September 1944 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Friday, September 1, 1944  
  The corvette HMS Hurst Castle (K 416) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-482, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Graf von Hartmut Matuschka, Freiherr von Toppolczan und Spaetgen, north of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 17 died and 107 survivors were picked up by the destroyer HMS Ambuscade (D 38).  
   
  Friday, September 8, 1944  
  While escorting Convoy HX-305, the British rescue ship Pinto was torpedoed and sunk by the U-482, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Graf von Hartmut Matuschka, Freiherr von Toppolczan und Spaetgen, north of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 18 died and 41 survivors were picked up by the minesweeping trawler HMS Northern Wave (FY 153).  
   
  Friday, September 15, 1944  
  A force of 28 British Lancaster bombers, flying from a Soviet airbase, attacked the German battleship Tirpitz at its anchorage in Altafiord, Norway. Special 12,000-pound “Tall Boy” bombs were used but only one bomb hit was achieved on the battleship’s bow because of the Germans created a smoke screen that obscured the target.  
   
  Saturday, September 23, 1944  
  The Soviet corvette Brilliant (No 29) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-957, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Gerd Schaar, north of Kravkov Island in the Kara Sea in the Arctic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 64 died.  
   
  Sunday, September 24, 1944  
  The Soviet fleet minesweeper T-120 was torpedoed and sunk by the U-739, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Ernst Mangold, northwest of the Skott-Hansen Island in the Kara Sea in the Arctic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 41 died and 44 survived.  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  xx.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Sunday, September 3, 1944  
  Sailing with Convoy ONF-251, the Norwegian steam merchant Fjordheim was torpedoed and sunk by the U-482, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Graf von Hartmut Matuschka, Freiherr von Toppolczan und Spaetgen, northwest of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 35 survivors were picked up by the Canadian corvette HMCS Montreal (K 319). The 4,115 ton Fjordheim was carrying anthracite coal and was headed for Halifax, Nova Scotia.  
   
  The unescorted British steam merchant Livingston was torpedoed and sunk by the U-541, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Kurt Petersen, northeast of Louisburg, Nova Scotia in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 14 died and 14 survivors were picked up by the Canadian corvette HMCS Barrie (K 138). The 2,140 ton Livingston was carrying general cargo and was headed for St. John’s, Newfoundland.  
   
  Friday, September 8, 1944  
  Sailing with Convoy HX-305, the British steam tanker Empire Heritage was torpedoed and sunk by the U-482, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Graf von Hartmut Matuschka, Freiherr von Toppolczan und Spaetgen, north of Ireland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 112 died and 51 survivors were picked up by the minesweeping trawler HMS Northern Wave (FY 153). The 15,702 ton Empire Heritage was carrying fuel oil and deck cargo, including tanks and trucks and was headed for Glasgow, Scotland.  
   
  Friday, September 29, 1944  
  Sailing with Convoy RA-60, the American steam merchant Edward H. Crockett was torpedoed and sunk by the U-310, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Wolfgang Ley, off the North Cape in the Barents Sea in the Arctic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 1 died and 67 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Zamalek. The 7,176 ton Edward H. Crockett was carrying chrome ore as ballast and was headed for New York, New York.  
   
  Sailing with Convoy RA-60, the British steam merchant Samsuva was torpedoed and sunk by the U-310 off the North Cape. Of the ship’s complement, 3 died and 57 survivors were picked up by the British rescue ship Rathlin. The 7,219 ton Samsuva was carrying pit props and was headed for Loch Ewe, Scotland.  
   
  Axis Merchant Shipping Losses  
  xx.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  xx.  
     
   
     
   
 

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