September 1943 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
 
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Monday, September 6, 1943  
  The German battleship SMS Tirpitz, heavy cruiser SMS Scharnhorst, and nine destroyers (SMS Erich Steinbrinck, SMS Karl Galster, SMS Hans Lody, SMS Theodor Riedel, SMS Z27, SMS Z29, SMS Z30, SMS Z31, SMS Z33) departed on a bombardment sortie to Spitsbergen, Norway.  
   
  Wednesday, September 8, 1943  
  German naval forces led by the battleship SMS Tirpitz bombarded the 3” gun battery at Barentsburg, Norway. The accompanying destroyers landed parties who captured prisoners, wrecked a radio station, and destroyed a supply dump.  
   
  Monday, September 20, 1943  
  While escorting Convoy ON-202, the Canadian destroyer HMCS St. Croix (I 81) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-305, commanded by Rudolf Bahr, approximately 500 miles southwest of Iceland. Of the ship’s complement, 148 died and 81 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Itchen (K 227).  
   
  While escorting Convoy ON-202, the frigate HMS Lagan (K 259) was torpedoed and damaged beyond repair by the U-270, commanded by Horst Hepp, approximately 500 miles southwest of Iceland. Of the ship’s complement, 28 died. This was the first attack carried out with an acoustic torpedo.  
   
  Tuesday, September 21, 1943  
  While escorting Convoy ON-202, the corvette HMS Polyanthus (K 47) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-952, commanded by Oskar Curio, southwest of Iceland. Of the ship’s complement, 85 died and 1 survivor was picked up by the corvette HMS Itchen (K 227).  
   
  Wednesday, September 22, 1943  
  Six British Midget submarines attacked the German battleship SMS Tirpitz, in Altenfiord, Norway. Two of the submarines, the X6 and X7, penetrated the anti-submarine net defenses and planted mines under the hull of the battleship. In the following explosions, the hull was severely damaged, the port engine was destroyed, and the propeller shaft bent. Repairs to the SMS Tirpitz would take until March 1944 to complete.  
   
  Thursday, September 23, 1943  
  While escorting Convoy ON-202, the frigate HMS Itchen (K 227) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-666, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Engel, south-southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 227 died and 3 survived.  
   
  Saturday, September 25, 1943  
  The fleet minesweeper USS Skill (AM 115) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-593, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Gerd Kelbling, while on patrol station between Point Licosa and Isle of Capri in the Gulf of Salerno. Of the ship’s complement, 72 died and 31 survivors were picked up by the minesweeper USS Speed (AM 116).  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  xx.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Monday, September 6, 1943  
  The Soviet steam merchant Tbilisi struck a mine approximately 5 miles west of Krestovyj Island in the Enisej estuary, Kara Sea in the Arctic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died. The 7,169 ton Tbilisi was carrying coal and was headed for Dikson Island, Soviet Union.  
   
  Monday, September 20, 1943  
  Sailing with Convoy ON-202, the American steam merchant Theodore Dwight Weld was torpedoed and sunk by the U-238, commanded by Horst Hepp, approximately 500 miles southwest of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 33 died and 37 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Rathlin. The 7,176 ton Theodore Dwight Weld was carrying sand ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ON-202, the American steam merchant Frederick Douglass was torpedoed and damaged by the U-238 approximately 500 miles southwest of Iceland. Of the ship’s complement, all 70 survived and were picked up by the British rescue ship Rathlin. The abandoned Frederick Douglass was later torpedoed and sunk by the U-645, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Otto Ferro. The 7,176 ton Frederick Douglass was carrying sand ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant St. Usk was torpedoed and sunk by the U-161, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Albrecht Achilles, northeast of Martin Vaz Rocks off the coast of Brazil in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 51 survived and were picked up by the Spanish steam merchant Albareda. The 5,472 ton St. Usk was carrying general cargo, including rice, tinned meat, and cotton seed and was headed for Hull, England.  
   
  Thursday, September 23, 1943  
  Sailing with Convoy ON-202, the British steam merchant Fort Jemseg was torpedoed and sunk by the U-238, commanded by Horst Hepp, south-southeast of Cape Farewell, Greenland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 52 survivors were picked up by the ASW trawler HMS Northern Foam (4.76) and the Norwegian merchant Romulus. The 7,134 ton Fort Jemseg was carrying ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ON-202, the Norwegian motor merchant Oregon Express was torpedoed and sunk by the U-238 south-southeast of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 37 survivors were picked up by the British steam merchant Kingman and the Norwegian steam merchant Romulus. The 3,642 ton Oregon Express was carrying ballast and was headed for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ON-202, the Norwegian motor merchant Skjelbred was torpedoed and sunk by the U-238 south-southeast of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, all SAVED survived and were picked up by the ASW trawler HMS Northern Foam (4.76). The 5,096 ton Skjelbred was carrying ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ON-202, the British steam merchant Steel Voyager was torpedoed and sunk by the U-952 south-southeast of Cape Farewell. Of the ship’s complement, all 66 survived and were picked up by the French corvette FFL Renoncule (K 117) and the Canadian corvette HMCS Morden (K 170). The 6,198 ton Steel Voyager was carrying sand ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Sunday, September 26, 1943  
  The Brazilian motor merchant Itapagé was torpedoed and sunk by the U-161, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Albrecht Achilles, off the coast of Brazil in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 22 died and 85 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 4,998 ton Itapagé was carrying general cargo, including barrels with diesel oil and muriatic acid, beer, and two trucks and was headed for Belém, Brazil.  
   
  Thursday, September 30, 1943  
  Sailing with Convoy VA-18, the Soviet steam merchant Arkhangel´sk was torpedoed and sunk by the U-960, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Günther Heinrich, 40 miles west of Russkij Island in the Arctic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 17 died and 25 survivors were picked up by the Soviet minesweeper T-886 (No 31). The 2,480 ton Arkhangel´sk was carrying machinery equipment.  
   
  Axis Merchant Shipping Losses  
  xx.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  xx.  
     
   
     
   
 

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