December 1942 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
  Overview  
  1 Allied warships was sunk by a U-boat.  
   
  3 U-boats were sunk by Allied warships.  
  1 U-boat was sunk by Allied aircraft.  
  1 U-boat was was lost in an accidental collision.  
   
  50 Allied merchant ships were sunk by U-boats totaling 267,478 tons.  
  3 Allied merchant ships were damaged by U-boats totaling 30,583 tons.  
   
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Thursday, December 17, 1942  
  While escorting Convoy ON-153 the HMS Firedrake (H 79) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-211, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Karl Hause, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 170 died and 26 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Sunflower (K 41).  
   
  Wednesday, December 30, 1942  
  The Battle of the Barents Sea began as the German heavy cruisers SMS Admiral Hipper and SMS Lutzow, escorted by 6 destroyers, left their anchorage to intercept the Arctic convoy JW-51B, a 14-ship convoy escorted by seven destroyers and five other warships, bound for Kola, Soviet Union.  
   
  Thursday, December 31, 1942  
  The Battle of the Barents Sea occurred. The German heavy cruiser SMS Admiral Hipper and SMS Lutzow approached Convoy JW51-B independently. The British convoy escort used smoke screens and the threat of torpedo attack to keep the German vessels at an ineffective distance. One British destroyer was sunk and one was severely damaged. British cruisers intervened during the third interception attempt by the German heavy cruiser SMS Admiral Hipper, damaging the ship and sinking a German destroyer after which the German force withdrew.  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  Tuesday, December 8, 1942  
  The U-611, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Nikolaus von Jacobs, was sunk by depth charges from a British B-24 Liberator aircraft in the Northern Atlantic Ocean southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland. All of the ship’s complement of 45 died. During its career under Kapitänleutnant von Jacobs the U-611 sank or damaged no ships.  
   
  The U-254, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Odo Loewe, was sunk after a collision with the U-221 in the Northern Atlantic Ocean southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland. Of the ship’s complement, 41 died and 4 survived. During its career under two commanders the U-254 sank 3 merchant ships for a total of 18,553 tons.  
   
  Tuesday, December 15, 1942  
  The U-626, commanded by Leutnant zur See Hans-Botho Bade, was sunk by depth charges from the coastguard cutter USS Ingham in the North Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 47 died. During its career under Leutnant zur See Bade the U-626 sank or damaged no ships.  
   
  Saturday, December 26, 1942  
  The U-357, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Adolf Kellner, was sunk by depth charges from the British destroyers HMS Hesperus (H 57) and HMS Vanessa (D 29) in the North Atlantic Ocean northwest of Ireland. Of the ship’s complement, 36 died and 6 survived. During its career under Kapitänleutnant Kellner the U-357 sank or damaged no ships.  
   
  Sunday, December 27, 1942  
  The U-356, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Günther Ruppelt, was sunk by depth charges from the Canadian destroyer HMCS St. Laurent (H 83) and the Canadian corvettes HMCS Chilliwack (K 131), HMCS Battleford (K 165) and HMCS Napanee (K 118) in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean north of the Azores. All of the ship’s complement of 46 died. During its career under two commanders the U-356 sank 3 merchant ships for a total of 13,649 tons, and damaged 1 merchant ship for a total of 7,051 tons.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Tuesday, December 1, 1942  
  The unescorted British motor merchant Trevalgan was torpedoed and sunk by the U-508, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg Staats, southeast of Trinidad in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 43 survived and were picked up by the patrol craft USS PC-572. The 5,299 ton Trevalgan was carrying ballast and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Wednesday, December 2, 1942  
  The Norwegian motor merchant Besholt was torpedoed and sunk by the U-174, commanded by Ulrich Thilo, off the coast of South America in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and 28 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 4,977 ton Besholt was carrying copper, tin, palmoil, and mail and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant City of Bath was torpedoed and sunk by the U-508, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg Staats, northwest of Georgetown, British Guiana in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 80 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant City of Dunkirk or reached land by lifeboat. The 5,079 ton City of Bath was carrying general, including copper ingots, magnesite ore, chrome ore, and mail and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy MKF-3, the American steam passenger ship Coamo was torpedoed and sunk by the U-604, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Horst Höltring, west of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 186 died. The 7,057 ton Coamo was bound for New York, New York. This was the greatest single loss of a merchant crew on any U.S. Flag merchant vessel during the World War II.  
   
  Thursday, December 3, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-146, the British steam merchant Empire Dabchick was torpedoed and sunk by the U-183, commanded by Heinrich Schäfer, approximately 200 miles southeast of Sable Island, Nova Scotia in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 47 died. The 6,089 ton Empire Dabchick was carrying ballast and was bound for St. John, New Brunswick.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Solon II was torpedoed and sunk by the U-508, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg Staats, northeast of Georgetown, British Guiana in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 75 died and 7 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 4,561 ton Solon II was carrying manganese ore and copper and was bound for Baltimore, Maryland.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy ON-146, the British steam merchant Wallsend was torpedoed and sunk by the U-552, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Klaus Popp, north of the Cape Verde Islands in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 37 survivors reached land by lifeboat except for the master who was taken prisoner. The 3,157 ton Wallsend was carrying cement, coal, 15 aircraft, and mail and was bound for Freetown, Sierra Leone.  
   
  Saturday, December 5, 1942  
  The unescorted British motor merchant Teesbank was torpedoed and sunk by the U-128, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Heyse, north of St. Paul’s Rocks in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 61 survivors were picked up by the American steam tanker Bessemer and the British Steam merchant East Wales except for the master who was taken prisoner. The 5,136 ton Teesbank was carrying ballast and was bound for Demerara, British Guiana.  
   
  Sunday, December 6, 1942  
  Dispersed from Convoy ON-149, the British motor merchant Henry Stanley was torpedoed and sunk by the U-103, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Gustav-Adolf Janssen, approximately 580 miles northwest of the Azores in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 63 died. The lone survivor was the master who was taken prisoner. The 5,025 ton Henry Stanley was carrying passengers, general cargo, including explosives and mail and was bound for Lagos, Nigeria.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy ON-149, the Dutch steam merchant Serooskerk was torpedoed and sunk by the U-155, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Adolf Cornelius Piening, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 83 died. The 8,456 ton Serooskerk was carrying general cargo and military stores and was bound for Calcutta, India.  
   
  Monday, December 7, 1942  
  The unescorted British motor merchant Peter Mærsk was torpedoed and sunk by the U-185, commanded by Kapitänleutnant August Maus, west of the Azores in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 67 died. The 5,476 ton Peter Mærsk was carrying government stores and general cargo and was bound for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  Dispersed from Convoy ON-149, the British steam passenger ship Ceramic was torpedoed and sunk by the U-515, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Henke, west of the Azores in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers which included 264 crew members, 14 gunners, 244 military and naval passengers (mostly nurses of the Queen Alexandra´s Imperial Military Nursing Service) and 133 fare paying passengers, among them 12 children, 656 died. The lone survivor was taken prisoner by the U-boat. The 18,713 ton Ceramic was carrying passengers, general cargo, and government stores and was bound for Sydney, Australia.  
   
  Tuesday, December 8, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy HX-217, the British motor tanker Empire Spenser was torpedoed and sunk by the U-524, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Walter von Steinaecker, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1D died and 57 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Perth. The 8,194 ton Empire Spenser was carrying motor fuel and was bound for Stanlow, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-217, the American steam merchant James McKay was torpedoed and sunk by the U-600, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Bernhard Zurmühlen, approximately 425 miles south of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 62 died. The 6,762 ton James McKay was carrying general cargo and was bound for Belfast, Ireland.  
   
  Wednesday, December 9, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Nigerian was torpedoed and sunk by the U-508, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg Staats, approximately 130 miles southeast of Trinidad in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 56 survivors were picked up by the patrol craft USS PC-624, the Panamanian steam merchant Maravi or reached land by lifeboat. The 5,423 ton Nigerian was carrying palm oil seed, timber, cocoa, and peanut oil and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy HX-217, the British motor merchant Charles L.D. was torpedoed and sunk by the U-553, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Karl Thurmann, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 36 died and 12 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Perth. The 5,273 ton Charles L.D. was carrying general cargo and was bound for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  Saturday, December 12, 1942  
  The unescorted motor steam merchant Ripley was torpedoed and sunk by the U-161, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Albrecht Achilles, southwest of St. Paul’s Rocks in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 41 survived and were picked up by the British steam merchant Royal Star or reached land by lifeboat. The 4,997 ton Ripley was carrying palm oil, mahogany, and rubber and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Sunday, December 13, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant City of Bombay was torpedoed and sunk by the U-159, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Witte, south of St. Paul’s Rocks in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 24 died and 130 survivors were picked up by the Egyptian steam merchant Star of Cairo, the British steam merchant Cape Breton and the corvette USS Tenacity (PG 71). The 7,140 ton City of Bombay was carrying passengers, military stores, including weapons, ammunition, and 10 aircraft and was bound for Karachi, India.  
   
  The Swedish motor merchant Scania was stopped and after the crew abandoned ship was scuttled by the U-176, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Reiner Dierksen, in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 25 survived and were picked up by the Swedish motor merchant Nordstjernan. The 1,629 ton Scania was carrying salted hides, wool, and salted hides in barrels and was bound for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Hororata was torpedoed and damaged by the U-103, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Gustav-Adolf Janssen, north of the Azores in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 82 survived. The 13,945 ton Hororata was carrying refrigerated and general cargo and was bound for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Monday, December 14, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Orfor was torpedoed and sunk by the U-105, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Jürgen Nissen, northeast of Barbados in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 22 died and 39 survivors were picked up by the armed yacht HMS Black Bear (FY 046) or reached land by lifeboat. The 6,578 ton Orfor was carrying jute fiber and was bound for Ciudad Trujillo, Dominican Republic.  
   
  The neutral Swedish steam merchant Etna was stopped and after the crew abandoned ship was torpedoed and sunk by the U-217, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Kurt Reichenbach-Klinke, in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 27 survived. The 2,619 ton Etna was carrying general cargo and mail and was bound for Montevideo, Uruguay.  
   
  Tuesday, December 15, 1942  
  The unescorted Egyptian steam merchant Star of Suez was torpedoed and sunk by the U-159, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Witte, in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 40 survived. The 4,999 ton Star of Suez was carrying war materials, including explosives, paper, and replacement parts for aircraft and trucks and was bound for Suez, Egypt.  
   
  The American steam merchant Alcoa Rambler was torpedoed and sunk by the U-174, commanded by Ulrich Thilo, 200 miles northeast of Natal, Brazil in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 54 survived. The 5,500 ton Alcoa Rambler was carrying coal and was bound for Santos, Brazil.  
   
  Wednesday, December 16, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant East Wales was torpedoed and sunk by the U-159, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Witte, near St. Paul’s Rocks in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 17 died and 28 survivors were picked up by the Swedish motor merchant Gullmaren. The 4,358 ton East Wales was carrying government stores and coal and was bound for Alexandria, Egypt.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Observer was torpedoed and sunk by the U-176, commanded by Reiner Dierksen, approximately 350 miles east of Cabo Sao Roque, Brazil in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 66 died and 15 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 5,881 ton Observer was carrying chrome ore and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ON-153, the Norwegian motor tanker Bello was torpedoed and sunk by the U-610, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Walter von Freyberg-Eisenberg-Allmendingen, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 33 died and 7 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Pink (K 137). The 6,125 ton Bello was carrying ballast and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy UGS-72 the 9,551 ton Regent Lion, the British motor tanker was torpedoed and damaged by the U-610 in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 45 survived.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ON-153, the Belgian steam merchant Emile Francqui was torpedoed and sunk by the U-664, commanded by Adolf Graef, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 46 died and 41 survived. The 5,859 ton Emile Francqui was carrying stores and was bound for St. John, New Brunswick.  
   
  Thursday, December 17, 1942  
  The 310 ton French steam trawler Poitou was torpedoed and sunk by the U-432, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz-Otto Schultze, off the coast of Morocco in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 20 died and 2 survived.  
   
  Friday, December 18, 1942  
  A straggler from Convoy MKS-3Y, the British steam merchant Bretwalda was torpedoed and sunk by the U-563, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Götz von Hartmann, approximately 330 miles west-northwest of Cape Finisterre, Spain in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 55 survivors were picked up by the Polish destroyer ORP Krakowiak (L 115). The 4,906 ton Bretwalda was carrying ballast and was bound for Belfast, Ireland.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ONS-152, the Greek steam merchant Oropos was torpedoed and sunk by the U-621, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Max Kruschka, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 34 died. The 4,474 ton Oropos was bound for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  
   
  Sunday, December 20, 1942  
  A straggler from Convoy ONS-152, the British motor tanker Otina was torpedoed and sunk by the U-621, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Max Kruschka, west of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 60 died. The 6,217 ton Otina was carrying ballast and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Monday, December 21, 1942  
  A straggler from Convoy ONS-152, the British steam merchant Montreal City was torpedoed and sunk by the U-591, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Jürgen Zetzsche, northeast of Cape Race, Newfoundland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 39 died. The 3,066 ton Montreal City was carrying general cargo, including china clay and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Sunday, December 27, 1942  
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-154, the British steam merchant Empire Union was torpedoed and sunk by the U-356, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Günther Ruppelt, north-northeast of the Azores in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 63 survived and were picked up by the British rescue ship Toward. The 5,952 ton Empire Union was carrying general cargo, including government stores and was bound for St. John, New Brunswick.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-154, the British steam merchant King Edward was torpedoed and sunk by the U-356 north-northeast of the Azores. Of the ship’s complement, 23 died and 25 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Toward and the Canadian corvette HMCS Napanee (K 118). The 5,224 ton King Edward was carrying ballast and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-154, the British steam merchant Melrose Abbey was torpedoed and sunk by the U-356 north-northeast of the Azores. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 27 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Toward. The 5,224 ton Melrose Abbey was carrying coal and 70 bags of mail and was bound for Trinidad.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ONS-154, the Dutch steam merchant Soekaboemi was torpedoed and sunk by the U-441, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Klaus Hartmann, north-northeast of the Azores in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 69 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Toward and the Canadian corvette  HMCS Napanee (K 118). The 7,051 ton Soekaboemi was carrying general cargo and was bound for Bombay, India.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ONS-154, the British steam tanker Scottish Heather was torpedoed and damaged by the U-225, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Wolfgang Leimkühler, north-northeast of the Azores. Of the ship’s complement, all 54 survived. The 7,087 ton Scottish Heather was carrying ballast and 750 tons of fuel for the escorts and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted British motor merchant Oakbank was torpedoed and sunk by the U-507, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Harro Schacht, approximately 200 miles north-northeast of Fortaleza, Brazil in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 27 died and 37 survivors were picked up by the Brazilian steam merchant Comandante Ripper, the Argentinian steam tanker Juvenal or reached land by lifeboat. The 5,154 ton Oakbank was carrying ballast and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Monday, December 28, 1942  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Treworlas was torpedoed and sunk by the U-124, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Johann Mohr, approximately 50 miles east of Port of Spain, Trinidad in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 38 died and 9 survivors were picked up by the patrol craft USS PC-609. The 4,692 ton Treworlas was carrying manganese ore and was bound for Baltimore, Baltimore.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-154, the British steam merchant Melmore Head was torpedoed and sunk by the U-225, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Wolfgang Leimkühler, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and 35 survivors were picked up by the Canadian corvette HMCS Shediac (K 110). The 5,273 ton Melmore Head was carrying ballast and was bound for St. John, New Brunswick.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-154, the British steam merchant Empire Wagtail was torpedoed and sunk by the U-260, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hubertus Purkhold, about 900 miles west of Cape Finisterre, Spain in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 39 died. The 4,893 ton Empire Wagtail was carrying coal and was bound for Boston, Massachusetts.  
   
  Tuesday, December 29, 1942  
  A straggler from Convoy ONS-154, the British steam merchant Baron Cochrane was torpedoed and sunk by the U-123, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Horst von Schroeter, northwest of the Azores in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 42 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Milne (G 14). The 3,385 ton Baron Cochrane was carrying coal and was bound for Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ONS-154, the Belgian motor tanker President Francqui was torpedoed and sunk by the U-336, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans Hunger, north of the Azores in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 52 survived. The 4,919 ton President Francqui was carrying ballast and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ONS-154, the British catapult armed merchant Empire Shackleton was torpedoed and sunk by the U-435, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Siegfried Strelow, north of the Azores in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 69 survived and were picked up by the HMS Fidelity (D 57), the Canadian corvette HMCS Shediac (K 110) and the British merchant Calgary. The 7,068 ton Empire Shackleton was carrying general cargo, ammunition, and aircraft and was bound for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ONS-154, the Norwegian steam merchant Norse King was torpedoed and sunk by the U-435 north-northeast of the Azores. All of the ship’s complement of 35 died. The 5,701 ton Norse King was carrying coal and was bound for Boston, Massachusetts.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ONS-154, the British steam merchant Zarian was torpedoed and sunk by the U-591, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Jürgen Zetzsche, northwest of the Azores in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 49 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Milne (G 14). The 4,871 ton Zarian was carrying general cargo and government stores and was bound for Takoradi, Ghana.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ONS-154, the British steam merchant Lynton Grange was torpedoed and sunk by the U-628, commanded by Heinrich Hasenschar, northwest of the Azores in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 52 survived and were picked up by the destroyer HMS Milne (G 14). The 5,029 ton Lynton Grange was carrying government stores and general cargo and was bound for the Middle East.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ONS-156, the Norwegian steam merchant Ingerfem was torpedoed and sunk by the U-631, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Jürgen Krüger, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 40 died and 1 survivor was picked up by the American steam merchant Staghound. The 3,978 ton Ingerfem was carrying ballast and was bound for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ONS-154, the British steam merchant Ville de Rouen was torpedoed and sunk by the U-662, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Wolfgang Hermann, north of the Azores in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 71 survived and were picked up by the Canadian corvette HMCS Shediac (K 110). The 5,598 ton Ville de Rouen was carrying general cargo and was bound for Beira, Mozambique.  
   
  Wednesday, December 30, 1942  
  A straggler from Convoy ONS-154, the British special service vessel HMS Fidelity (D 57) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-435, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Siegfried Strelow, north of the Azores in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 369 died and 10 survivors were picked up by the Canadian corvette HMCS Woodstock (K 238) and the Canadian destroyer HMCS St Laurent (H 83). The 2,456 ton HMS Fidelity was carrying commandos and two landing craft and was bound for Colombo, India.  
   
  The unescorted Polish motor merchant Paderewski was torpedoed and sunk by the U-214, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Reeder, approximately 40 miles off Trinidad in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 38 survivors were picked up by the fishing boat and two American patrol boats. The 4,426 ton Paderewski was carrying general cargo and was bound for Port of Spain, Trinidad.  
   
  Axis Merchant Shipping Losses  
  xx.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  xx.  
     
   
     
   
 

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