March 1944 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
 
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Wednesday, March 1, 1944  
  The frigate HMS Gould (K 476) was torpedoed and sunk in the northern Atlantic Ocean by the U-358, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Rolf Manke. Of the ship’s complement, 123 died and 14 survived.  
   
  Thursday, March 2, 1944  
  Sailing with Convoy MKS-40, the landing ship HMS LST-362 was torpedoed and sunk by the U-744, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz Blischke, in the northern Atlantic Ocean.  
   
  Thursday, March 9, 1944  
  While escorting convoy CU-16 the destroyer escort USS Leopold (DE 319) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-255, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Erich Harms, approximately 400 miles south of Iceland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 171 died and 28 survivors were picked up by the destroyer escort USS Joyce (DE 317).  
   
  Friday, March 10, 1944  
  While escorting the combined convoys of SL-150 and MKS-41, the corvette HMS Asphodel (K 56) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-575, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Wolfgang Boehmer, west-northwest of Cape Finisterre off the west coast Spain in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 92 died and 5 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Clover (K 134). After the attack the U-boat was hunted by escorts for 18 hours but managed to escape.  
   
  Thursday, March 23, 1944  
  The 241 ton Norwegian steam trawler Narvik was sunk by gunfire by the submarine HMS Syrtis (P 241), commanded by Lt Michael H. Jupp, Sleipnesodden, Norway.  
   
  Monday, March 27, 1944  
  The minesweeping trawler HMS Maaløy (J 136), commanded by T/Lt F. J. Perkins, was torpedoed and sunk by the U-510, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Alfred Eick, off Ceylon in the eastern Indian Ocean. All of the ship’s complement and passengers of 19 died including Maldivian Prime Minister Hassan Fareed.  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  Wednesday, March 1, 1944  
  Having just previously sank the just previously sank the HMS Gould (K 476), the U-358, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Rolf Manke, was sunk in the northern Atlantic Ocean by depth charges from the British frigates HMS Affleck (K 362), HMS Gore (K 481) and HMS Garlies (K 475). Of the 51 man crew, 50 died and 1 survived.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Wednesday, March 1, 1944  
  The steam merchant Saint Louis was torpedoed and sunk by the U-66, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Gerhard Seehausen, off Accra, Ghana on the west coast of Africa in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 85 died and 49 survived. The 5,202 ton Saint Louis was carrying general cargo and was headed for Lomé, Togo.  
   
  Saturday, March 4, 1944  
  Sailing with Convoy RA-57, the British steam merchant Empire Tourist was torpedoed and sunk by the U-703, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Joachim Brünner, in the far northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 68 survived and were picked up by the minesweeper HMS Gleaner (J 83). The 7,062 ton Joachim Brünner was carrying timber and coal and was headed for Loch Ewe, Scotland.  
   
  Sunday, March 5, 1944  
  The unescorted British steam merchant John Holt was torpedoed and sunk by the U-66, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Gerhard Seehausen, about 60 miles south of the Opobo River in the Gulf of Guinea off the coast of Africa in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 95 survived and were picked up by the British tanker Empire Ruby. The 4,964 ton John Holt was carrying cement and general cargo, including mail and was headed for Warri, Nigeria.  
   
  Tuesday, March 7, 1944  
  The unescorted Panamanian Steam tanker Valera was torpedoed and sunk by the U-518, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Werner Offermann, off Barranquilla, Columbia in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 34 survivors were picked up by a U.S. Coast Guard vessel. The 3,401 ton Valera was carrying heavy boiler navy fuel oil and was headed for Cristobal, Dominican Republic.  
   
  Monday, March 13, 1944  
  The unescorted Greek steam merchant Peleus was torpedoed and sunk by the U-852, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz-Wilhelm Eck, about 500 miles north of Ascension Island in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 32 died and 3 survivors were picked up by the Portuguese steam merchant Alexandre Silva. The 4,695 ton Peleus was carrying ballast and was headed for Buenos Aires, Argentina.  
   
  Sunday, March 19, 1944  
  Sailing with Convoy CU-17, the American steam tanker Seakay was torpedoed and sunk by the U-311, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Joachim Zander, in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 84 survivors were picked up by the destroyer escort USS Reeves (DE 156). The 10,342 ton Seakay was carrying kerosene and a deck cargo of 14 fighter aircraft and was headed for Avonmouth, England.  
   
  Tuesday, March 21, 1944  
  The unescorted British steam tanker Matadian was torpedoed and sunk by the U-66, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Gerhard Seehausen, southeast of Lagos, Nigeria in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 47 survived and were picked up by the motor launch HMS ML-282. The 4,275 ton Matadian was carrying palm oil and was headed for England.  
   
  Wednesday, March 22, 1944  
  Sailing with Convoy SH-125, the Canadian steam merchant Watuka was torpedoed and sunk by the U-802, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Helmut Schmoeckel, southeast of Halifax, Canada in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 25 survivors were picked up by the minesweeping trawler HMCS Anticosti (T 274). The 1,621 ton Watuka was carrying coal and was headed for Halifax.  
   
  Monday, March 27, 1944  
  The unescorted British motor merchant Tulagi was torpedoed and sunk by the U-532, commanded by Fregattenkapitän Ottoheinrich Junker, northeast of Cape Comorin, India in the Indian Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 47 died and 7 survivors reached land by lifeboat. The 2,281 ton Tulagi was carrying flour and mail and was headed for Colombo, Ceylon.  
   
  Axis Merchant Shipping Losses  
  xx.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  xx.  
     
   
     
   
 

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