November 1943 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Thursday, November 18, 1943  
  While escorting convoy MKS-30 the sloop HMS Chanticleer (U 05) was torpedoed and damaged beyond repair by the U-515, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Werner Henke, approximately 250 miles east-northeast of San Miguel, Azores in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 28 died.  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  xx.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Tuesday, November 2, 1943  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Baron Semple was torpedoed and sunk by the U-848, commanded by Fregattenkapitän Wilhelm Rollmann, northwest of Ascension Island in the south central Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 62 died. The 4,573 ton Baron Semple was carrying iron ore and was bound for the United Kingdom.  
   
  Wednesday, November 3, 1943  
  Sailing with Convoy KMS-30, the French steam merchant Mont Viso was torpedoed and sunk by the U-593, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Gerd Kelbling, off the coast of Algeria in the Mediterranean Sea. The 4,531 ton Mont Viso was bound for Bari, Italy.  
   
  Friday, November 5, 1943  
  The British schooner Beatrice Beck was torpedoed and sunk by the U-218, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Richard Becker, in the western Atlantic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of died. The 146 ton Beatrice Beck was carrying codfish and was bound for Barbados.  
   
  Saturday, November 13, 1943  
  The unescorted Panamanian steam merchant Pompoon was torpedoed and sunk by the U-516, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Rutger Tillessen, approximately 75 miles north of Cartegnea, Colombia in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 23 died and 4 survivors were picked up by a Panamanian ship. The 1,082 ton Pompoon was carrying general cargo and a deck cargo of steel pipes and steel reinforcing rods and was bound for Barranquilla, Colombia.  
   
  Thursday, November 18, 1943  
  The 39 ton Colombian sailing ship Ruby was sunk by gunfire by the U-516, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Rutger Tillessen, north of Colon, Panama. Of the ship’s complement, 4 died and 7 survived.  
   
  Tuesday, November 23, 1943  
  The unescorted American steam tanker Elizabeth Kellogg was torpedoed and sunk by the U-516, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Rutger Tillessen, 150 miles north of Cristobal, Panama in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 10 died and 38 survivors were picked up by the Army tanker USAT Y-10 and the submarine chaser USS SC-1017. The 5,189 ton Elizabeth Kellogg was carrying bunker C oil and was bound for Puerto Barrios, Guatemala.  
   
  Wednesday, November 24, 1943  
  The unescorted American steam merchant Melville E. Stone was torpedoed and sunk by the U-516, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Rutger Tillessen, approximately 100 miles northwest of Cristobal, Panama in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 15 died and 73 survivors were picked up by the submarine chasers USS SC-1023 and USS SC-662. The 7,176 ton Melville E. Stone was carrying copper, coffee, balsa, antimony, vanadium, and mail and was bound for New York, New York.  
   
  Tuesday, November 30, 1943  
  The French steam merchant Fort de Vaux was torpedoed and sunk by the U-68, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Albert Lauzemis, off Monrovia, Liberia. Of the ship’s complement, all 61 survived and were picked up by an escort. The 5,186 ton Fort de Vaux was carrying coffee, cotton, timber, and palm oil and was bound for Freetown, Sierra Leone.  
   
  Axis Merchant Shipping Losses  
  xx.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  xx.  
     
   
     
   
 

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