May 1943 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
 
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Tuesday, May 4, 1943  
  After sailing for a week through raging storms, the westbound convoy ONS-5 made contact with the German wolf pack sent to destroy it.  
   
  Wednesday, May 5, 1943  
  Convoy ONS-5, now being hunted by over 20 German submarines, began to take serious losses. Convoy ONS-5 was a slow west-bound North Atlantic convoy of the ONS series. It consisted of 42 ships bound from Liverpool, England to Halifax, Nova Scotia with the ships either in ballast or carrying trade and export goods.  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  xx.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Saturday, May 1, 1943  
  The unescorted British motor merchant Port Victor was torpedoed and sunk by the U-107, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Harald Gelhaus, northeast of the Azores in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 19 died and 145 survivors were picked up by the sloop HMS Wren (U 28). The 12,411 ton Port Victor was carrying passengers, refrigerated foodstuffs, and general cargo and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  The unescorted Greek steam merchant Adelfotis was torpedoed and then sunk by gunfire by the U-182, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Asmus Nicolai Clausen, southeast of St. Paul’s Rock in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 36 survived. The 5,838 ton Adelfotis was carrying linseed and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy TS-37, the British steam merchant City of Singapore was torpedoed and sunk by the U-515, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Henke, approximately 75 miles southwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 97 survived and were picked up by the minesweeping trawler HMS Arran (T 06) and the anti-submarine trawler HMS Birdlip (T 218). The 6,555 ton City of Singapore was carrying general cargo, including pig iron, jute, linseed, groundnuts, and mail and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy TS-37, the British steam merchant Clan Macpherson was torpedoed and sunk by the U-515 approximately 75 miles southwest of Freetown. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 136 survivors were picked up by the minesweeping trawler HMS Arran (T 06). The 6,940 ton Clan Macpherson was carrying general cargo, including pig iron, linseed, tea, jute, mica, and groundnuts and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy TS-37, the Belgian motor merchant Mokambo was torpedoed and damaged by the U-515 approximately 75 miles southwest of Freetown. Of the ship’s complement, all 57 survived. The 4,996 ton Mokambo was carrying cotton, copper, palm kernels, palm oil, copal, and wolframite and was headed for the Liverpool, England. The Mokambo was towed to Freetown roads by the tugs HMS Aimwell (W 113) and HMS Oriana (W 117), but capsized the next day and sank.  
   
  Tuesday, May 4, 1943  
  A straggler from Convoy ONS-5, the British steam merchant Lorient was torpedoed and sunk by the U-125, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ulrich Folkers, south of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 40 died. The 4,737 ton Lorient was carrying ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy NK-538, the Panamanian motor tanker Panam was torpedoed and sunk by the U-129, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Hans-Ludwig Witt, off the coast of North Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 49 survivors were picked up by the submarine chaser USS SC-664. The 7,277 ton Panam was carrying ballast and was headed for Lake Charles, Louisiana.  
   
  Wednesday, May 5, 1943  
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-5, the British steam merchant Harperley was torpedoed and sunk by the U-264, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hartwig Looks, south of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 10 died and 39 survivors were picked up by the ASW trawler HMS Northern Spray (FY 129). The 4,586 ton Harperley was carrying coal and bags of mail and was headed for Buenos Aires, Argentina.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-5, the American steam merchant West Maximus was torpedoed and sunk by the U-264 south of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 56 survivors were picked up by the ASW trawler HMS Northern Spray (FY 129). The 4,586 ton West Maximus was carrying sand ballast and was headed for Boston, Massachusetts.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-5, the Norwegian steam merchant Bonde was torpedoed and sunk by the U-266, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ralf von Jessen, south of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and 12 survivors were picked up by the frigate HMS Tay (K 232). The 1,570 ton Bonde was carrying coal.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-5, the British steam merchant Gharinda was torpedoed and sunk by the U-266 south of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, all 92 survived and were picked up by the frigate HMS Tay (K 232). The 5,306 ton Gharinda was carrying ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-5, the British steam merchant Selvistan was torpedoed and sunk by the U-266, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ralf von Jessen, south of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 40 survivors were picked up by the frigate HMS Tay (K 232). The 5,136 ton Selvistan was carrying ballast and was headed for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-5, the British steam merchant Bristol City was torpedoed and sunk by the U-358, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Rolf Manke, south of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 15 died and 34 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Loosestrife (K 105). The 2,864 ton Bristol City was carrying general cargo, including china clay and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-5, the British steam merchant Wentworth was torpedoed and sunk by the U-358 south of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 42 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Loosestrife (K 105). The 2,864 ton Wentworth was carrying ballast and was headed for Macoris, Cuba.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ONS-5, the American steam merchant West Madaket was torpedoed and sunk by the U-584, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Joachim Deecke, south of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 61 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMS Pink (K 137). The 5,565 ton West Madaket was carrying sand and water ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-5, the British steam merchant Harbury was torpedoed and sunk by the U-628, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Hasenschar, south of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 42 survivors were picked up by the ASW trawler HMS Northern Spray (FY 129). The 5,081 ton Harbury was carrying anthracite and was headed for St. John, New Brunswick.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-5, the British motor merchant Dolius was torpedoed and sunk by the U-638, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Oskar Staudinger, south of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 66 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Sunflower (K 41). The 5,507 ton Dolius was carrying ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy ONS-5, the British steam merchant North Britain was torpedoed and sunk by the U-707, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Günter Gretschel, south of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 35 died and 11 survivors were picked up by the ASW trawler HMS Northern Spray (FY 129). The 4,635 ton North Britain was carrying firebricks and fire clay and was headed for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  
   
  The British steam merchant Holmbury was torpedoed and then sunk by gunfire by the U-123, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Horst von Schroeter, about 170 miles west of Cape Palmas, Liberia in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 44 survived. The 4,566 ton Holmbury was carrying general cargo and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Friday, May 7, 1943  
  The unescorted American steam merchant Samuel Jordan Kirkwood was torpedoed and sunk by the U-195, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Heinz Buchholz, about 125 miles southeast of Ascension Island, in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 71 survived and were picked up by U.S. Army crash boat. The 7,191 ton Samuel Jordan Kirkwood was carrying water ballast and was headed for the United States.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SL-128, the Greek steam merchant Laconikos was torpedoed and sunk by the U-89, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Dietrich Lohmann, in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 23 died and 11 survived. The 3,803 ton Laconikos was headed for Ardrossan, Scotland.  
   
  Sunday, May 9, 1943  
  A straggler from Convoy TS-38, the unescorted British steam merchant Kanbe was torpedoed and sunk by the U-123, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Horst von Schroeter, south of Monrovia, Liberia in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 61 died and 5 survivors were picked up by the Spanish steam merchant Rio Francoli. The 6,244 ton Kanbe was carrying general cargo, including copper and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The unescorted Norwegian motor merchant Corneville was torpedoed and sunk by the U-515, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Henke, about 30 miles off Takoradi, Ghana in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 41 survived reached land by lifeboat. The 4,544 ton Corneville was carrying general cargo, pig iron, and tea and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Tuesday, May 11, 1943  
  Sailing with Convoy SC-129, the British steam merchant Antigone was torpedoed and sunk by the U-402, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Siegfried von Forstner, about 300 miles northwest of the Azores in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 43 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Melrose Abbey. The 4,545 ton Antigone was carrying grain, general cargo, and 250 trucks and was headed for Avonmouth, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-129, the Norwegian steam merchant Grado was torpedoed and sunk by the U-402, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Siegfried von Forstner, approximately 300 miles northwest of the Azores in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 36 survived and were picked up by the British rescue ship Melrose Abbey. The 3,082 ton Grado was carrying steel and lumber and was headed for Ipswich, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-237, the British steam merchant Fort Concord was torpedoed and sunk by the U-456 approximately 300 miles northwest of the Azores. Of the ship’s complement, 35 died and 21 survived. The 7,138 ton Fort Concord was carrying grain and military stores and was headed for Manchester, England.  
   
  Wednesday, May 12, 1943  
  A straggler from Convoy HX-237, the Norwegian motor tanker Sandanger was torpedoed and sunk by the U-221, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Hartwig Trojer, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 20 died and 19 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMCS Kootenay (H 75). The 9,432 ton Sandanger was carrying gasoline and paraffin and was headed for Swansea, England.  
   
  A straggler from Convoy HX-237, the Norwegian motor merchant Brand was torpedoed and sunk by the U-603, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Rudolf Baltz, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 39 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMCS Morden (K 170). The 4,819 ton Brand was carrying flour, ammunition and various machines and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Thursday, May 13, 1943  
  Sailing with Convoy NC-18, the Cuban steam tanker Mambi was torpedoed and sunk by the U-176, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Reiner Dierksen, six miles north of Manati off the north coast of Cuba in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 23 died and 11 survived. The 1,983 ton Mambi was carrying ballast and was headed for Manzanilla, Cuba.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy NC-18, the American steam tanker Nickeliner was torpedoed and sunk by the U-176 six miles north of Manati. Of the ship’s complement, all 31 survived and were picked up by a Cuban submarine chaser. The 1,983 ton Nickeliner was carrying ammonia water and was headed for Manzanilla, Cuba.  
   
  Saturday, May 15, 1943  
  The unescorted Greek steam merchant Maroussio Logothetis was torpedoed and sunk by the U-105, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Jürgen Nissen, off the coast of Africa in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 27 died and 12 survived. The 4,669 ton Maroussio Logothetis was carrying iron and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The unescorted Irish steam merchant Irish Oak was torpedoed and sunk by the U-607, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Wolf Jeschonnek, in the central Atlantic Ocean. The 5,589 ton Irish Oak was headed for Dublin, Ireland.  
   
  Monday, May 17, 1943  
  Sailing with Convoy ONS-7, the British steam merchant Aymeric was torpedoed and sunk by the U-657, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Heinrich Göllnitz, east of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 43 died and 25 survivors were picked up by the armed trawler HMS Northern Wave (FY 153). The 5,196 ton Aymeric was carrying ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Tuesday, May 18, 1943  
  Sailing with Convoy KMS-14, the catapult armed merchant Empire Eve was sunk by the U-414, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Walther Huth, northeast of Mostaganem, Algeria in the Mediterranean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 81 survivors were picked up by the boom defense ship HMS Barfoil (Z 194). The 5,979 ton Empire Eve was carrying coal and lubricating oil and was headed for Algiers, Algeria.  
   
  Wednesday, May 19, 1943  
  The Canadian sailing ship Angelus was stopped by the U-161, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Albrecht Achilles, north of Bermuda and sunk by gunfire after the crew abandoned ship in a lifeboat. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 2 survivors were picked up by the destroyer USS Turner (DD 648). The 255 ton Angelus was carrying molasses and was headed for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  
   
  Thursday, May 20, 1943  
  Sailing with a coastal convoy, the Dutch steam tanker Benakat was torpedoed and sunk by the U-197, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Robert Bartels, in the south central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 44 survived. The 4,763 ton Benakat was carrying ballast and was headed for Baltimore, Maryland.  
   
  Thursday, May 27, 1943  
  The neutral Swedish motor merchant Sicilia was shelled and sunk by a torpedo by the U-181, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Wolfgang Lüth, off the coast of Mozambique in the western Indian Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 23 survived. The 1,633 ton Sicilia was carrying wheat flour and drums of fruit pulp and was headed for Beira, Mozambique.  
   
  Friday, May 28, 1943  
  Sailing with Convoy BT-14, the American steam tanker John Worthington was torpedoed and damaged beyond repair by the U-154, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Oskar-Heinz Kusch, about 125 miles east of Fortaleza, Brazil in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 56 survived as the ship made port at Trinidad. The 8,166 ton John Worthington was carrying water ballast and was headed for Trinidad.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy CD-20, the American steam merchant Agwimonte was torpedoed and sunk by the U-177, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Robert Gysae, off Cape Agulhas, South Africa in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 69 survived and were picked up by the South African armed trawler HMSAS Vereeniging (T 72). The 6,679 ton Agwimonte was carrying war cargo, tanks, and locomotives as deck cargo and was headed for Suez, Egypt.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy CD-20, the Norwegian motor merchant Storaas was torpedoed and sunk by the U-177 off Cape Agulhas. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 36 survivors and were picked up by the South African armed trawler HMSAS Vereeniging (T 72). The 7,886 ton Storaas was carrying ballast and was headed for Abadan, Iran.  
   
  Saturday, May 29, 1943  
  The unescorted British motor merchant Hopetarn was torpedoed and sunk by the U-198, commanded by Kapitän zur See Werner Hartmann, about 450 miles east of Durban in the western Indian Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and the second officer was taken prisoner by the U-boat. The other 36 survivors were picked up two days later by the British merchant Nirvana. The 5,231 ton Hopetarn was carrying general cargo and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Sunday, May 30, 1943  
  The American steam merchant Flora MacDonald was torpedoed and and damaged beyond repair by the U-126, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Siegfried Kietz, off the coast of Africa in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 63 survivors were picked up by its escort, the armed trawler HMS Fandango (T 107). The 7,177 ton Flora MacDonald was carrying cocoa, mahogany, and rubber and was headed for Freetown, Sierra Leone.  
   
  Axis Merchant Shipping Losses  
  xx.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  Thursday, May 20, 1943  
  The U.S. Tenth Fleet was established to contend with the German submarine threat in the Atlantic. The fleet would be under the direct command of the Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Ernest J. King, with day-to-day operations directed by Rear Admiral Francis S. Low, the Chief of Staff.  
     
   
     
   
 

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