The Nakamura Incident Timeline
June - September 1931
 
   
  Early June 1931  
  Captain Nakamura Shintaro secured travel permits from the Chinese government in Harbin. Nakamura used a false name and declared that the onject of the trip was to make an agricultural survey.  
   
  Mid-June 1931  
Captain Nakamura Shintaro, accompanied by Nobutaro Isugi, a retired Japanese army sergeant, a Mongolian and a Russian interpreter left Pokotu on the Chinese Eastern Railway. The Nakamura party would travel incognito, in civilian dress, and Nakamura represented himself as an "agricultural expert". Nakamura would make stops along the Chinese Eastern Railway, at Manchuli, Tsitsihar, Angangehi, and Hailar taking notes.
   
  Saturday, June 27, 1931  
  Captain Nakamura Shintaro, accompanied by Nobutaro Isugi, a retired Japanese army sergeant, a Mongolian and a Russian interpreter were arrested by troops loyal to Manchurian warlord Zhang Xueliang under the command of Kuan Yuheng, Commander of the Third Regiment of the Chinese Reclamation Army in Manchuria, outside Taonan, Manchuria. The Chinese considered the Nakamura party as spies and believed they were looking to find water sources and places for encampment for future Japanese military operations in northwest Manchuria.  
   
  Wednesday, July 1, 1931  
  Captain Nakamura Shintaro and his party were executed by troops loyal to Manchurian warlord Zhang Xueliang under the command of Kuan Yuheng, Commander of the Third Regiment of the Chinese Reclamation Army. Their bodies were immediately cremated to conceal evidence of the action.  
   
  July 1931  
  Japanese Consul General in Mukden Hayashi Kyujiro formed an investigative committee composed of a Consul official, an official from the Southern Manchurian Railway, and an Army officer to investigate the Nakamura Incident.  
   
  Friday, July 17, 1931  
  Details of the Nakamura Incident became known to the Japanese public. With the news coming soon after the Wanpaoshan Incident, public opinion was further inflamed, increasing anti-Chinese sentiment in Japan. The Japanese military was quick to capitalize on this upsurge in public opinion to demand a stronger foreign policy against China.  
   
  Monday, August 17, 1931  
  Foreign Minister Shidehara Kijuro dispatched Consul General Hayashi Hisajiro from Tokyo to Manchuria with instructions to investigate and settle the Nakamura Incident. Shidehara was anxious to enforce his "Friendship Policy" in Manchuria and give the Japanese Army no occasion to capitalize on the affair. The Consul-General wold call upon the Chinese Governor of Liaoning Province, who appointed a commission to investigate and report upon the incident.  
   
  Tuesday, September 15, 1931  
  At a special conference Army Minister General Minami Jiro and Chief of Staff Kanaya Hanzo expressed the view that the death of Nakamura was highly significant and should be used to “bring about a fundamaental change in the Chinese attitude.” They called for retribution and agreed that “the time is ripe … to launch a vigourous campaign to reach a basic solution of the present situation.” Foreign Minister Shidehara Kijuro was still insisting on a diplomatic solution to the incident.  
   
  Wednesday, September 16, 1931  
  The Chinese investigation into the Nakamura Incident reported back to Fengtian. The Chinese also brought in the guilty party for imprisonment. Japanese Consul General in Mukden Hayashi Hisajiro and the Chinese would work out details over the next two days over a resolution of the problem that would include a court-martial of the man responsible for the execution of the Nakamura party and profound apologies by the Chinese.  
   
  Friday, September 18, 1931  
  Japanese Consul General Hayashi Hisajiro (having the same powers as an ambassador) and Chinese General Yung Chen held a formal conference in Mukden regarding the Nakamura Incident. General Yung admitted Chinese guilt in the affair and the two reached a resolution that would include a court-martial of the man responsible for the execution of the Nakamura party and profound apologies by the Chinese. Because it was a Japanese Army affair the conference was recessed at 8 p.m. so that Colonel Doihara Kenji, chief of the army’s Special Affairs Section, could be consulted. Doihara could not be found because he was taking part in the Mukden Incident that would occur later that night and render the resolution of the Nakamura Incident moot.  
     
   
     
   
 

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