June 1944 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Wednesday, June 14, 1944  
  The antisubmarine trawler HMS Birdlip (T 218) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-547, commanded by Leutnant zur See Heinrich Niemeyer, off Greenville, Liberia in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 36 died and 15 survived.  
   
  Thursday, June 15, 1944  
  The frigate HMS Blackwood (K 313) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-764, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hanskurt von Bremen, while it was on patrol as part of the 4th Escort Group in the west end of the English Channel to protect the ships of the Normandy landings. Of the ship’s complement, 58 died and 98 survived.  
   
  The frigate HMS Mourne (K 261) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-767, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Walter Dankleff, while it was on patrol as part of the 5th Escort Group in the west end of the English Channel to protect the ships of the Normandy landings.  
   
  Sunday, June 25, 1944  
  Operating with the 5th Escort Group the frigate HMS Goodson (K 480) was torpedoed and damaged beyond repair by the U-984, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Heinz Sieder, in the English Channel.  
   
  Tuesday, June 27, 1944  
  The corvette HMS Pink (K 137) was torpedoed and damaged beyond repair by the U-988, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Erich Dobberstein, in the English Channel.  
   
  Wednesday, June 28, 1944  
  Sailing with Convoy FXP-18, the British Landing Ship Infantry HMS Maid of Orleans was torpedoed and sunk by the U-988, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Erich Dobberstein, southeast of St. Catherine´s Point, Isle of Wight in the English Channel. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 93 survivors were picked up by the corvette HMS Hotham (K 583), the escort destroyer HMS Eglinton (L 87) and the British tug Empire Roger. The 2,385 ton HMS Maid of Orleans was carrying ballast and was headed for Portsmouth, England.  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  Sunday, June 4, 1944  
  The German submarine U-505 was captured intact off the coast of Cape Blanco off the coast of Africa by U.S. Navy task force 22.3. The alert crew of the destroyer escort USS Chatelain (DE 149) was able to board the German boat before she could be scuttled. The U-505 now resides at the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Monday, June 5, 1944  
  The Panamanian steam merchant Pillory was torpedoed and sunk by the U-539, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Jürgen Lauterbach-Emden, near San Juan, Puerto Rico in the Caribbean Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 225 died and 22 survivors were picked up by the U.S. Coast Guard vessels. The 1,517 ton Pillory was carrying ballast and was heading for Guayanilla, Puerto Rico.  
   
  Wednesday, June 14, 1944  
  The French steam merchant Saint Basile was torpedoed and sunk by the U-547, commanded by Leutnant zur See Heinrich Niemeyer, off Greenville, Liberia in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 6 died and 58 survived. The 2,778 ton Saint Basile was carrying general cargo, including wood and was headed for Freetown, Sierra Leone.  
   
  Friday, June 16, 1944  
  The unescorted South African steam merchant Columbine was torpedoed and sunk by the U-198, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Burkhard Heusinger von Waldegg, northwest of Cape Castle, South West Africa in the southeastern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 23 died and 29 survivors were picked up by patrol craft. The 3,268 ton Columbine was carrying timber and was headed for Capetown, South Africa.  
   
  Thursday, June 29, 1944  
  Sailing with Convoy ECM-17, the American steam merchant H.G. Blasdel was torpedoed and damaged beyond repair by the U-984, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Heinz Sieder, approximately 30 miles south of St. Catherine’s point on the Isle of Wight in the English Channel. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 76 died and 432 survivors were picked up by the British buoy tender and the HMS LST-326. The 7,176 ton H.G. Blasdel was carrying troops, tanks, trucks, jeeps and other mechanized equipment and was headed for Utah Beach, Normandy.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ECM-17, the American steam merchant James A. Farrell was torpedoed and damaged beyond repair by the U-984 approximately 30 miles south of St. Catherine’s point. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 4 died and 490 survivors were picked up by the British landing ship HMS LST-50. The 7,176 ton James A. Farrell was carrying military vehicles and troops and was headed for Omaha Beach, Normandy.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ECM-17, the American steam merchant John A. Treutlen was torpedoed and damaged beyond repair by the U-984, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Heinz Sieder, about 30 miles south of St. Catherine’s point on the Isle of Wight in the English Channel. Of the ship’s complement, all 74 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMCS Buctouche (K 179) and the USS LST-336. The 7,198 ton John A. Treutlen was carrying engineering equipment and a deck cargo of machinery and was headed for Normandy.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy ECM-17, the British steam merchant Empire Portia was torpedoed and damaged beyond repair by the U-988, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Erich Dobberstein, near the Isle of Wight in the English Channel. Of the ship’s complement, 5 died and 42 survived. The 7,058 ton Empire Portia was carrying ballast and was headed for Portsmouth, England.  
   
  Axis Merchant Shipping Losses  
  xx.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  xx.  
     
   
     
   
 

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