February 1944 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
 
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  xx.  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  Friday, February 4, 1944  
  The U-854, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Horst Weiher, struck a mine and sank in the Baltic Sea north of Swinemünde. Of the ship’s complement, 51 died and 7 survived.  
   
  The U-763, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Cordes, was attacked by a Liberator north-northwest of Cape Finisterre off the northwest coast of Spain in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. The aircraft was hit by AA fire during the attack run and crashed into the sea, killing the 7 crew members aboard. Depth charges were dropped, but did no damage to the U-boat.  
   
  Saturday, February 5, 1944  
  The U-763, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ernst Cordes, was attacked three different times by Allied aircraft in the Bay of Biscay in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Two aircraft were damaged by AA fire and the third crashed into the sea killing all 8 crewmen. There was no damage to the U-boat.  
   
  The U-963, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Karl Boddenberg, shot down an RAF B-24 Liberator from 53 Squadron in the eastern Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  Sunday, February 6, 1944  
  The U-177, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Heinz Buchholz, was sunk in the south Atlantic west of Ascension Island by depth charges from a U.S. Navy VB-107 Squadron Privateer. Of the ship’s complement, 50 died and 15 survived.  
   
  Tuesday, February 8, 1944  
  The U-762, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Walter Pietschmann, was sunk off Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean by depth charges from the British sloops HMS Woodpecker (U 08) and HMS Wild Goose (U 45). Of the 51 man crew, all hands were lost.  
   
  Wednesday, February 9, 1944  
  The U-734, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Jörg Blauert, was sunk southwest of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean by depth charges from the British sloops HMS Starling (U 66) and HMS Wild Goose (U 45). Of the 49 man crew, all hands were lost.  
   
  The U-238, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Horst Hepp, was sunk southwest of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean by depth charges from the British sloops HMS Starling (U 66), HMS Kite (U 87), and HMS Magpie (U 82). Of the 50 man crew, all hands were lost.  
   
  Thursday, February 10, 1944  
  The U-545, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Gert Mannesmann, was attacked by two aircraft west of the Hebrides in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Although it shot down one, a Canadian Wellington from Squadron 407, it suffered crippling damage from 4 depth charges dropped by a British Wellington from Squadron 612/O. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 56 survivors were picked up by the U-714.  
   
  The U-666, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Ernst Wilberg, was listed as missing in the in the northern Atlantic Ocean. There was no explanation for its loss. Of the 51 man crew, all hands were lost.  
   
  Friday, February 11, 1944  
  The U-283, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Günter Ney, was sunk by depth charges from a Canadian Wellington aircraft from RCAF Squadron 407/D southwest of the Faeroes in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the 49 man crew, all hands were lost.  
   
  The U-424, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Günter Lüders, was sunk southwest of Ireland by depth charges from the sloops HMS Wild Goose (U 45) and HMS Woodpecker (U 08). Of the 50 man crew, all hands were lost.  
   
  Saturday, February 19, 1944  
  The U-264, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hartwig Looks, was sunk by depth charges off Ireland in the north Atlantic Ocean by the British sloops HMS Woodpecker (U 08) and HMS Starling (U 66). Of the 52 man crew, all hands were lost.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  xx.  
   
  Axis Merchant Shipping Losses  
  Monday, February 7, 1944  
  The submarine HMS Taku (N 38), commanded by Lt. Arthur J. W. Pitt, torpedoed and sank the 6,298 ton German merchant Rheinhausen approximately 20 nautical miles north of Stavanger, Norway in the northern Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  xx.  
     
   
     
   
 

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