December 1944 events of the Battle of the Atlantic  
 
  Naval Action in the Atlantic Ocean  
  Tuesday, December 5, 1944  
  The Soviet patrol craft BO-230 was torpedoed and sunk by the U-365, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Diether Todenhagen, in the Barents Sea in the Arctic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement died.  
   
  Wednesday, December 6, 1944  
  The frigate HMS Bullen (K 469) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-775, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Erich Taschenmacher, off Strathy Point in the Pentland Firth, Scotland in the northern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 71 died and 97 survived. The corvettes HMS Loch Insh (K 433) and HMS Goodall (K 479) of the same Escort Group hunted the U-boat for the next 14 hours but she escaped undamaged.  
   
  Thursday, December 7, 1944  
  The Soviet patrol craft BO-229 was torpedoed and sunk by the U-997, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans Lehmann, in the Barents Sea in the Arctic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 23 died and 13 survivors were picked up by the Soviet patrol craft BO-227.  
   
  Wednesday, December 20, 1944  
  The landing ship USS LST-359 was torpedoed and sunk by the U-870, commanded by Korvettenkapitän Ernst Hechler, approximately 370 miles from Sao Miguel, Azores in the central Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 2 died and 105 survivors were picked up by the American tug Moose Peak.  
   
  Thursday, December 21, 1944  
  The Soviet motor boat Reshitel´nyj was sunk by gunfire by the U-995, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Georg Hess, near Cape Korabelnaja in the Barents Sea in the Arctic Ocean.  
   
  Sunday, December 24, 1944  
  While escorting Convoy CC the Canadian fleet minesweeper HMCS Clayoquot (J 174) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-806, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Klaus Hornbostel, outside the approaches to Halifax harbor in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 8 died and 73 survived. For more information on these vessels visit the HMCS Clayoquot and the U-806 pages on www.uboat.net.  
   
  Tuesday, December 26, 1944  
  While part of the 1st Escort Group the frigate HMS Affleck (K 462) was torpedoed and damaged beyond repair by the U-486, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Gerhard Meyer, off Cherbourg, France in the English Channel. Of the ship’s complement, 7 died.  
   
  While part of the 1st Escort Group the frigate HMS Capel (K 470) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-486, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Gerhard Meyer, off Cherbourg, France in the English Channel. Of the ship’s complement, 76 died and the survivors were picked up by American motor torpedo boats.  
   
  Friday, December 29, 1944  
  Sailing with Convoy KB-37, the Soviet minesweeping trawler T-883 (No 37) was torpedoed and sunk by the U-995, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Georg Hess, southeast of Cape Svyatoj Nos in the Barents Sea on the Arctic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 49 died.  
   
  U-Boat Losses  
  xx.  
   
  Attacks on Allied and Neutral Merchant Ships  
  Sunday, December 3, 1944  
  Sailing with Convoy KB-35, the Soviet steam merchant Revoljucija was torpedoed and sunk by the U-1163, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Ernst-Ludwig Balduhn, in the Barents Sea in the Arctic Ocean. All of the ship’s complement of 23 died. The 433 ton Revoljucija was bound for Archangelsk, Soviet Union.  
   
  The unescorted Canadian steam merchant Cornwallis was torpedoed and sunk by the U-1230, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans Hilbig, 10 miles southwest of Mount Desert Rock in the Gulf of Maine in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 43 died and 5 survivors were picked up by the fishing vessel Notre Dame. The 5,458 ton Cornwallis was carrying bagged sugar and molasses in barrels and was bound for St. John, New Brunswick.  
   
  Tuesday, December 5, 1944  
  Sailing with Convoy PK-20, the Soviet steam merchant Proletarij was torpedoed and sunk by the U-995, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Hans-Georg Hess, about 15 miles north of Tsyp-Navolok Cape in the Barents Sea in the Arctic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 31 died and 22 survivors were picked up by the Soviet submarine chaser MO-426. The 1,123 ton Proletarij was bound for Kola Bay, Soviet Union.  
   
  Sunday, December 10, 1944  
  The unescorted American steam merchant Dan Beard was torpedoed and sunk by the U-1202, commanded by Kapitänleutnant Rolf Thomsen, off Strumble Head, North Wales in the Irish Sea. Of the ship’s complement, 29 died and 38 survivors were picked up by a coastal craft or reached land by lifeboat. The 7,176 ton Dan Beard was carrying ballast and was bound for the United States.  
   
  Saturday, December 23, 1944  
  Sailing with Convoy MKS-71, the British steam merchant Dumfries was torpedoed and sunk by the U-322, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Gerhard Wysk, south of St. Catherine´s Point, Isle of Wight in the English Channel. Of the ship’s complement, all 59 survived and were picked up by the corvette HMS Balsam (K 72). The 5,149 ton Dumfries was carrying iron ore and was bound for Tyne, England.  
   
  Sunday, December 24, 1944  
  Sailing with Convoy WEP-3, the Belgian troop transport Leopoldville was torpedoed and sunk by the U-486, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Gerhard Meyer, approximately five miles off Cherbourg, France in the English Channel. Of the ship’s complement and passengers, 819 died and 1555 survived. The 11,509 ton Leopoldville was carrying troops and war material and was bound for Cherbourg.  
   
  Tuesday, December 26, 1944  
  The 417 ton Soviet motor fishing vessel RT-52 Som was torpedoed and sunk by the U-995, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Georg Hess, off Cape Svyatoy Nos in the Barents Sea in the Atlantic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 31 died and the one survivor was taken prisoner by the U-boat.  
   
  Saturday, December 30, 1944  
  Sailing with Convoy KP-24, the Soviet steam merchant Tbilisi was torpedoed and sunk by the U-956, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Dieter Mohs, in the Barents Sea in the Arctic Ocean. Of the ship’s complement, 47 died and 139 survived. The 7,176 ton Tbilisi was carrying war material, including food, hay, fuel oil and benzine in barrels and was bound for Liinakhamari, Soviet Union.  
   
  Axis Merchant Shipping Losses  
  xx.  
   
  Other Battle of the Atlantic Events  
  xx.  
     
   
     
   
 

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