Events Relating to the Rise of the Third Reich in 1930  
  Thursday, August 7, 1930  
  Berlin commandant of the Sturmabteilung (SA) Walter Stennes met with Nazi Party Gauleiter of Berlin Joseph Goebbels to review the SA’s list of demands. Stennes demanded in particular that the SA receive three ballot slots in the upcoming election and threatened a "palace revolution" otherwise, claiming that he would resign and take 80% of Berlin SA (some 15,000 men) with him. Stennes would not be granted an audience with Hitler when he went to Munich to discuss the SA demands.  
   
  Wednesday, August 27, 1930  
  Berlin commandant of the Sturmabteilung (SA) Walter Stennes had a second meeting with Nazi Party Gauleiter of Berlin Joseph Goebbels to review the SA’s list of demands. Stennes demanded in particular that the SA receive three ballot slots in the upcoming election, more money for the SA and more political power in the movement.  
   
  Saturday, August 30, 1930  
  Berlin commandant of the Sturmabteilung (SA) Walter Stennes withheld protection of the SA for Nazi Party Gauleiter of Berlin Joseph Goebbels speech at the Sportpalast in Berlin. Stennes and his men paraded instead in Wittenbergplatz, demonstrating against Goebbels. Goebbels turned to the Schutzstaffel (SS) who provided the necessary security and protection at the meeting.  
   
  The SA then stormed the Gau office on the Hedemannstrasse, injuring the SS men and wrecking the premises. Goebbels was shocked at the extent of the damage done and notified Nazi Party leader Adolf Hitler, who left the Wagner Festival at Bayreuth and flew immediately to Berlin.  
   
  Sunday, August 31, 1930  
  Nazi Party leader Adolf Hitler talked to Berlin commandant of the Sturmabteilung (SA) and to groups of SA urging them to follow his leadership. He redefined the issue of their demands in different and simpler terms: Was the SA entirely loyal to Hitler under the Führerprinzip, or not?  
   
  Monday, September 1, 1930  
  Hitler convened a meeting of approximately 2,000 Sturmabteilung (SA) and announced he was personally taking over as Supreme Leader of the SA and SS. The SA men cheered and were delighted that their Leader was finally giving them the recognition they felt they deserved. Hitler also had Berlin commandant of the SA Stennes read a declaration increasing SA funding. A special levy would be made on party dues to pay for the increased funding.  
   
  November 1930  
  Christian Schreiber, Catholic Bishop of Berlin, granted permission for those in his diocese to become members of the Nazi party.  
   
  Wednesday, December 5, 1930  
  In Berlin, Joseph Goebbels accompanied by Nazi Storm Troopers disrupted the premiere of "All Quiet on the Western Front," a film based on the novel of the same title by Erich Maria Remarque. Nazi protestors throw smoke bombs and sneezing powder to halt the film. Members of the audience who protested the disruption were beaten. The novel had always been unpopular with the Nazis, who believed that its depiction of the cruelty and absurdity of war was "un-German." Ultimately, the film will be banned.  
     
   
     
   
 

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