July 1943 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  xx.  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  xx.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Thursday, July 1, 1943  
  The unescorted Brazilian steam merchant Tutoya was torpedoed and sunk by the U-513, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Friedrich Guggenberger, approximately 6 miles from Iguape, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died and 30 survived. The 1,125 ton Tutoya was carrying general cargo, including coffee, lumber, potatoes and salted meat and was headed for Port of Santos, Brzail.  
   
  Friday, July 2, 1943  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Empire Kohinoor was torpedoed and sunk by the U-618, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Kurt Baberg, about 250 miles southwest of Freetown, Sierra Leone, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 81 survived. The 5,225 ton Empire Kohinoor was carrying general cargo and was headed for the United Kingdom.  
   
  The unescorted turbine tanker Bloody Marsh was torpedoed and sunk by the U-66, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Friedrich Markworth, off the coast of South Carolina in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 74 survivors were picked up by the submarine chaser USS SC-1048. The 10,195 ton Bloody Marsh was carrying U.S. Navy fuel oil and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Saturday, July 3, 1943  
  The unescorted American steam merchant Elihu B. Washburne was torpedoed and sunk by the U-513, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Friedrich Guggenberger, off the coast of Brazil in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 70 survived reached land by lifeboat. The 7,176 ton Elihu B. Washburne was carrying coffee and was headed for Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  
   
  Sunday, July 4, 1943  
  The Brazilian steam merchant Pelotaslóide was torpedoed and sunk by the U-590, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Werner Krüer, five miles north of Salinas, Brazil in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 37 survivors were picked up by the Jundiaí (CS 58). The 5,228 ton Pelotaslóide was carrying coal and 400 tons of military stores, including aircraft engines and spare parts and was headed for Recife, Brazil.  
   
  The 20 ton Brazilian sailing ship Changri-Lá was sunk by gunfire by the U-199, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Werner Kraus, off the coast of Brazil near Rio de Janeiro in the western Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 10 died.  
   
  Monday, July 5, 1943  
  Sailing with Convoy GTMO-134, the American steam merchant Maltran was torpedoed and sunk by the U-759, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Rudolf Friedrich, about 70 miles west of Port Salut, Haiti in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, all 47 survived and were picked up by the submarine chaser USS SC-1279. The 3,513 ton Maltran was carrying general cargo and was headed for Ponce, Puerto Rico.  
   
  Wednesday, July 7, 1943  
  The American steam merchant James Robertson was torpedoed and sunk by the U-185, commanded by Kapitänleutnant August Maus, approximately 175 miles east of Fortaleza, Brazil in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 68 survived. The 7,176 ton James Robertson was carrying ballast and radio sets and was headed for Paramaribo, Dutch Guiana.  
   
  The American steam merchant Thomas Sinnickson was torpedoed and sunk by the U-185 approximately 175 miles east of Fortaleza. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 69 survived. The 7,176 ton Thomas Sinnickson was carrying manganese ore as ballast and was headed for Paramaribo, Dutch Guiana.  
   
  The American steam merchant steam tanker William Boyce Thompson was torpedoed and sunk by the U-185 approximately 175 miles east of Fortaleza. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 53 survived. The 7,061 ton William Boyce Thompson was carrying manganese ore as water ballast and was headed for Trinidad.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy TAG-70, the Dutch motor merchant Poelau Roebiah was torpedoed and sunk by the U-759, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Rudolf Friedrich, in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 2 died and 121 survivors were picked up by a U.S. Coast Guard cutter and several escort vessels. The 9,251 ton Poelau Roebiah was carrying passengers, manganese ore, and copper concentrates and was headed for Baltimore, Maryland.  
   
  Thursday, July 8, 1943  
  Sailing with Convoy TJ-1, the Norwegian motor tanker B.P. Newton was torpedoed and sunk by the U-510, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Alfred Eick, approximately150 miles northeast of Cayenne, French Guiana in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 23 died and 24 survived. The 10,324 ton B.P. Newton was carrying aviation fuel and was headed for East London, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy TJ-1, the American steam merchant Eldena was torpedoed and sunk by the U-510 approximately 150 miles northeast of Cayenne. Of the ship’s complement, all 66 survived and were picked up by the submarine chaser USS PC-495. The 6,900 ton Eldena was carrying general cargo and mail and was headed for Saldanha Bay, South Africa.  
   
  Friday, July 9, 1943  
  Sailing with Convoy ST-71, the British steam passenger ship De la Salle was torpedoed and sunk by the U-508, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Georg Staats, 60 miles southwest of Lagos in the Gulf of Benin in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 10 died and 239 survivors were picked up by the corvette FFL Commandant Detroyat (J 1166) and the British merchant Calabar. The 8,400 ton De la Salle was carrying passengers, general cargo, and government cargo and was headed for East London, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ST-71, the British steam merchant Manchester Citizen was torpedoed and sunk by the U-508 60 miles southwest of Lagos in the Gulf of Benin. Of the ship’s complement, 28 died and 76 survivors were picked up by the corvette FFL Commandant Detroyat (J 1166). The 5,343 ton Manchester Citizen was ballast and was headed for Lagos, Nigeria.  
   
  Saturday, July 10, 1943  
  The Swedish motor merchant Scandinavia was stopped and torpedoed and sunk in accordance with the prize rules by the U-510, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Alfred Eick, off the coast of South America in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 25 survived and reached land by lifeboat. The 1,641 ton Scandinavia was carrying general cargo and was headed for Montevideo, Uruguay.  
   
  Tuesday, June 22, 1943  
  Sailing with Convoy UGS-10, the French fleet oiler Lot was torpedoed and sunk by the U-572, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Heinz Kummetat, in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 23 died and 113 survivors were picked up by the oiler USS Merrimack (AO 37) and an escorting corvette. The 4,220 ton Lot was carrying fuel oil and passengers and was headed for Casablanca, Morocco.  
   
  Monday, June 28, 1943  
  Dispersed from Convoy OS-49, the British steam merchant Vernon City was torpedoed and sunk by the U-172, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Carl Emmermann, south-southeast of St. Paul Rocks in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 52 survived and were picked up by the Brazilian coastal tanker Aurora M. The 4,748 ton Vernon City was carrying coal and coke and was headed for Montevideo, Uruguay.  
   
  Axis Merchant Shipping Losses  
  xx.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  xx.  
     
   
     
   
 

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