpedoed and sunk by the U-128, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Heyse, in the south central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 39 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Egyptian Prince. The 6,400 ton Maloja was carrying coal and 87 aircraft and was bound for Takoradi, Ghana.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant D´Entrecasteaux was torpedoed and sunk by the U-154, commanded by Heinrich Schuch, approximately 50 miles east of Barbados in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 63 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 7,291 ton D´Entrecasteaux was carrying general cargo, including copper and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ST-40, the American steam merchant West Humhaw was torpedoed and sunk by the U-161, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Albrecht Achilles, approximately 60 miles southwest of Takoradi, Ghana in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 59 survived and were picked up by the motor launch HMS ML-281. The 5,527 ton West Humhaw was carrying lubricating oil and general cargo, including cable drums and trucks as deck cargo and was bound for Lagos, Nigeria.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ST-40, the British steam merchant Benalder was torpedoed and damaged by the U-161 approximately 60 miles southwest of Takoradi. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 52 survived. The 5,161 ton Benalder was carrying military stores and was bound for Takoradi.  
   
  The unescorted British Steam merchant Capo Olmo was torpedoed and damaged by the U-67, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Müller-Stöckheim, north of Trinidad in the Caribbean. Of the ship’s complement, all 64 survived. The 4,712 ton Capo Olmo was carrying general cargo, copper, and zinc and was bound for Port of Spain.  
   
  Monday, November 9, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Nurmahal was torpedoed and sunk by the U-154, commanded by Heinrich Schuch, approximately 300 miles east of Martinique in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died. The 5,419 ton Nurmahal was carrying ballast and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Nidarland was torpedoed and sunk by the U-67, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Müller-Stöckheim, off Tobago in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 34 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 6,132 ton Nidarland was carrying zinc concentrate and silver and was bound for Baltimore, Maryland.  
   
  Tuesday, November 10, 1942  
  Dispersed from Convoy ON-141, the British steam merchant Cerinthus was torpedoed and sunk by the U-128, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Heyse, approximately 180 miles southwest from the Cape Verde Islands in the south central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 20 died and 20 survivors were picked up by the American steam merchant Kentuckian and the sloop HMS Bridgewater (L 01). The 3,878 ton Cerinthus was carrying ballast and was bound for Freetown, Sierra Leone.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy ON-141, the British steam merchant Start Point was torpedoed and sunk by the U-128 southwest from the Cape Verde Islands. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 45 survivors were picked up by the British merchant Eskdalegate except for the chief officer and chief engineer who were taken prisoner. The 5,293 ton Start Point was carrying coal and was bound for Freetown, Sierra Leone.  
   
  Wednesday, November 11, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant City of Ripon was torpedoed and sunk by the U-160, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg Lassen, approximately 90 miles northwest of Georgetown, British Guiana. Of the ship’s complement, 56 died and 22 survivors were picked up by the Brazilian steam merchant Midosi. The 6,368 ton City of Ripon was carrying sand as ballast and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Thursday, November 12, 1942  
  The unescorted Panamanian motor merchant Buchanan was torpedoed and sunk by the U-224, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Karl Kosbadt, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 73 survived and were picked up by the American motor merchant Lighting and by the destroyers HMS Leamington (G 19) and HMS Clare (I 14). The 5,614 ton Buchanan was carrying fuel oil in special tanks, U.S. mail, and a deck cargo of aircrafts and landing barges and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Friday, November 13, 1942  
  The unarmed American sailing ship Star of Scotland was sunk by gunfire by the U-159, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Witte, approximately 900 miles west of Lüderitz Bay, Southwest Africa in the south central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 16 survivors reached Santa Maria Lighthouse on December 1, having made a voyage of 1,040 miles. The 2,290 ton Star of Scotland was carrying sand ballast and was bound for Paranaguá, Brazil.  
   
  Saturday, November 14, 1942  
  The unescorted Panamanian steam merchant Scapa Flow was torpedoed and sunk by the U-134, commanded by Rudolf Schendel, in the south central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 33 died and 27 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Armeria (K 187). The 4,827 ton Scapa Flow was carrying manganese ore, latex in drums, and baled rubber and was bound for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy MKF-1X, the British troop transport Warwick Castle was torpedoed and sunk by the U-413, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Gustav Poel, approximately 200 miles northwest of Cape Espichel, Portugal in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 96 died and 366 survivors were picked up by the destroyers HMS Achates (H 12) and HMS Vansittart (D 64), the Canadian corvette HMCS Louisburg (K 143), and the British motor merchant Leinster. The 20,107 ton Warwick Castle was carrying ballast and was bound for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  Sunday, November 15, 1942  
  The unescorted British motor merchant King Arthur was torpedoed and sunk by the U-67, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Müller-Stöckheim, west of Trinidad in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 40 survived and were picked up by an American patrol ship. The 5,224 ton King Arthur was carrying general cargo and cotton and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Monday, November 16, 1942  
  The unescorted 5,621 ton Irish steam merchant Irish Pine was torpedoed and sunk by the U-608, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Rolf Struckmeier, in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 33 died.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy MKS-1X, the British steam merchant Clan Mactaggart was torpedoed and sunk by the U-92, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Adolf Oelrich, 50 miles southwest of Cadiz, Spain in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 169 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Coreopsis (K 32). The 7,622 ton Clan Mactaggart was carrying ballast and was bound for Clyde, United Kingdom.  
   
  Tuesday, November 17, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-144, the British steam merchant Widestone was torpedoed and sunk by the U-184, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Dangschat, approximately 500 miles southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 42 died. The 3,192 ton Widestone was carrying coal and was bound for St. John’s, Newfoundland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-144, the Greek steam merchant Mount Taurus was torpedoed and sunk by the U-264, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hartwig Looks, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 38 survived. The 6,696 ton Mount Taurus was carrying ballast and was bound for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant City of Corinth was torpedoed and sunk by the U-508, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg Staats, north of Trinidad in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 11 died and 76 survivors were picked up by the submarine chaser USS PC-536. The 5,318 ton City of Corinth was carrying general cargo, including tea, linseed, and pig iron and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Wednesday, November 18, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-144, the American steam merchant Yaka was torpedoed and sunk by the U-522, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Schneider, south-southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The Yaka had been damaged earlier that day by the U-624. Of the ship’s complement, all 52 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMS Vervain (K 190). The 5,432 ton Yaka was carrying ballast and was bound for Boston, Massachusetts.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-144, the American steam merchant Parismina was torpedoed and sunk by the U-624, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Graf Ulrich von Soden-Fraunhofen, south-southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 20 died and 55 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Perth and Norwegian corvette HNoMS Rose (K 102). The 4,732 ton Parismina was carrying sand ballast and was bound for Boston, Massachusetts.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-144, the British steam tanker President Sergent was torpedoed and sunk by the U-624 south-southeast of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, 20 died and 39 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Perth. The 5,344 ton President Sergent was carrying ballast and was bound for Trinidad.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian motor merchant Tortugas was torpedoed and sunk by the U-67, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Müller-Stöckheim, east of Barbados in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 38 survived and were picked up by the American steam merchant Herman F. Whiton, a Yugoslavian merchant or reached land by lifeboat. The 4,697 ton Tortugas was carrying general cargo, including manganese ore, jute, and tea and was bound for Clyde, United Kingdom.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-109, the American motor tanker Brilliant was torpedoed and damaged by the U-43, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Joachim Schwantke, in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 60 survived. The 9,131 ton Brilliant was carrying fuel oil and was bound for Belfast, Ireland. The ship ending sinking while being towed to Newfoundland.  
   
  Friday, November 20, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy KMS-3, the British steam merchant Grangepark was torpedoed and sunk by the U-263, commanded by Kurt Nölke, west of Gibraltar in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 67 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Fowey (L 15). The 5,132 ton Grangepark was carrying government stores and was bound for Oran, Algeria.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy KMS-3, the Norwegian motor merchant Prins Harald was torpedoed and sunk by the U-263 west of Gibraltar. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and the survivors were picked up by a rescue vessel. The 7,244 ton Prins Harald was carrying war material and was bound for North Africa.  
   
  Saturday, November 21, 1942  
  The unescorted Dutch motor merchant Bintang was torpedoed and sunk by the U-160, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg Lassen, approximately 650 miles east of Trinidad in the south central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 22 died and 51 survivors were picked up by the Spanish motor merchant Monte Altube, a US Navy patrol boat, the British motor merchant Rodsley, and the American Steam merchant Black Point. The 6,481 ton Bintang was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Empire Starling was torpedoed and sunk by the U-163, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Kurt-Eduard Engelmann, 180 miles northeast of Barbados in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 55 survived and reached land by lifeboat except for the master who was taken prisoner. The 6,060 ton Empire Starling was carrying frozen meat, including corned beef, and general cargo and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ON-145, the British motor merchant Empire Sailor was torpedoed and sunk by the U-518, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Friedrich-Wilhelm Wissmann, in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 23 died and 42 survivors were picked up by the Canadian corvette HMCS Timmins (K 223) and the Canadian minesweeper HMCS Minas (J 165). The 6,140 ton Empire Sailor was carrying general cargo, including phosgene bombs, and mustard gas in drums and was bound for St. John, New Brunswick.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ON-145, the British motor tanker British Promise was torpedoed and damaged by the U-518. Of the ship’s complement, all 61 survived. The 8,443 ton British Promise was carrying ballast and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ON-145, the British motor tanker British Renown was torpedoed and damaged by the U-518. Of the ship’s complement, all 50 survived. The 6,997 ton British Renown was carrying ballast and was bound for Curaçao, Dutch Caribbean.  
   
  Sunday, November 22, 1942  
  Dispersed from Convoy BRN-3, the Brazilian steam merchant Apalóide was torpedoed and sunk by the U-163, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Kurt-Eduard Engelmann, east of Trinidad in the south central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 51 survived. The 3,766 ton Apalóide was carrying coffee, castor seed, and general cargo and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Monday, November 23, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Benlomond was torpedoed and sunk by the U-172, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Carl Emmermann, approximately 750 miles east of the River Amazon, Brazil in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 53 died and 1 survived. The 6,630 ton Benlomond was carrying ballast and was bound for New York, New York. The sole survivor, the Chinese second mess steward Poon Lim, was rescued after an spending 133 days alone on a Carley raft by a Brazilian fishing vessel on 8 April 8, 1943.  
   
  The unescorted American turbine tanker Caddo was torpedoed and sunk by the U-518, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Friedrich-Wilhelm Wissmann, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 51 died and 8 survivors were picked up by the Spanish motor merchant Motomar. The 10,172 ton Caddo was carrying fuel oil and gasoline and was bound for Iceland.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy QP-15, the Soviet motor merchant Kuznets Lesov was torpedoed and sunk by the U-601, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Peter-Ottmar Grau, in the Arctic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 41 died. The 3,974 ton Kuznets Lesov was carrying potassium salt and was bound for Iceland.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy QP-15, the British steam merchant Goolistan was torpedoed and sunk by the U-625, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans Benker, west of Bear Island in the Arctic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 42 died. The 5,851 ton Goolistan was carrying ballast and was bound for Manchester, England.  
   
  Thursday, November 26, 1942  
  A straggler from Convoy HX-216, the British steam merchant Ocean Crusader was torpedoed and sunk by the U-262, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Heinz Franke, northeast of St. John’s, Newfoundland in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 45 died. The 7,178 ton Ocean Crusader was carrying general cargo and was bound for Avonmouth, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-110, the British steam merchant Barberrys was torpedoed and sunk by the U-663, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Schmid, northeast of St. John’s, Newfoundland in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 32 died inc luding the convoy’s commodore and 21 survivors were picked up by the U.S. Coast Guard cutter USCGC Mohawk (WPG 78). The 5,170 ton Barberrys was carrying general cargo and was bound for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian motor merchant Indra was torpedoed and sunk by the UD-3, commanded by Fregattenkapitän Hermann Rigele, in the south central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 39 survived and were picked up by the British motor merchant Eurybates. The 5,041 ton Indra was carrying ore and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Friday, November 27, 1942  
  Dispersed from Convoy ON-145, the Dutch steam merchant Polydorus was torpedoed and sunk by the U-176, commanded by Reiner Dierksen, northwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone in the south central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 80 survivors were picked up by the Spanish steam merchant Eolo. The 5,922 ton Polydorus was carrying military stores, including ammunition and was bound for Freetown.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Clan Macfadyen was torpedoed and sunk by the U-508, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg Staats, 95 miles southeast of Galeota Point, Trinidad in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 82 died and 10 survivors were picked up by the British Sailing ship Harvard or reached land by lifeboat/. The 6,191 ton Clan Macfadyen was carrying sugar, hemp, rum, and mail and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Saturday, November 28, 1942  
  The unescorted American steam merchant Alaskan was torpedoed and sunk by the U-172, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Carl Emmermann, approximately 800 miles northeast of Natal, Brazil in the south central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 50 survivors were picked up by the Spanish steam merchant Cilurnum or reached land by lifeboat. The 5,364 ton Alaskan was carrying chrome ore and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Empire Cromwell was torpedoed and sunk by the U-508, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg Staats, approximately 160 miles southeast of Galeota Point, Trinidad in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 24 died and 25 survivors were picked up by the British motor torpedo boats. The 5,970 ton Empire Cromwell was carrying chrome ore and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted British motor merchant Empire Glade was damaged by gunfire  by the U-67, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Müller-Stöckheim, off the coast of South America in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 47 survived. The 7,006 ton Empire Glade was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Sunday, November 29, 1942  
  Dispersed from Convoy ON-145, the Dutch Steam merchant Tjileboet was torpedoed and sunk by the U-161, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Albrecht Achilles, in the south central Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 62 died. The 5,760 ton Tjileboet was carrying general cargo, including food and ammunition and was bound for the Middle East.  
   
  Axis Merchant Shipping Losses  
  Sunday, November 8, 1942  
  The submarine USS Herring (SS 233), commanded by Lt. Commander Raymond W. Johnson, torpedoed and sank the 5,083 ton Vichy-French merchant Ville du Havre east of Casablanca, Morocco in the eastern Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  Wednesday, November 4, 1942  
  The submarines USS Shad (SS-235), USS Gunnel (SS-253), USS Herring (SS-233), USS Barb (SS-220), and USS Blackfish (SS-221) were deployed to reconnoiter French North African waters off Rabat, Fedala, Casablanca, Safi, and Dakar, in advance of Operation Torch.  
   
  Tuesday, November 10, 1942  
  The U-608, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Rolf Struckmeier, laid mines off New York City, east of Ambrose Light.  
   
  Thursday, November 12, 1942  
  Off French North Africa, a prize crew from the battleship USS New York (BB 34) took over the Vichy French auxiliary patrol vessel FS Victoria. A prize crew from the battleship USS Texas (BB 35) placed the scuttlrf Dutch freighter Export into service, and great strides were made in readying the merchantmen Paco, Nyhorn, and Fortunato for operation. The destroyer USS Quick (DD  490) placed a prize crew aboard the Vichy French merchantman Nancern.  
     
   
     
   
 

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