April 1944 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Monday, April 3, 1944  
  Operation "Tungsten" was conducted: 42 bombers and 80 fighters from the aircraft carriers HMS Furious and HMS Victorious bombed the SMS Tirpitz while she was in Norwegian waters, the Altenfjord, and caused sufficient damage with 15 hits to extend the vessel's inactivity by another 3 months. The attack killed 122 men and wounded 316.  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  Thursday, April 6, 1944  
  Having just attacked Convoy SC-156 and sank the merchant ships Ruth I and South America the submarine U-302, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Sickel, was sunk north-west of the Azores in the northern Atlantic Ocean by depth charges from the British frigate HMS Swale (K 217), commanded by Lt. Commander John Jackson.  
   
  Sunday, April 16, 1944  
  After having previously sunk the merchant tanker Pan Pennsylvania, the U-550, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Klaus Hänert, was sunk by depth charges and gunfire from the US destroyer escorts USS Gandy (DE 764), USS Joyce (DE 317) and USS Peterson (DE 152). Of the 46 man crew, 44 died and 12 survived were lost.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Saturday, April 1, 1944  
  The unescorted British steam merchant Dahomian was torpedoed and sunk by the U-852, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Heinz-Wilhelm Eck, ten miles west-southwest of Cape Point, South Africa in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 49 survivors were picked up by the South African armed whalers HMSAS Krugersdorp (T 48) and HMSAS Natalia (T 02). The 5,277 ton Dahomian was carrying general cargo, including 17 aircraft and mail and was headed for Capetown, South Africa.  
   
  Thursday, April 6, 1944  
  Sailing with Convoy SC-156, the Norwegian steam merchant Ruth I was torpedoed and sunk by the U-302, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Herbert Sickel, north-west of the Azores in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 36 survivors were picked up by the frigate HMS Chelmer (K 221). The 3,531 ton Ruth I was carrying steel, lumber, and pit props and was headed for Liverpool, England.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy SC-156, the Norwegian motor tanker South America was torpedoed and sunk by the U-302 north-west of the Azores. Of the ship’s complement, all 42 survived and were picked up by the British rescue ship Goodwin. The 6,246 ton South America was carrying crude oil and was headed for Ellesmere Port, England.  
   
  Saturday, April 8, 1944  
  Dispersed from Convoy OS-71, the British steam merchant Nebraska was torpedoed and sunk by the U-843, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Oskar Herwartz, southwest of Ascension Island in the southern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 66 survived. The 8,261 ton Nebraska was carrying ballast and was headed for Buenos Aires, Argentina.  
   
  Thursday, April 13, 1944  
  The Norwegian motor fishing vessel Solvoll was sunk by gunfire by the U-711, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Günther Lange, about 150 miles west of the Lofoten Islands, off the coast of northern Norway in the Arctic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, all 8 survived and were picked up by the U-711 and were held in a prison by the Gestapo until the end of the war. The 10 ton Solvoll was carrying rocks as ballast and was headed for Iceland.  
   
  Sunday, April 16, 1944  
  Sailing with Convoy CU-21, the American turbine tanker Pan Pennsylvania was torpedoed and sunk by the U-550, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Klaus Hänert, about 200 miles east of New York in the western Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 25 died and 56 survivors were picked up by the destroyer escorts USS Joyce (DE 317) and USS Peterson (DE 152). The 11,017 ton Pan Pennsylvania was carrying octane gasoline and aircraft as deck cargo and was headed for Barry, Wales.  
   
  Axis Merchant Shipping Losses  
  xx.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  xx.  
     
   
     
   
 

The objective of WW2Timelines.com is to provide a day by day account of the events that lead up to and were part of the greatest conflict known to mankind. There are accounts for the activities of each particular day and timelines for subjects and personalities. It is the of this website intent to provide an unbiased account of the war. Analysis, effects caused by an event, or prior or subsequent pertinent events are presented separately and indicated as text that is italicized.

 
   
  Copyright 2011
WW2timelines.com
Contact us using our email page