February 1943 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
 
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Thursday, February 4, 1943  
  Information carelessly provided by the sole survivor of the Cordelia who was picked after the U-632 torpedoed and sank the British motor tanker Cordelia was used by the BdU Operationsabteilung, the U-boat Tactical Command based in France, to home in on convoy SC-118.  
   
  Sunday, February 7, 1943  
  The Soviet submarine K-22 struck a mine and sank near the Kongsfjord, northern Norway in the northern Atlantic Ocean while on her 8th war patrol.  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  Wednesday, February 3, 1943  
  The U-265, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Leonhard Auffhammer, was sunk south of Iceland by depth charges from an RAF 220 Squadron B-17 Fortress aircraft. All 46 of the crew died. During its career under Oberleutnant zur See Auffhammer the U-265 sank or damaged no ships.  
   
  Thursday, February 4, 1943  
  The U-187, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ralph Münnich, was sunk in the northern Atlantic Ocean by depth charges from the destroyers HMS Vimy and (D 33) and HMS Beverley (H 64). 9 of the crew died and 45 survivors were picked up. During its career under Kapitänleutnant Münnich the U-187 sank or damaged no ships.  
   
  The U-414, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Walther Huth, was attacked in the northern Atlantic Ocean by a Curtiss aircraft and damaged so badly that she had to return to base.  
   
  Friday, February 5, 1943  
  The U-267, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Otto Tinschert, was attacked in the North Atlantic Ocean by escorts with depth charges. The boat was damaged so severely that it had to return to base, reaching St. Nazaire on February 18.  
   
  Saturday, February 6, 1943  
  The U-403 was strafed and attacked with 6 bombs by a Canadian Canso aircraft from RCAF Squadron 5 off Newfoundland in the western Atlantic Ocean and received moderate damage.  
   
  Sunday, February 7, 1943  
  The U-609, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Klaus Rudloff, was sunk in the northern Atlantic Ocean, by depth charges from the Free French corvette FFL Lobelia (K 05). Of the 47 man crew, all hands were lost. During its career under Kapitänleutnant Rudloff the U-609 sank 2 merchant ships for a total of 10,288 tons.  
   
  The U-624, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Graf Ulrich von Soden-Fraunhofen, was sunk in the northern Atlantic Ocean, by depth charges from an RAF 220 Squadron B-17 Fortress. Of the 45 man crew, all hands were lost. During its career under Kapitänleutnant von Soden-Fraunhofen the U-624 sank 3 warships, sank or 5 merchant ships for a total of 39,855 tons, and damaged 1 merchant ship for a total of 5,432 tons.  
   
  Friday, February 12, 1943  
  The U-442, commanded by Fregattenkapitän Hans-Joachim Hesse, was sunk by depth charges from a British Hudson aircraft west of Cape St. Vincent, Portugal in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 48 died. During its career under Fregattenkapitän Hesse the U-442 sank 2 merchant ships for a total of 10,288 tons.  
   
  Saturday, February 13, 1943  
  The U-620, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz Stein, was sunk by 5 depth charges from a British Catalina aircraft north-west of Lisbon, Portugal in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 48 died. During its career under Kapitänleutnant Stein the U-620 sank 1 merchant ship for a total of 6,983 tons.  
   
  Monday, February 15, 1943  
  The U-201, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Günther Rosenberg, was sunk by depth charges from the British destroyer HMS Viscount (D 92) in North Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 49 died. During its career under two commanders the U-201 sank 2 auxiliary warships, sank 22 merchant ships for a total of 102,697 tons, and damaged 2 merchant ship for a total of 13,386 tons.  
   
  The U-529, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg-Werner Fraatz, was sunk by depth charges from a British B-24 Liberator aircraft in the North Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 48 died. During its career under Kapitänleutnant Fraatz the U-529 sank or damaged no ships.  
   
  Wednesday, February 17, 1943  
  The U-69, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Gräf, was sunk by depth charges from the British destroyer HMS Fame (H 68) in the North Atlantic Ocean east of Newfoundland. All of the ship’s complement of 46 died. During its career under two commanders the U-69 sank or damaged irreparably 18 merchant ships for a total of 72,960 tons, and damaged 1 merchant ship for a total of 4,887 tons.  
   
  Friday, February 19, 1943  
  The U-268, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Ernst Heydemann, was sunk by depth charges from a British Wellington aircraft in the Bay of Biscay west of Nantes, France. All of the ship’s complement of 44 died. During its career under Oberleutnant zur See Heydemann the U-268 sank 1 merchant ship for a total of 14,547 tons.  
   
  Sunday, February 21, 1943  
  The U-623, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hermann Schröder, was sunk by 6 depth charges from a British Liberator aircraft in the North Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 46 died. During its career under Oberleutnant zur See Schröder the U-623 sank or damaged no ships.  
   
  Monday, February 22, 1943  
  The U-225, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Wolfgang Leimkühler, was sunk by depth charges from the British corvette HMS Dianthus in the North Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 46 died. During its career under Oberleutnant zur See Leimkühler the U-225 sank 1 merchant ship for a total of 5,273 tons, and damaged 4 merchant ships for a total of 24,672 tons.  
   
  The U-606, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Heinrich Döhler, was sunk by depth charges from the U.S. Coast Guard cutter USCGC Campbell and the Polish destroyer Burza in the North Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 36 died and 11 survived. During its career under Oberleutnant zur Döhler the U-606 sank or damaged irreparably 3 merchant ships for a total of 20,527 tons, and damaged 2 merchant ships for a total of 21,925 tons.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Monday, February 1, 1943  
  The French motor fishing vessel Joseph Elise was shelled and sunk off the western coast of Africa in the eastern Atlantic Ocean by the U-66, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Friedrich Markworth, after a torpedo had missed. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 11 survived.  
   
  Wednesday, February 3, 1943  
  Sailing with Convoy SG-19, the American steam passenger ship Dorchester was torpedoed and sunk by the U-223, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Karl-Jürg Wächter, south of Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 675 died and 229 survivors were picked up by the U.S. coast guard cutters USCGC Escanaba (WPG 77) and USCGC Comanche (WPG 76) and USCGC Tampa (WPG 48). The sinking is best known for the Four Chaplains. They helped other soldiers board lifeboats and gave up their own life jackets when the supply ran out. The chaplains joined arms, said prayers, and sang hymns as they went down with the ship. The chaplains, who all held the rank of lieutenant, were the Methodist Reverend George L. Fox, Rabbi Alexander D. Goode, the Roman Catholic Priest John P. Washington and the Reformed Church in America Reverend Clark V. Poling. The 5,649 ton Dorchester was carrying mail and parcel post, lumber and general cargo as well as the troops and was headed for Narsarssuak, Greenland. There are many memorials to the Four Chaplains including the stained glass depiction (left) at the Heroes Chapel Window in the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C.  
   
  The British motor tanker Cordelia was torpedoed and sunk by the U-632, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans Karpf, location south of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All but one of the ship’s complement of 47 died. The sole survivor, chief engineer I.C. Bingham, was taken prisoner by the U-boat and carelessly mentioned the convoy SC-118 which was reported to BdU Operationsabteilung, the U-boat Tactical Command based in France. The convoy was subsequently attacked with the loss of nine ships. The survivor landed at Brest on 14 February and was taken to the German POW camp Milag Nord. The 8,190 ton Cordelia was carrying Admiralty fuel oil and was headed for Clyde, United Kingdom.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Rhexenor was torpedoed and sunk by the U-217, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Kurt Reichenbach-Klinke, southeast of Bermuda in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 67 survivors were picked up by the armed yacht HMS Conqueror or made landfall in lifeboats. The 7,957 ton Rhexenor was carrying cocoa beans and was headed for England.  
   
  Friday, February 5, 1943  
  A straggler from Convoy SC-118, the American steam merchant West Portal was torpedoed and sunk by the U-413, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Gustav Poel, location. All of the ship’s complement of 77 died. The 5,376 ton West Portal was carrying general cargo, army stores, and mail and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Saturday, February 6, 1943  
  A straggler from Convoy SC-118, the Polish steam merchant Zagloba was torpedoed and sunk by the U-262, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Heinz Franke, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 26 died. The 2,864 ton Zagloba was carrying general cargo and was headed for Manchester, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy SC-118, the Greek steam merchant Polyktor was torpedoed and sunk by the U-266, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ralf von Jessen, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement died except for the master and one crew member, who were taken prisoner by the U-266. The 4,077 ton Polyktor was carrying grain and government stores and was headed for Avonmouth, England.  
   
  Sunday, February 7, 1943  
  Sailing with Convoy SC-118, the British motor merchant Afrika was torpedoed and sunk by the U-402, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Siegfried von Forstner, southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 23 died and 37 survivors were picked up by the corvettes HMS Campanula (K 18) and HMS Mignonette (K 38). The 8,597 ton Afrika was carrying steel, government and general cargo, including grain and explosives and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-118, the Greek steam merchant Kalliopi was torpedoed and sunk by the U-402 southeast of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and there were 320 survivors. The 4,965 ton Kalliopi was carrying steel and lumber and was headed for London, England.  
   
  Axis Merchant Shipping Losses  
  xx.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  xx.  
     
   
     
   
 

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